Eustace Budgell

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Eustace Budgell
Eustace Budgell by John Faber 1720.jpg
Born 19 August 1686
Exeter, Devon
Died 4 May 1737 (aged 50)
London, England
Nationality English
Occupation writer, politician

Eustace Budgell (19 August 1686 – 4 May 1737) was an English writer and politician.

Born in St Thomas near Exeter, Budgell was educated at Oxford University. His cousin, the writer Joseph Addison, took him to Ireland and got him appointed to a lucrative office. However, when he lampooned the Viceroy, he lost his position.

Budgell assisted Addison with his magazine, The Spectator, writing 37 numbers signed X. In these he imitates Addison's style with some success. Between 1715 and 1727, he represented Mullingar in the Irish House of Commons.

Budgell, who was vain and vindictive, fell on evil days; he lost a fortune in the South Sea Bubble and was accused of forging the will of Dr Matthew Tindal at the expense of his nephew, Nicolas Tindal. He committed suicide by throwing himself out of a boat at London Bridge. His suicide note famously said: "What Cato did, and Addison approved, cannot be wrong."[1]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainCousin, John William (1910). A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature. London: J. M. Dent & Sons. Wikisource

  1. ^ Colt, George Howe (1992). The Enigma of Suicide. Simon and Schuster. p. 169. ISBN 978-0-671-76071-7. Retrieved July 17, 2009. 
Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by
Thomas Bellew
Charles Melville
Member of Parliament for Mullingar
1715–1727
With: Thomas Bellew
Succeeded by
Sir Arthur Acheson, 5th Bt
John Rochfort