Evgeny Belyaev

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For the Soviet skier, see Yevgeny Belyayev.
Evgeny Mikhailovich Belyaev
Bse sci lib com.jpg
Evgeny Belyaev [1]
Background information
Born (1926-09-11)September 11, 1926
Klintsy, Bryansk Oblast, Soviet Union
Origin Klintsy, Bryansk Oblast, Soviet Union
Died February 21, 1994(1994-02-21) (aged 67)
Moscow, Russia
Genres Opera, Romantic music, military music, ethnic Russian music, easy listening, middle of the road, folk music.
Occupation(s) Alexandrov Ensemble soloist
Years active 1955–1992
Labels Kultur, BMG, EMI, Melodiya, Silva, Teldec, Victor, Columbia. Supraphon,
Associated acts Alexandrov Ensemble

Evgeny Mikhailovich Belyaev, also written as Yevgeny Belyayev (Russian: Евгений Михайлович Беляев), (Klintsy, September 11, 1926 – February 21/22, 1994) was a Russian tenor soloist of the Alexandrov Ensemble under Boris Alexandrov. He is remembered in the Soviet Union as the Russian Nightingale [2] and in the West as one of the definitive singers of Kalinka.

Biography[edit]

Early years and private life[edit]

On September 11, 1926, he was born in Klintsy in the Bryansk Oblast.[3] As a child, he was known by the diminutive, Zhenia (the soft "g" of Bryansk).[4] As a schoolboy he won a singing competition at the Artek (camp) (Young Pioneer camp) near the Black Sea.[5]

During World War II he served in the subdivision of zenith troops and gained the Army Olympiad Prize.[6] He fought in Czechoslovakia and served as a Lance Corporal in the first Red Orders of Suvorov and Kutuzov division of the Carpathian Military District of the 4th Ukrainian Front under the command of General-Colonel Andrei Yeremenko. He is also said to have been in an anti-aircraft warfare unit and to have finished the war as a sergeant.[7] He is said to have sung in the lulls between the fighting.[8] (NB: The Suvorov and Kutuzov division later became the 93rd Mechanized Brigade (Ukraine)).

He then graduated from Gnessin State Musical College.[9] He married and had two sons, one of whom was a professional pianist.[10]

Musical career[edit]

1947: He was a soloist of the Ensemble of Song and Dance of the Carpathian military district.[11]

1952: He became a Member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU).[12]

1955: He was a soloist of the Ensemble of Song and Dance of the Soviet Army of Alexandrov (Alexandrov Ensemble).[13] Under conductor Boris Alexandrov he recorded many songs, and performed all over the world: e.g. Europe, USA, Canada and Japan. The Ensemble performed music by Soviet composers, and Russian and Ukrainian folk songs. Kalinka always drew special applause [14] During his time as soloist with the Ensemble, Belyaev's singing teacher was Yevgeny Kanger, who only trained the leading soloists.[15]

1958: Received the title: Honoured Artist of Russia (Meritorious Artist).[16]

1960: Received the title: People's Artist of Russia.[17]

1967: He was made People's Artist of the USSR.[18]

1960s-1970s: When the ensemble visited London, Belyaev was described as the "Russian Nightingale" and "Mr Kalinka",[19][20] and again "Monsieur Kalinka" in France.[21]

1978: He won the State Prize of the USSR.[22]

1980: He appears to have been associated in some way with Roskontsert (or Roskontserta), the big-band variety orchestra headed by the Russian jazz musician Oleg Lundstrem [23] .[24][25] Also in this year he sang the voice-over part of the cartoon rabbit in the Russian film,Pif Paf Oi Oi Oi (Russian: Пиф Паф Ой Ой Ой) (possibly Dir. Garri Bardin, 1980) .[26][27] This animated cartoon dramatizes via opera a Russian nursery rhyme about a hunter shooting a rabbit ("Pif-paf!") which is brought home and found to be still alive ("Oi! Oi!").[28] Belyaev mainly performed in small chamber concerts in Russia after he left the Ensemble.[29]

At some point he was made Honorary Citizen of Klintsy, his home town .[30]

1994: In the 1990s he sang with the government musical organization RosKontsert as an independent soloist. On February 21 or 22, 1994 he died.[31][32] Belyaev attended Burdenko Military Hospital in Moscow with heart problems. He asked the doctors to let him go home for the weekend because there are usually no doctors during the weekend in hospitals, so they agreed. As soon as he arrived home on Kalininsky prospect in Moscow he died straight away of a heart attack. He was buried in Moscow, not far from his fellow soloist Alexei Sergeev, in a section of Novodevichy Cemetery (Russian: Новоде́вичье кла́дбище) affiliated branch located in Kuntsevo District.[33][34][35]

Critical commentary[edit]

Evgeny Belyaev singing "Kalinka"

