Eurovision Song Contest 1997

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Eurovision Song Contest 1997
Eurovision Song Contest Logo 1997.svg
Dates
Final date 3 May 1997
Host
Venue Point Theatre
Dublin, Ireland
Presenter(s) Carrie Crowley
Ronan Keating
Conductor Frank McNamara
Executive supervisor Marie-Claire Vionnet
Executive producer Noel Curran
Host broadcaster Raidió Teilifís Éireann (RTÉ)
Interval act Ronan Keating,
Boyzone
Participants
Number of entries 25
Debuting countries None
Returning countries  Italy
Withdrawing countries  Belgium
 Finland
 Israel
 Macedonia
 Romania
 Slovakia
Vote
Voting system Each country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 points to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points  Norway
 Portugal
Winning song  United Kingdom
"Love Shine a Light"
Eurovision Song Contest
◄1996 Wiki Eurovision Heart (Infobox).svg 1998►

The Eurovision Song Contest 1997, was the 42nd Eurovision Song Contest and it was held at the Point Theatre Dublin, Ireland, on 3 May 1997. Carrie Crowley and Boyzone member Ronan Keating were the presenters of the show.

Winners[edit]

Katrina and the Waves, representing the United Kingdom, were the winners of the contest with the song "Love Shine a Light", written by that band's lead guitarist Kimberley Rew, and Marc Roberts from Republic of Ireland came second with "Mysterious Woman". Despite being the runner-up, it remarkably received only one 12-point score, which came from the United Kingdom. The UK spokesman Colin Berry remarked: "You're going to like this one: Ireland, twelve points!" causing Terry Wogan to reply: "Well, tit for tat!" The winning song scored an unprecedented 227 points; it received points from all participating countries, including five sets of 10 points and a record-breaking ten sets of the maximum 12 points. "Love Shine a Light" is still regarded as one of the most successful Eurovision winners,[1] and was the closing song in the medleys that opened the 50th anniversary show "Congratulations" in Copenhagen in 2005, and the ESC 2006 semi-final in Athens. With this victory, the United Kingdom has five Eurovision wins and it is to date the country's last win in the Contest.

Format[edit]

After the controversy over the pre-selection in 1996, the European Broadcasting Union introduced a new system for 1997: countries with the lowest average scores over the previous four years would be excluded from the 1997 contest, and those with the lowest averages over the previous five years would be excluded from future contests (save that every country so excluded for one year would automatically be allowed to participate the following year), with so many countries being omitted as would reduce the number of participants each year to 25.

Israel declined to participate, as the Contest was held on its Holocaust Remembrance Day, granting a reprieve to Bosnia and Herzegovina, which would otherwise have been excluded owing to its low point average over the previous four years.

RTÉ once again produced a highly spectacular show, with a stage that had a smaller performance space for the artists than in previous years. This was the third Eurovision set to be designed by Paula Farrell, who had previously been involved with the 1988 and 1994 contests.

There was a wide array of different styles this year. Denmark brought a rap song, Croatia came with their version of the Spice Girls and Sweden brought a mid-1980s style boy band. The music was in general more modern than before, and for the first time in six years, an up-tempo song won.

This year, televoting was tested in five countries: Austria, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. The results of the televoting countries were, in some cases, different from those that used a jury. Iceland received 16 of its 18 points from these five countries.

Also, for the first time in Eurovision history, there was a country where not one, but two spokespeople gave votes- France. Television reporter Frédéric Ferrer and 1977 Eurovision winner Marie Myriam each took turns at giving results from that country.

Long-time Irish conductor Noel Kelehan was not the host conductor this year, the duty being fulfilled by Frank McNamara. However, from this year entrants were allowed to use playback without orchestra accompaniment, and in 1999, the orchestra would be abolished completely.

Results[edit]

Draw Country Language[2] Artist Song English translation Place Points
01  Cyprus Greek Hara & Andreas Konstantinou "Mana Mou" (Μάνα μου) Motherland 5 98
02  Turkey Turkish Şebnem Paker & Grup Ethnic "Dinle" Listen 3 121
03  Norway Norwegian Tor Endresen "San Francisco" 24 0
04  Austria German1 Bettina Soriat "One Step" 21 12
05  Ireland English Marc Roberts "Mysterious Woman" 2 157
06  Slovenia Slovene Tanja Ribič "Zbudi se" Wake up 10 60
07   Switzerland Italian Barbara Berta "Dentro di me" Inside of me 22[3] 5
08  Netherlands Dutch Mrs. Einstein "Niemand heeft nog tijd" No one has time anymore 22 5
09  Italy Italian Jalisse "Fiumi di parole" Rivers of words 4 114
10  Spain Spanish Marcos Llunas "Sin rencor" Without rancour 6 96
11  Germany German Bianca Shomburg "Zeit" Time 18[3] 22
12  Poland Polish Anna Maria Jopek "Ale jestem" But I am 11 54
13  Estonia Estonian Maarja-Liis Ilus "Keelatud maa" Forbidden land 8 82
14  Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnian Alma Čardžić "Goodbye" 18 22
15  Portugal Portuguese Célia Lawson "Antes do adeus" Before goodbye 24 0
16  Sweden Swedish Blond "Bara hon älskar mig" If only she loves me 14 36
17  Greece Greek Marianna Zorba "Horepse" (Χόρεψε) Dance 12[3] 39
18  Malta English Debbie Scerri "Let Me Fly" 9 66
19  Hungary Hungarian V.I.P. "Miért kell, hogy elmenj?" Why do you have to go? 12 39
20  Russia Russian Alla Pugacheva "Primadonna" (Примадонна) 15 33
21  Denmark Danish Kølig Kaj "Stemmen i mit liv" The voice in my life 16 25
22  France French Fanny "Sentiments songes" Dream feelings 7 95
23  Croatia Croatian E.N.I. "Probudi me" Awaken me 17 24
24  United Kingdom English Katrina & The Waves "Love Shine a Light" 1 227
25  Iceland Icelandic Paul Oscar "Minn hinsti dans" My final dance 20 18
1.^ The Austrian entry also featured some lyrics in English.

