Everyday Demons

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Everyday Demons
Studio album by The Answer
Released March 2, 2009 (UK)
March 31, 2009 (US)
Recorded 2008
Genre Hard rock
Length 46:10
Label Albert Productions
The Answer chronology
Rise: Special Edition
(2007)
Everyday Demons
(2009)
Revival
(2011)
Special Edition
Singles from Everyday Demons
  1. "On and On"
    Released: 22 February 2009
  2. "Tonight"
    Released: 21 June 2009
  3. "Comfort Zone"
    Released: 29 November 2009
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Hard Rock Hideout 8.5/10 stars[1]
Allmusic 3/5 stars[2]
Ultimate Guitar 9/10 stars[3]
411Mania 8/10 stars[4]
Shakenstir 5/5 stars[5]
Yorkshire Soul 5/5 stars[6]
Metal Invader 5/5 stars[7]
WTTJ 9/10 stars[8]
Metal Underground 5/5 stars[9]

"Everyday Demons" is the second studio album by Irish rock band The Answer. It was released on 2 March 2009 in the UK and 31 March 2009 in the US.[10]

On 28 January 2009, the album leaked onto the internet. The special 2CD version of this album includes a whole concert recorded live at the Shibuya-AX in Tokyo, Japan, on 27 March 2007 as an audio on the second CD.

The album entered the UK Albums Chart at #25.

Track listing[edit]

Disc One
No. Title Length
1. "Demon Eyes"   4:08
2. "Too Far Gone"   4:03
3. "On and On"   3:37
4. "Cry Out"   5:08
5. "Why'd You Change Your Mind"   4:52
6. "Pride"   3:51
7. "Walkin' Mat"   4:11
8. "Tonight"   3:42
9. "Dead of the Night"   3:16
10. "Comfort Zone"   4:43
11. "Evil Man"   4:35
Disc Two (Live At The Shibuya A.X., Tokyo on 27 March 2007)
No. Title Length
1. "Come Follow Me"   5:57
2. "No Questions Asked"   3:05
3. "Doctor"   5:00
4. "Never Too Late"   3:58
5. "Keep Believin'"   4:40
6. "Always"   2:20
7. "Sometimes Your Love"   4:54
8. "Under the Sky"   7:05
9. "Preachin'"   8:27
10. "Into the Gutter"   4:50
11. "Sweet Emotion"   5:54
12. "Memphis Water"   6:14
13. "Be What You Want"   5:02
14. "Moment/Jam"   3:05

Song information[edit]

Demon Eyes[edit]

According to Cormac Neeson, "Demon Eyes" is "basically about the two-faced motherf—kers in this world who think they're the dog's bollocks. They pretend to be your friend but the whole time they're looking down on you in a very f—king condescending way and then going round the corner and slagging you off behind your back."[11]

"Demon Eyes" was iTunes "Single of the Week" for the week beginning March 10, 2009.[11]

Too Far Gone[edit]

"Too Far Gone" was written in response to then-Prime Minister Tony Blair's plans to introduce ID cards in the UK. In Neeson's opinion, "they might as well attach tracking devices on to everybody so they know exactly where everybody's going at every moment of the day."[12]

On and On[edit]

Neeson explained in a Kerrang! interview that "On and On", the first single to be released from Everyday Demons, is "about stepping up to the challenges that everyday life throws at you."[13]

Cry Out[edit]

Cormac Neeson notes that "Cry Out" is an attempt to "capture the spirit of youth, that kinda feeling when you're young". The song's lyrics reference Troublegum and "Take the Power Back", by Therapy? and Rage Against the Machine, respectively, two bands favoured by Neeson in his youth.[14]

Why'd You Change Your Mind[edit]

"Why'd You Change Your Mind" relates, to a certain degree, to Neeson's efforts to comprehend why a friend of his chose to commit suicide. Neeson explains: "In the chorus of the song I'm just trying to understand what goes through a person's mind and why they should take their own life."[15]

Pride[edit]

"Pride" pertains to Neeson's time working in a bar in Ireland, where "you'd see a lot of really beautiful young women coming into the bar and kinda drink themselves away all day and end up going home with some kind of f—king lowlife motherf—ker, who was just hanging around the bars waiting to pick up women like that. I just remember thinking these girls don't need to do that. They're beautiful, intelligent and they deserve a lot better."[16]

Walkin' Mat[edit]

Cormac Neeson explains that "Walkin' Mat" is about "the world we're living in at the minute, the one that as you know yourself has the shallow music industry parties that you've got to go to, and everybody's a smiling face and a compliment and you have to really see through that. There's just some point along the way you just get sick of it. You're just talking like that because you're off your face on coke and you don't mean what you're saying." Neeson notes the influence of The Black Crowes and AC/DC on this track.[17]

Tonight[edit]

According to Neeson, "Tonight", the album's second single, is about the "simple philosophy" of "meeting a girl and taking her out and letting the f—king fireworks commence."[18]

Dead of the Night[edit]

"Dead of the Night" is about how the band views itself, both at home in Belfast, and around the world. Neeson explains, "When you're away from home you almost start to paint a prettier picture of where you're from, whether it's homesickness or just missing your local pub and friends. When you get back there and you're like, okay, this is the reality, this is the way it is, and that's cool too."[19]

Comfort Zone[edit]

Cormac Neeson states that "Comfort Zone" is simply "about stepping out of your comfort zone and taking a chance. I'm a firm believer that you really benefit from taking the riskier decision."[20] It was the third, and final, single released from Everyday Demons, its video having been released on November 4, 2009.

Evil Man[edit]

According to Neeson, "Evil Man" portrays the story of "a girl I know that went to a bar one night and got her drink spiked by one of those date rape drugs. Luckily enough, she got away unscathed." Neeson suggests that the perpetrators of such actions "are f—king scum of the earth." The song is sung from the perspective of the man, "which gives the song a bit of a twist as well."[21]

Personnel[edit]

  • Cormac Neeson — lead vocals, harmonica
  • Paul Mahon — guitar
  • Micky Waters — bass
  • James Heatley — drums

Sales chart positions[edit]

Album
Chart (2009) Peak position
UK Albums Chart[22] 25
Top Heatseekers[23] 39

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hard Rock Hideout review
  2. ^ Allmusic review
  3. ^ Ultimate Guitar review
  4. ^ 411Mania review
  5. ^ Shakenstir review
  6. ^ Yorkshire Soul review
  7. ^ Metal Invader review
  8. ^ WTTJ review
  9. ^ Metal Underground review
  10. ^ The Answer official website
  11. ^ a b "Demon Eyes by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  12. ^ "Too Far Gone by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  13. ^ "On And On by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  14. ^ "Cry Out by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  15. ^ "Why'd You Change Your Mind by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  16. ^ "Pride by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  17. ^ "Walkin' Mat by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  18. ^ "Tonight by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  19. ^ "Dead Of The Night by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  20. ^ "Comfort Zone by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  21. ^ "Evil Man by The Answer Songfacts". Songfacts.com. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  22. ^ "Answer". chartstats.com. Retrieved 13 February 2013. 
  23. ^ "Everyday Demons - The Answer - Awards". Allmusic. Retrieved 13 February 2013.