This commentary is about a music video featuring Evgeny Belyaev (see screenshot, right): Belyaev sings "Kalinka" on the music video "Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble".[36] The first "Mr Kalinka" was Victor Nikitin who was the second tenor (Pyotr Tverdokhlebov was the first) to perform it with the dramatic, overarching and operatic notes which now precede the chorus in every Ensemble soloist's performance of this song. The origin of this kind of tenor-bravado introduction to a song is in Arab music, and can still be heard in Flamenco cante jondo. "Kalinka" is a trivial song about a snowball tree, but it lends itself perfectly to this kind of operatic showing-off. Belyaev himself was already the recipient of popular acclaim after the 1956 London tour, and he had already been called "Mr Kalinka": the obvious natural successor to Nikitin. So in this performance, as the screenshot clearly shows, he is an immensely confident man with a great musical future before him. In fact it was very possibly the Cold War which kept him tied to the Ensemble and away from the operatic career which he clearly deserved. Since Nikitin, "Kalinka" has always been one of the signature songs of the Ensemble, and the performances are always presented as both great achievement and great fun. This ca.1960 video is filmed outdoors, and shows the soldiers laughing, joshing each other, and dancing comically at the end. This is acting of course, and a striking contrast to the severe picture of Soviet life which was being presented at that time in the West. In the last moments of the "Kalinka" performance, Belyaev, like the other soldierly soloists not allowed to gesticulate while singing, cannot help himself and performs a brief Russian dance movement with his arms, showing us something we did not know before: that his background was in Russian dance culture as well as in music.[37]

Notability[edit]

Evgeny Belyaev (ca.1970s).

Worldwide fame[edit]

This superb lyric tenor [38] did not get the worldwide acclaim that he deserved during his lifetime; possibly because his prime occurred in the middle of the Cold War. Also his fame was subsumed within the fame of the Alexandrov Ensemble itself, when perhaps he would have gained greater personal fame had he pursued his natural course in the international opera circuit. However, it happens that he sang one of the definitive recorded versions of "Kalinka", and perhaps due to that, he is now becoming widely recognised and appreciated on websites such as YouTube.[39] This is partly the result of "Kalinka" being recently associated with Chelsea Football Club.

Russian fame[edit]

April 2007: In celebration of the 300th anniversary of the founding of Klintsy, Belyaev's home town, it was decided to install a bust of the singer by the sculptor A.Smirnov in the town .[40][41]

February 2008: A memorial concert was given in Bryansk in memory of Belyaev. It was attended by his great-niece Ekaterina Belaeva, fellow Communist Party members, people from his hometown Klintsy, and his old musical colleagues from the Alexandrov Ensemble. On this day the Klintsovskoy children's music school was named after Evgeny Belyaev.[42]

Repertoire[edit]

His work as soloist with the Alexandrov Ensemble meant that he sang primarily songs in the Russian folk music genre, traditional songs, and other songs about Russia, besides a few foreign songs and operatic arias. For this he was considered a "national treasure".[43]

What the songs are about[edit]

In alphabetical order of translated titles, with links to auto-translated lyrics:

The peninsula of Svyatoy Nos, Lake Baikal.
A Zemlyanka or dugout used by partisans in the Czech Republic, now a World War II memorial.
Red Army soldiers with the Maxim gun, c. 1930.

"Accidental Waltz": Probably a love song (lyrics unavailable).

"And Again I Am in Line": Song of the veteran pilots of World War II, and their replacement by younger pilots [44]

"Baikal Beauty" recalls beautiful Lake Baikal and a girl at home for the homesick soldier.[45]

"Before the Long Journey" remembers preparations for people's long journeys in the past; comparing them with the preparations of modern astronauts. Possibly sung as a tribute to Yuri Gagarin and his fellow astronauts.[46]

"Bryanski Partisan Song": A guerilla song about Soviet partisans that mentions an ambush, burnt houses and revenge.[47]

"By Mostochku Narrow": Possibly a veteran soldier's reminiscences (lyrics unavailable).

"Choir of Sailors from the Opera Dawn": (lyrics unavailable).

"Click the Guy": About soldiers, girls and Moscow (lyrics unavailable).

"The Cruiser Aurora": "What do you dream of, cruiser Aurora, in the hour when the morning comes on the Neva?" The Aurora is a symbol of the Communist Revolution, and she has been a museum ship on the Neva at St. Petersburg since 1957.[48]

"Donetski Night": refers to the horror of the Battle of Stalingrad, and optimism about a woman (lyrics unavailable).

"Evening on the Road"/"Night on the Road": A sailors' song about going to sea.[49]

"Far Far Away": About border guards far from home, protecting their homeland.[50]

"Favourite Remember Us": Possibly about soldiers under orders, who know they will not come back (lyrics unavailable).

"Immortelle": Ballad about the death by the River Don of a heroic Cossack soldier, his body guarded by a single immortelle or everlasting Helichrysum flower, which according to the lyric does not bend with the wind.[51]

"In a Sunny Forest Clearing": A soldier's love song.[52]

"In the Dugouts"': A soldier in his dugout (shelter) in the snow, sings to his accordion about his girl far away, and feels warm at the thought before he dies.[53]

"Kalinka": A frivolous song about a snowball tree.

