C's Ware

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C's Ware is a label of HimeyaSoft Inc. (not to be confused with their US-Distribution arm Himeya Soft Inc.) from Tokyo, Japan developing story-driven interactive visual novel adventure games, such as Desire, EVE Burst Error, and Glo-Ri-A.

Desire, Xenon and EVE Burst Error were produced by Hiroyuki Kanno, while their chiptune soundtracks were composed by Ryu Umemoto; both Kanno and Umemoto also worked on ELF's YU-NO: A girl who chants love at the bound of this world (1996). Kanno and Umemoto died in 2011, both at the age of 37.

C's Ware games[edit]

Some of the C's Ware games:

The title theme "Xenon" composed by Ryu Umemoto for the 1994 visual novel adventure game Xenon, written and produced by Hiroyuki Kanno.

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Eve Burst Error[edit]

"Room (Marina)" (1995), a chiptune music track composed by Ryu Umemoto for the visual novel adventure game Eve Burst Error, written and produced by Hiroyuki Kanno.

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One of C's Ware's most notable visual novel games was EVE Burst Error (1995), written and produced by Hiroyuki Kanno and with chiptune video game music composed by Ryu Umemoto. The game featured a branching narrative where two different protagonists, one male and one female, provide different perspectives on the story. The game introduced a unique twist to the system by allowing the player to switch between both protagonists at any time during the game, instead of finishing one protagonist's scenario before playing the other. EVE Burst Error often requires the player to have both protagonists co-operate with each other at various points during the game.[1] The use of multiple perspectives was since used in a number of later visual novels, such as Fate/stay night (2004),[2] Machi (1998), and 428: Fūsa Sareta Shibuya de (2008).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Commodore Wheeler. "EVE Burst Error". RPGFan. Retrieved 3 September 2011. 
  2. ^ Chris Klug; Josiah Lebowitz (March 2011). Interactive Storytelling for Video Games: A Player-Centered Approach to Creating Memorable Characters and Stories. Burlington, MA: Focal Press. pp. 194–7. ISBN 0-240-81717-6. Retrieved 20 February 2012. 

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