Voting structure[edit]

Each country had a jury that awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points for their top ten songs, or a televote, where the top ten most voted for songs were awarded the 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points.

Iceland got most of its 18 points from the 5 countries that used televoting. Ireland was ostensibly the best scoring country across the televoting countries, except they were able to score points from all 5 televoting countries. The United Kingdom was only eligible to receive points from 4 of them, since they couldn't vote for themselves. In fact, the UK received 12 points from all the other televoting countries except Germany, from whom they received 10 points: in other words, the UK earned 46 of 48 possible televote points that year; Ireland earned 47 of 60 possible televote points—including their only 12 from the UK.

Score sheet[edit]

Voting procedure used:
Red: Televote.
Blue: Jury.
Voters
Total Score Cyprus Turkey Norway Austria Ireland Slovenia Switzerland Netherlands Italy Spain Germany Poland Estonia Bosnia and Herzegovina Portugal Sweden Greece Malta Hungary Russia Denmark France Croatia United Kingdom Iceland
Contestants Cyprus 98 2 3 4 4 10 4 10 5 1 3 12 7 1 7 4 4 5 12
Turkey 121 7 2 6 2 7 12 12 6 12 5 6 7 10 6 4 6 4 7
Norway 0
Austria 12 3 1 5 3
Ireland 157 8 6 3 10 1 7 4 10 6 8 7 8 8 10 10 8 5 10 10 6 12
Slovenia 60 2 10 2 4 7 4 3 5 10 7 3 3
Switzerland 5 2 3
Netherlands 5 1 4
Italy 114 6 5 1 1 10 10 7 8 4 8 6 12 3 5 3 7 4 10 3 1
Spain 96 10 4 6 5 8 6 3 2 4 8 6 12 10 8 2 2
Germany 22 3 5 5 3 1 5
Poland 54 4 8 7 1 1 2 6 3 4 2 1 7 5 3
Estonia 82 1 6 8 3 12 4 7 6 1 1 1 4 8 8 10 2
Bosnia and Herzegovina 22 8 4 2 3 4 1
Portugal 0
Sweden 36 8 5 6 6 7 4
Greece 39 12 5 7 6 2 7
Malta 66 5 12 10 7 6 1 5 8 3 1 8
Hungary 39 3 4 5 5 2 5 2 8 5
Russia 33 1 5 12 8 7
Denmark 25 7 1 7 2 2 6
France 95 3 2 12 10 2 3 5 12 12 3 6 2 4 2 6 1 10
Croatia 24 4 1 3 2 5 8 1
United Kingdom 227 7 7 6 12 12 8 12 12 8 5 10 10 10 10 7 12 10 1 12 12 12 12 12 8
Iceland 18 2 2 8 6

12 points[edit]

Below is a summary of all 12-point in the final:

N. Contestant Voting nation
10 United Kingdom Austria, Croatia, Denmark, France, Hungary, Ireland, Netherlands, Russia, Switzerland, Sweden
3 France Estonia, Poland, Norway
Turkey Bosnia and Herzegovina, Germany, Spain
2 Cyprus Greece, Iceland
1 Estonia Italy
Greece Cyprus
Ireland United Kingdom
Italy Portugal
Malta Turkey
Russia Slovenia
Spain Malta

Returning artists[edit]

Artist Country Previous Year(s)
Alma Čardžić  Bosnia and Herzegovina 1994
Maarja-Liis Ilus  Estonia 1996
Şebnem Paker  Turkey 1996

International broadcasting[edit]

Other involved countries[edit]

 FR Yugoslavia
After the breakup of Yugoslavia, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was last participated in 1992. RTS 2 broadcast the show, although Yugoslavia did not participate.

Commentators[edit]

Spokespersons[edit]

National jury members[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ As noted on a TOTP2 Eurovision special, it ranks third in the rankings of points achieved as a percentage of maximum available with 227 out of 288 or 78.81%, behind Nicole's "Ein bißchen Frieden" in 1982 (161 out of 204 or 78.92%) and Brotherhood of Man's "Save Your Kisses for Me" in 1976 (164 out of 204 or 80.39%). For comparison, Elena Paparizou's 2005 win took 230 points out of a possible 456, or only 50.04%.
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