"Nightingales" ("Solovii"): The lyric of "Nightingales" asks the nightingale to be quiet as the soldiers are sleeping. The song says that they need to sleep in preparation for the next battle, and there is an implication in the music that they may not come home. It is possible to interpret their next battle in relation to the afterlife, so the audience has the option to infer that they have died. [54] .[55]

"Ogonek": Possibly about a girl and a soldier. It may refer to Ogonyok, (Russian: Огонёк), which means "little flame", as a symbol of love (lyrics unavailable).

"Oh You Rye": A love song (lyrics unavailable).

"Cold Waves Lapping": (lyrics unavailable).

"'Ridna My Mother": (lyrics unavailable).

"Rodina": About the Russian landscape.[56]

"Russian Field"': The Russian landscape as Fatherland.[57]

"Shooting Kommunarov": A war story to give encouragement to fight.[58]

"Sing Soldiers": A hearty song for military morale.[59]

"Song of Russia": The Russian landscape and Vladimir Lenin.[60]

Two Maxim: a machine-gun song (lyrics unavailable).

"Where Are You Now, Friends": About soldiers returning from World War II.[61]

Song arrangements[edit]

Belyaev was a great lyric tenor, but it's Boris Alexandrov's [62] [63] musical arrangement (see Alexandrov Ensemble) which sets off his skill and creates the magic every time. A good example of this is the "Bryansky Partisan Song" with its Eastern Orthodox Church music tonality and harmony, which has the effect of somehow making the Ensemble sound like a choir of thousands, evoking perhaps the size of the USSR, the history which created its peoples, and pride in the Soviet partisans. Belyaev sings the secondary harmony in a duet with Alexei T. Sergeev and the choir here, but his enthusiastic voice adds a piquant excitement to the sheer power of the arrangement. So here is one possible answer to the question of why Belyaev stayed with the Ensemble instead of looking for easy fame on the opera circuit. Musically, it was worth staying.

Recorded songs[edit]

In date order of original recording dates (not album production dates). Some original recordings have been recycled over many albums, and this is still happening - especially with some earlier recordings - due to their continuing popularity.

Troika of Moscow stud performing at Vologda racecourse.

Key to links[edit]

(a): from Japanese "Red Army" webpage, for images of past album sleeves containing tracks by Belyaev.

(b): from Amazon for current albums containing tracks by Belyaev.

In the Central Steppes refers to the vast dry grasslands of Russia.

1950s[edit]

"Oh You Rye" (1950; 1964; 1978; 1992) (composer A. Doluhanyan; lyrics A. Newcomer 1950) (a): [64] [65] [66] [67] [68] [69] [70] [71] [72] (b): [73] [74]

"Choir of Sailors from the Opera Dawn" (1954) (composer K. Molchanov; lyrics S. Severtsov): no data

"Cold Waves Lapping" (1954) (composer F. Bogoroditsky; lyrics Ya Repninsky): no data

"Kalinka" (1956; 1963; 1978; 1992).
(a): [75] [76] [77] [78] [79] [80] [81] [82] [83] [84] [85] [86] [87] [88] [89] [90] [91] [92] [93] [94] [95] [96] [97] [98] [99] [100] [101] [102] [103] [104] [105] [106] [107] [108] [109] (b): [110] [111] [112] [113] [114] [115]

"Annie Laurie" (1956; 1963). (a): [116] [117] [118] [119] [120] [121] [122] (b): [123] [124]

"You Are Always Beautiful" (1956; 1963). (a): [125] [126] [127] [128] [129] [130] [131] [132] [133] [134] [135] [136] [137] [138] (b): [139] [140]

"Forever" (1956; 1963). (a): [141] [142] [143] [144] [145] [146] [147] [148] [149] [150] [151] [152]

"Far Away" (1956) (composer G. Nosov; lyrics A. Churkin 1950). (b): [153] [154]

"Troika" (1959) (Traditional). (a): [155] [156] [157] [158] [159]

Mednyánszky's Fallen Russian Soldier (1914-7), the subject of Nightingale.

1960s[edit]

"Ridna My Mother" (1960) (composer P. Maiboroda; lyrics A. Malyshko): no data

"By Mostochku Narrow" (1960) (composer K. Akimov; lyrics M. Vershinin): no data

"Beautiful Moonlit Night" (or "Moonlight") (1960; 1963). (a): [160] [161] [162] [163] [164] [165] [166] [167] [168] (b): [169] [170]

"Sing Soldiers", or "That Soldier Sings" (1960) (composer A. Doluhanyan; lyrics Nekrasova L. 1955) (a): [171]

"I Will Be a Soldier Again" (1960s?). (a): [172] [173]

"Where Are Your Arms" (1948–65; 1985). (a): [174] [175] [176]

"My Country I Pledge To You" (1963?). (a): [177] [178]

"Nightingales" (1963; 1975; 1978) (composer V.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics A. Fatyanov) (a): [179] [180] [181] [182] [183] [184] [185] [186] (b): [187]

"Near the Garden" (1963). (a): [188]

"Before the Long Journey" (1964) (composer Matvey Blanter; lyrics Vladimir Dyhovichny 1962) (a): [189] [190] [191]

"Song of Russia" (1964) (composer D. Kabalevsky; lyrics A. Newcomer) (a): [192]

"Come My Way" (ca.1965). (a): [193]

"Where This Country Was Built" (1965). (a): [194] [195]

"On a Hill" (1968). (a): [196] [197] [198] [199]

"Gorondorina La"' (1968). (a): [200]

Russian Cruiser Varyag moored in the roadstead 1901. Evening on the Road tells of a peaceful evening such as this.

