Ever to Excel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Main article: List of Greek phrases

"Ever to Excel" is the English translation of the Ancient Greek phrase 'αἰὲν ἀριστεύειν'. It has been used as motto by a number of educational institutions.

Origin and etymology[edit]

The phrase is derived from the sixth book of Homer's Iliad, in which it is used in a speech Glaucus delivers to Diomedes. During a battle between the Greeks and Trojans, Diomedes is impressed by the bravery of a mysterious young man and demands to know his identity. Glaucus replies: "Hippolocus begat me. I claim to be his son, and he sent me to Troy with strict instructions: Ever to excel, to do better than others, and to bring glory to your forebears, who indeed were very great ... This is my ancestry; this is the blood I am proud to inherit."

Usage as a motto[edit]

Engraving of the motto on Bapst Library at Boston College

The phrase has been used as the motto of a number of schools and universities, mainly in the United Kingdom, but also in the United States and Canada. These include schools such as Caistor Grammar School, Edinburgh Academy,[1] Kelvinside Academy[2] and Old Scona Academic High School,[3] as well as universities such as Boston College[4] and the University of St Andrews.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Edin Acad". Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "Kelvinside". Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  3. ^ "Old scona". Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  4. ^ "Boston College". Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "Coat of Arms". University of St Andrews. Retrieved 2012-04-17.