Evgeny Donskoy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Evgeny Donskoy
Evgeny Donskoy RG13 (15).JPG
Evgeny Donskoy playing at Roland Garros 2013
Country  Russia
Residence Moscow, Russia
Born (1990-05-09) 9 May 1990 (age 24)
Moscow, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Turned pro 2007
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Coach(es) Marat Safin
Prize money $748,617
Singles
Career record 17–31
Career titles 0
6 Challengers
Highest ranking No. 65 (July 8, 2013)
Current ranking No. 107 (April 7, 2014)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 3R (2013)
French Open 2R (2013)
Wimbledon 1R (2013, 2014)
US Open 3R (2013)
Doubles
Career record 6–11
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 161 (November 5, 2012)
Current ranking No. 290 (October 14, 2013)
Grand Slam Doubles results
French Open 1R (2013)
Wimbledon 1R (2013)
Last updated on: October 15, 2013.
Evgeny Donskoy
Medal record
Tennis
Competitor for  Russia
Summer Universiade
Bronze 2009 Belgrade Singles

Evgeny Evgenyevich Donskoy (born May 9, 1990) is a Russian tennis player playing on the regular ATP tour. He was born and currently resides in Moscow, Russia. As of 2013, he is mentored by former two-time Grand Slam champion Marat Safin.[1][2]

Career[edit]

His career-high ATP singles ranking is World No. 65, achieved in July 2013, after winning five Challenger events throughout the previous year. His favorite surface is hard courts.

In 2013, Donskoy entered Australian Open's main draw for the first time, reaching the third round and defeating 23rd seed Mikhail Youzhny in route. He also pushed Andy Murray to three sets in the Indian Wells Masters 1000 event.[3][4] Also for the first time, he entered the French Open's main draw. He beat Jan-Lennard Struff in the first round.

At the 2013 TOPSHELF Open held in 's-Hertogenbosch, he took out third seed John Isner in the first round and beat Robin Haase in the second to reach his first ATP Tour quarterfinals.

Style of play[edit]

He has very powerful, flat groundstrokes, especially his forehand, which can produce spectacular points but also a lot of unforced errors.[5]

Singles performance timeline[edit]

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR LQ (Q#) A P Z# PO SF-B F S G NMS NH

Won tournament; or reached Final; Semifinal; Quarter-final; Round 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a Round Robin stage; lost in Qualification Round; absent from tournament event; played in a Davis Cup Zonal Group (with its number indication) or Play-off; won a bronze, silver (F or S) or gold medal at the Olympics; a downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament (Not a Masters Series); or a tournament that was Not Held in a given year.

To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated either at the conclusion of a tournament, or when the player's participation in the tournament has ended.

Current till US Open 2013.

Tournament 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 SR W–L Win %
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A Q1 Q1 3R A 0 / 1 2–1 66.67%
French Open A Q2 Q1 2R Q2 0 / 1 1–1 50.00%
Wimbledon A A Q1 1R 1R 0 / 2 0–2 0.00%
US Open Q1 Q2 A 3R 0 / 1 2–1 66.67%
Win–Loss 0–0 0–0 0–0 5–4 0–1 0 / 5 5–5 50.00%

Doubles performance timeline[edit]

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR LQ (Q#) A P Z# PO SF-B F S G NMS NH

Won tournament; or reached Final; Semifinal; Quarter-final; Round 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a Round Robin stage; lost in Qualification Round; absent from tournament event; played in a Davis Cup Zonal Group (with its number indication) or Play-off; won a bronze, silver (F or S) or gold medal at the Olympics; a downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament (Not a Masters Series); or a tournament that was Not Held in a given year.

To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated either at the conclusion of a tournament, or when the player's participation in the tournament has ended.

Current till US Open 2013.

Tournament 2013 2014 SR W–L Win %
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open 0 / 0 0–0 0%
French Open 1R 0 / 1 0–1 0%
Wimbledon 1R 0 / 1 0–1 0%
US Open 0 / 0 0–0 0%
Win–Loss 0–2 0 / 2 0–2 0%

ITF & Challenger finals[edit]

Singles: 11 (8–3)[edit]

Legend
ATP Challengers (6–2)
ITF Futures (2–1)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. June 16, 2008 Ukraine Ukraine F3 Clay Ukraine Denys Molchanov 6–7(10–12), 7–6(7–5), 6–4
Runner-up 1. March 15, 2010 Kazakhstan Kazakhstan F1 Hard Russia Alexander Kudryavtsev 4–6, 3–6
Winner 1. February 26, 2011 Morocco Casablanca, Morocco Clay Italy Alessio di Mauro 2–6, 6–3, 6–3
Winner 2. March 7, 2011 Spain Spain F7 Clay Italy Simone Vagnozzi 7–5, 7–5
Runner-up 1. July 3, 2011 Germany Braunschweig, Germany Clay Czech Republic Lukáš Rosol 5–7, 6–7(2–7)
Winner 2. February 25, 2012 Morocco Meknes, Morocco Clay Romania Adrian Ungur 6–1, 6–3
Runner-up 2. July 21, 2012 Russia Penza, Russia Hard Ukraine Illya Marchenko 5–7, 3–6
Winner 3. July 29, 2012 Kazakhstan Astana, Kazakhstan Hard Turkey Marsel İlhan 6–3, 6–4
Winner 4. August 26, 2012 Spain Segovia, Spain Hard France Albano Olivetti 6–1, 7–6(13–11)
Winner 5. November 11, 2012 United Kingdom Loughborough, United Kingdom Hard Germany Jan-Lennard Struff 6–2, 4–6, 6–1
Winner 6. November 25, 2012 Russia Tyumen, Russia Hard Ukraine Illya Marchenko 6–7(6–8), 6–3, 6–2

References[edit]

External links[edit]