1970s[edit]

"Russia" (ca.1970). (a): [201] [202]

"Song of the Klintsah" (Oct 1971) (composer A. Kulygin, lyrics A. Annual 1971) broadcast in the USSR on All-Union Radio, to celebrate Belyaev's home town Klintsy .[203] Download here [204] He performed the song in concerts in the Bryansk region in 1975.[205]

"Album:Русские Песни И Романсы"(1973) CM 03831-2.[206]

"'Wilderness" (1974). (a): [207] [208] [209] [210] [211] [212]

The Russian Field (1975) (composer J. Frenkel; lyrics I. Goff 1965) (a): [213]

In My Moscow Suburb (ca.1975?). (a): [214]

In the Dugouts (1975; 1977) (composer K. Sheets ; lyrics A. Surkov 1942): no data

Accidental Waltz (1977) (composer M.Fradkin; lyrics E.Dolmatovskaya): no data

Ogonek (1977) (lyrics M.Isakovsky): no data

My Favourite (1977) (composer M.Blanter; lyrics E.Dolmatovskaya 1942): no data

Two Maxim (1977) (composer S. Katz;[215] lyrics M. Plyatskovsky 1941): no data

You Who Love (1978). (a): [216]

Catalina (1978). (a): [217]

The Birch Tree is a very old, traditional song about a lad sitting under a birch, whittling and thinking of women.

1980s[edit]

Evening on the Waterfront (1985). (a): [218] [219] [220] [221] [222]

Evening on the Road/Night on the Road (undated) (composer V. Solovyov-Sedoy; lyrics A. Churkin 1943). Duet with Boris G. Shapenko)[223]

Execution of the Warrior Revolution (1987) (a): [224] [225]

Donetski Nights is about the Battle of Stalingrad, but the coal-mining city of Donetsk was also destroyed in World War II and then rebuilt, including this cathedral.

1990s[edit]

In the Sunny Meadow/Shine in the Field (1992). (a): [226] (b): [227] [228]

Black Eyebrows (1992). (a): [229] (b): [230] [231]

Happy Girl (1992). (a): [232] (b): [233]

Birch Tree Stood in the Meadow (1992). (a): [234] (b): [235]

In the Forest (1992). (a): [236] (b): [237]

Wait For Your Soldier/Wait a Day to Return (1992). (a): [238] (b): [239] [240]

Motherland/Country (1992). (a): [241] (b): [242]

Undated[edit]

Lying (undated). (a): no data

Take a Bandura (undated). (a): [243] [244]

Our Friends (undated). (a): [245]

Hey Girl (undated). (a): [246]

Rough sea spray (cruiser "VARYAGU") (undated). (a): [247] [248] [249] [250]

The Cruiser Aurora (undated) (music: V.Shainskiy; lyrics: M.Matusovskiy)[251]

Soldier's Wife (undated). (a): [252]

Epitaph (undated). (a): [253]

In the Central Steppes (undated). (b): [254]

Baikal Beauty (undated) (composer A. Doluhanyan; lyrics M. Lisyansky): no data

Immortelle (undated) (composer S. Zaslavsky ; lyrics A. Sofronov): no data

Donetski Night (undated) (composer E. Zharkovsky; lyrics N.Upenik, L.Titova 1975): no data

Where Are You Now, Friends (undated) (composer V. Solovyov-Sedoy; lyrics A. Fatyanov 1947): no data

And Again I am In Line (undated) (composer B. Muradeli ; lyrics S. Bencken 1960): no data

Favourite, Remember Us (undated) (composer Boris Alexandrov ; lyrics N. Dobronravov 1978): no data

In a Sunny Forest Clearing (undated) (composer V.P.Solovev-Sedoy; lyrics A. Fatyanov 1970): no data

Bryansky Partisan Song (undated) (composer D. Kabalevsky; lyrics V.Lebedev-Kumach). Duet with Alexei T. Sergeev: no data .[255]

I Took You Into the Tundra refers to the cold, treeless zone all along the northern edge of Russia.

Shooting Kommunarov (undated) (composer V.Tan-Bogoraz): no data

Rodina (undated) (composer A. Samoylov; lyrics F. Savinov): no data

Click the Guy (undated) (composer LA Shats; lyrics V. Alferov 1977): no data

At the Gate, The Gate (undated) (traditional): no data

I Left the Army (undated) (composer S. Tulika; lyrics V. Malkov): no data

I Loved You (undated) (composer B.Sheremetyev; lyrics Pushkin): no data

I Met You (undated) (composer B.Sheremetyev; lyrics F.Tyutchev): no data

It Evokes Memories (undated) (composer P.Bulakhov): no data

I Took You into the Tundra (undated) (composer M. Fradkin; lyrics M. Plyatskovsky): no data .[256]

Listen If You Want (undated) (composer N.Shiskin): no data

My Moscow (undated) (composer O. Feltsman; lyrics A. Sofronov): no data

Separation (undated) (composer A.Gurilev; lyrics A.Koltsov): no data

Soldiers' Mothers (undated) (composer Boris Alexandrov; lyrics S. Bencken): no data

Soldiers Pribautki (undated) (composer A. Doluhanyan; lyrics G. Hodos). Duet with B. Ruslanov: no data

Unselfish Soul (undated) (composer A. Pakhmutova; lyrics M. Lisyansky): no data

We Went Out Into the Garden (undated) (composer M.Tolstoy; lyrics A.Butt): no data

The Book Motherland (undated) (composer Boris Alexandrov ; lyrics N. Dorizo): no data

Kid (undated) (Spanish): no data

To You I Swear the Fatherland (undated): no data

The Alexandrov Ensemble performs numerous songs about Moscow, including My Moscow, which was recorded with E. Belyaev as soloist.

Discography[edit]

His 78s, LPs, CDs and DVDs are listed on the Alexandrov Ensemble discography page.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ image of Belyaev
  2. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide: "Russian Nightingale" at end of article
  3. ^ Translated Sci-lib biography
  4. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide: Evgeny referred to as Zhenia
  5. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide 2007 Artek Camp story
  6. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: biography of Belyaev
  7. ^ Translated biog of Belyaev
  8. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide 2007: Biography of Belyaev
  9. ^ Translated Sci-lib biography of Belyaev
  10. ^ Information from Leonid Kharitonov, who sang with him in the 1960s.
  11. ^ Translated Sci-lib biography of Belyaev
  12. ^ Translated Sci-lib biography of Belyaev
  13. ^ Translated Sci-lib biography of Belyaev
  14. ^ Translated biog of Belyaev
  15. ^ Information from Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov, fellow soloist in the Ensemble.
  16. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide 2007: Honoured Artist of Russia
  17. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide 2007: People's Artist of Russia
  18. ^ Translated Sci-lib biography: People's Artist of the USSR
  19. ^ Translated RUVR Voice of Russia: Alexandrov Ensemble
  20. ^ Translated USSR 1977 concert announcement and images of Belyaev
  21. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide: Biography of Belyaev
  22. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide 2007: State Prize of the USSR
  23. ^ Translated Navoprosotveta webpage biography of Belyaev
  24. ^ Translated Jazzdixie webpage biography of Oleg Leonidovich Lundstrem
  25. ^ Translated Lundstrem-Jazz webpage biography of Lundstrem; short descrip. of orchestra
  26. ^ Translated Russian Wikipedia page: Pif Paf Oi Oi Oi (Пиф Паф Ой Ой Ой)
  27. ^ Translated Russian blog, citing Belyaev as voice-over for Rabbit
  28. ^ See History of Russian animation and Garri Bardin. However the Rabbit voice in the cartoon is definitely Belyaev's, but apparently Bardin's Rabbit was sung by a woman, so the cartoon voice-overed by E.B. was by a different director?
  29. ^ Information from Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov, who knew him.
  30. ^ Translated admin.debryansk.ru webpage: Bryansk news, praising Belyaev, 2006
  31. ^ Translated Japanese webpage: Biography of Belyaev
  32. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide 2007: Biography of Belyaev
  33. ^ Information from Leonid Mikhailovich Kharitonov, a fellow soloist who knew him.
  34. ^ See also Russian Wikipedia article on Novodevichy Cemetery
  35. ^ look at No.106
  36. ^ D1106. ISBN 0-7697-8690-1. B0013N3LIG, published by Kultur, ca.1960, dir: I. Jugashvili. Musical dir: Boris Alexandrov, filmed in the USSR. See Alexandrov Ensemble discography for further details.
  37. ^ Important: Please read the section "Critical Commentaries" on the article's discussion page before editing this commentary. Thank you.
  38. ^ Translated Sci-lib: lyric tenor
  39. ^ Belyaev singing "Nightingale" on Russian channel on YouTube
  40. ^ Translated Bryansk Guide 2007: decision to install bust of Belyaev
  41. ^ Translated Klintsy webpage 14 Feb 2007: plans for bust of Belyaev in Klintsy
  42. ^ Translated Official Site of the Communist Party: naming of school after Belyaev
  43. ^ Translated Russian concert announcement 1977: "National treasure"
  44. ^ Translated lyrics of And Again I am in Line via left hand button
  45. ^ Translated lyrics of Baikal Beauty via left hand button
  46. ^ Translated lyrics of Before the Long Journey via left hand button
  47. ^ Translated lyrics of Bryanski Partisan Song via left hand button
  48. ^ Source: sovmusic.ru
  49. ^ Translated lyrics of Evening on the Road via left hand button
  50. ^ Translated lyrics of Far Far Away via left hand button
  51. ^ Translated lyrics of Immortelle via left hand button
  52. ^ Translated lyrics of In a Sunny Forest Clearing via left-hand button for "At Solar"
  53. ^ Translated lyrics of In the Dugouts via left hand button
  54. ^ Armchairgeneral: original Russian lyrics of "Nightingale"
  55. ^ Armchairgeneral: Russian-English translation of "Nightingale" Translated via Google Translate Tool.
  56. ^ Translated lyrics of Rodina via left hand button
  57. ^ Translated lyrics of Russian Field via left hand button
  58. ^ Translated lyrics of Shooting Kommunarov via left hand button
  59. ^ Translated lyrics of Sing Soldiers via left hand button
  60. ^ Translated lyrics of Song of Russia via left hand button
  61. ^ Translated lyrics of Where Are You Now, Friends via left hand button
  62. ^ In Russian: Alexandrov Ensemble webpage on Boris Alexandrov
  63. ^ Translated Alexandrov Ensemble webpage on Boris Alexandrov
  64. ^ Album: Moscow nights WPCC-5349
  65. ^ Album: Russian Folk Songs VICP-41059
  66. ^ Album: Japanese LP VICS-60006
  67. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge Vol.3 WMD242070
  68. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge CD 74321423482
  69. ^ Album: Russian disk C-431-2
  70. ^ Album: Russian disk 33C20-08027-30
  71. ^ Album: Songs By Soviet Authors 33C60-05689-90
  72. ^ Album: Bomba Music Best Folk Songs BoMB 033-205
  73. ^ (Amazon) Album: Moscow Nights B000000SKZ
  74. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble D1106
  75. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Sovietique 274.768
  76. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble Military Music MAR-RAM1967
  77. ^ Album: Russian disk 33C20-08027-30
  78. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army C60-08163-6
  79. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army 33C-04649-50
  80. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army C90-5661-2
  81. ^ Album: Russian LP set 33C60-11207-10
  82. ^ Album: Russian Folk Songs C20-13171 007
  83. ^ Album: Moonlight Over Moscow 74321-32043-2
  84. ^ Album: Russischen Volkslieder (German) GD69063
  85. ^ Album: Japanese disk from Victor VDP-1164
  86. ^ Album: Russian Folk Songs VDP-5189
  87. ^ Album: Russian Folk Songs VICP-40054/55
  88. ^ Album: Russian Sound ARIOSO350
  89. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army C-01235-6
  90. ^ Album: Soviet Army Chorus and Band CDC-7478332
  91. ^ Album: Red Army Favourites HMV5730452
  92. ^ Album: Volga Boat Song, Soviet Army Chorus and Band CC30-9078
  93. ^ Album: The Best of EMI Classics: Russia TOCE-55513
  94. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge CD 8334342
  95. ^ Album: Russian CD MKM117
  96. ^ Album: Kalinka, Favourite Songs Forever MKM132
  97. ^ Album: The Soviet Army Ensemble 33C1049
  98. ^ Album: Soviet Army Chorus and Band CD S35411
  99. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble CD 094639203024
  100. ^ Album: Russian Folk Songs VICP-41004
  101. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge WM242050
  102. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge CD 74321423482
  103. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge 0927465012
  104. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Red Army Chorus 70th Anniversary AA980001-2
  105. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Red Army 70th Ann. 1928-78 AA970001
  106. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Red Army Horus (sic) 4606777003976
  107. ^ Album: Bomba Best Folk Songs, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army BoMB 033-205
  108. ^ Album: The Red Army Ensemble Vol.2 S36143
  109. ^ Album: Kalinka, Red Star Army Chorus WPCC-5121
  110. ^ (Amazon) Album: Kalinka B000O6AQUO
  111. ^ (Amazon) Album: Kalinka B00000EXB5
  112. ^ (Amazon) Album: Red Star: Red Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble (1992) B000ETRA2S
  113. ^ (Amazon) Album: Best of the Red Army Choir B000066RMJ
  114. ^ EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4
  115. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106
  116. ^ Album: Soviet Army Chorus and Band CDC-7478332
  117. ^ Album: Red Army Favourites HMV5730452
  118. ^ Album: Volga Boat Song, Soviet Army Chorus and Band CC30-9078
  119. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge CD 8334342
  120. ^ Album: Russian CD MKM117
  121. ^ Album: The Red Army Ensemble Vol.2 S36143
  122. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble CD 094639203024
  123. ^ CD: EMI: Soviet Army Chorus & Band, CDC-7-47833-2 (DIDX-1015)
  124. ^ EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4
  125. ^ Album: Soviet Army Chorus and Band CD CDC-7478332
  126. ^ Album: Red Army Favourites, Soviet Army Chorus and Band HMV5730452
  127. ^ Album: Volga Boat Song, Soviet Army Chorus and Band CC30-9078
  128. ^ Album: The Best of EMI Classics, Russia TOCE-55513
  129. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge CD 8334342
  130. ^ Album: Russian CD MKM117
  131. ^ Album: Kalinka, Favourite Songs Forever, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble MKM132
  132. ^ Album: The Soviet Army Ensemble 33C1049
  133. ^ Album: Soviet Army Chorus and Band S35411
  134. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble CD 094639203024
  135. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble, Military Music 2 x CDs MAR-RAM1967
  136. ^ Album: Red Army Choir CD MELCD60-01335
  137. ^ Album: The Red Army Ensemble Vol.2 S36143
  138. ^ Album: Bomba, Best Lyric Songs, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army BoMB 033-204
  139. ^ CD: EMI: Soviet Army Chorus & Band, CDC-7-47833-2 (DIDX-1015)
  140. ^ EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4
  141. ^ Album: Soviet Army Chorus and Band CD CDC-7478332
  142. ^ Album: Red Army Favourites, Soviet Army Chorus and Band HMV5730452
  143. ^ Album: Volga Boat Song, Soviet Army Chorus and Band CC30-9078
  144. ^ Album: The Best of EMI Classics, Russia TOCE-55513
  145. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge 8334342
  146. ^ Album: Russian disk MKM117
  147. ^ Album: Kalinka, Favourite Songs Forever, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble MKM132
  148. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble, Military Music 2 x CDs MAR-RAM1967
  149. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Red Army Chorus, 70th Anniversary AA980001-2
  150. ^ Album: The Soviet Army Ensemble Vol.1 33C1049
  151. ^ Album: Soviet Army Chorus and Band S35411
  152. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble CD 094639203024
  153. ^ CD: EMI: Soviet Army Chorus & Band, CDC-7-47833-2 (DIDX-1015)
  154. ^ EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4
  155. ^ Album: The Red Army Choir, The Definitive Anthology 4 x CDs 3070312
  156. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge 4 x CDs 583 849-2
  157. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge, Anniversary 1928-2003, 2 x CDs 3089722
  158. ^ Album: Le Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge, Integrale, 4 x CDs AUS040504-5780912
  159. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge, 2 x CDs, AUS040505-5780822
  160. ^ Album: Moonlight Over Moscow, A Festival of Russian Folk Song, Red Army Chorus, 74321-32043-2
  161. ^ Album: Russischen Volkslieder CD, GD69063
  162. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, CD, 33C-04649-50
  163. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge 8334342
  164. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble, Military Music, 2 x CDs, MAR-RAM1967
  165. ^ Album: The Red Army Ensemble Vol.2, S36143
  166. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army C-01235-6
  167. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble CD, 094639203024
  168. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble ST51182
  169. ^ EMI Classics: Red Army Ensemble, 0946-3-92030-2-4
  170. ^ DVD: Kultur: Soviet Army Chorus and Dance Ensemble, D1106
  171. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble ST51182
  172. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble 33CM01971-72
  173. ^ Album: Bomba, Patriotic Songs, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, 2 x CDs, BoMB 033-202/203
  174. ^ Album: Wartime Choruses, In Memory of 9th May 1945, MCD207
  175. ^ Album: Russian disk, 50yr anniversary 1945-95, MELCD60-00615
  176. ^ Album: Songs of Wartime, 40yr anniversary 1945-1984 (sic), C60-21657 009
  177. ^ Album: Bomba, Patriotic Songs, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, BoMB 033-202/203
  178. ^ Album: Russian LP, 33C60-06133-34
  179. ^ Album: Wartime Choruses, in memory of 9th May 1945, MCD207
  180. ^ Album: Russian CD, possibly for 50th Anniversary or 1928 or 1945, RDCD00434
  181. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble, Military Music 2 x CDs, MAR-RAM1967
  182. ^ Album: Russian disk, 2 x LPs, 33C20-08027-30
  183. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army C60-08163-6
  184. ^ Album: Russian Disk: 50th Anniversary 1928-78, 2 x LPs, 33C60-11207-10
  185. ^ Album: Russian disk, 60th anniversary 1945-2005 CD, MELCD60-00938
  186. ^ Album: Bomba, Best Lyric Songs, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, BoMB 033-204
  187. ^ CD: Melodiya: Sacred War (in Russian), MELCD60-00938/1
  188. ^ Album: Red Army Ensemble, Military Music, 2 x CDs, MAR-RAM1967
  189. ^ Album: Russian disk, C-431-2
  190. ^ Album: Bomba, Best Lyric Songs, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, BoMB 033-204
  191. ^ Album: Red Army Choir CD, MELCD60-01335
  192. ^ Album: Russian disk, C-431-2
  193. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, 33CM01829-30
  194. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, 33CM01829-30
  195. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, C90-5661-2
  196. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, C-01235-6
  197. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, 33C-04649-50
  198. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, SH-7699
  199. ^ Album: Bomba, Best Folk Songs, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, BoMB 033-205
  200. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, SH-7688
  201. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, CM02873-4
  202. ^ Album: Russian LP, 50th anniversary of foundation of Ensemble 1928-78, 33C60-11207-10
  203. ^ Bryansk Guide webpage Apr 2007: Song of the Klintsah
  204. ^ [1]
  205. ^ Translated biog of Belyaev
  206. ^ [2]
  207. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge, 2 x CDs, 533 536-2
  208. ^ Album: The Red Army Choir, The Definitive Anthology, 4 x CDs, 3070312
  209. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge, 4 x CDs, 583 849-2
  210. ^ Album: The Best of the Red Army Choir, The Definitive Collection, 2 x CDs, SILKD6034
  211. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge, Integrale, 4 x CDs, AUS040504-5780912
  212. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Red Army Chorus, 70th anniversary 1928-1998, 2 x CDs, AA980001
  213. ^ Album: Japanese 5 x CD set, VICS-60006-10
  214. ^ Album: Russian 2 x CD set, CM03181-2
  215. ^ Narod.ru webpage: Biography of Zigmund Katz who composed "Two Maxim".
  216. ^ Album: Russian LP, 50th anniversary 1928-78, 33C60-11207-10
  217. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, 2 x CDs, C60-08163-6
  218. ^ Album: Wartime Choruses in Memory of 9th May 1945, MCD207
  219. ^ Album: Russian CD, 50th anniversary (1945-95?), RDCD00434
  220. ^ Album: Japanese 5 x CD set, VICS-60006-10
  221. ^ Album: Bomba, Patriotic Songs, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, 2 x CDs, BoMB 033-202/203
  222. ^ Album: Red Army Choir CD, MELCD60-01335
  223. ^ Evening/Night on the Road may be identical with Evening on the Waterfront: no evidence either way.
  224. ^ Album: A Programme of Revolutionary Songs, 1917-87, 70yrs, MCD203
  225. ^ Album: Echoes of a Red Empire, Russians Songs of Struggle from the Great Revolution and Second World War, CD, JASMCD2576
  226. ^ Album: Kalinka, Red Star Army Chorus, CD, WPCC-5121
  227. ^ (Amazon) Album: Kalinka, CD, B000O6AQUO
  228. ^ (Amazon) Album: Kalinka, Cassette, B00000EXB5
  229. ^ Album: Kalinka, Red Star Army Chorus CD, WPCC-5121
  230. ^ (Amazon) Album: Kalinka, Red Star Army Chorus CD, B000O6AQUO
  231. ^ (Amazon) Album: Kalinka, Cassette, B00000EXB5
  232. ^ Album: Moscow Nights, Red Star Red Army Chorus WPCC-5349
  233. ^ (Amazon) Album: Moscow Nights, Red Star Red Army Chorus CD B000000SKZ
  234. ^ Album: Moscow Nights, Red Star Red Army Chorus WPCC-5349
  235. ^ (Amazon) Album: Moscow Nights, Red Star Red Army Chorus CD B000000SKZ
  236. ^ Album: Moscow Nights, Red Star Red Army Chorus, WPCC-5349
  237. ^ (Amazon) Album: Moscow Nights, Red Star Red Army Chorus CD, B000000SKZ
  238. ^ Album: Kalinks, Red Star Red Army Chorus, WPCC-5121
  239. ^ (Amazon) Album: Kalinka, Red Star Red Army Chorus CD, WPCC-5121
  240. ^ (Amazon) Album: Kalinka, Cassette, B00000EXB5
  241. ^ Album: Moscow Nights, Red Star Red Army Chorus, WPCC-5349
  242. ^ (Amazon) Album: Moscow Nights, Red Star Red Army Chorus CD, B000000SKZ
  243. ^ Album: The Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, C-01235-6
  244. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army CD, 33C-04649-50
  245. ^ Album: Bomba, Best Lyric Songs, Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, CD, BoMB 033-204
  246. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, C-01235-6
  247. ^ Album: Russian Folk Songs, 2 x CDs, VICP-41059-60
  248. ^ Album, Japanese 5 x CD set, VICS-60006-10
  249. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Rouge, 2 x CDs, 74321423482
  250. ^ Album: Alexandrov Red Army Chorus, 70th anniversary 1928-98, 2 x CDs, AA980001-2
  251. ^ "Cruiser Aurora" could be the same song as "Rough Sea Spray (Cruiser Varyagu)"
  252. ^ Album: Alexandrov Song and Dance Ensemble of the Soviet Army, 33CM-02137-38
  253. ^ Album: Les Choeurs de L'Armee Sovietique, 274.768
  254. ^ Silva Classics: The Best of the Red Army Choir, SILKD6034
  255. ^ It has been disputed whether the tenor here is Belyaev; but no evidence to the contrary has yet been found.
  256. ^ It is disputed whether this is Belyaev's voice; no evidence for a different tenor has yet been found.

External links[edit]