Ewing Y. Freeland

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Ewing Y. Freeland
EYFreeland.jpg
Freeland pictured in La Ventana 1927, Texas Tech yearbook
Sport(s) Football, basketball, baseball
Biographical details
Born (1887-01-01)January 1, 1887
Turnersville, Texas
Died August 15, 1963(1963-08-15) (aged 76)
Brownwood, Texas
Playing career
Football
1908–1911

Vanderbilt
Position(s) Tackle (football)
First baseman (baseball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1915
1919–1920
1921
1922–1923
1925–1928
1936–1938

Basketball
1915–1916
1921–1922

Baseball
1916
1923–1924
1926–1927

TCU
Austin
Millsaps
SMU
Texas Tech
Austin


TCU
Millsaps


TCU
SMU
Texas Tech
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1925–1927
1935–1938
Texas Tech
Austin
Head coaching record
Overall 41–23–8 (football)
2–11 (basketball)
50–47–3 (baseball)
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 SWC (1923)

Ewing Young "Big 'un" Freeland (January 1, 1887 – August 15, 1953) was an American football and baseball player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at Texas Christian University (1915), Millsaps College (1921), Southern Methodist University (1922–1923, with Ray Morrison), and Texas Tech University (1925–1928), compiling a career college football record of 41–23–8. Freeland was also the head basketball coach at TCU for one season in 1915–16 and at Millsaps for one season in 1921–22. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at TCU (1916), SMU (1923–1924), and Texas Tech (1926–1927), amassing a career college baseball record of 50–47–3.

Freeland was born on January 1, 1887 in Turnersville, Texas and died on August 15, 1953 in Brownwood, Texas.[1] He played football and baseball at Vanderbilt University, from which he graduated in 1912. In 1915, Freeland coached football at TCU, compiling a 4–5 record. In 1922 and 1923, Freeland co-coached the SMU Mustangs football team with his former teammate at Vanderbilt, Ray Morrison. The two effectively shared the heading coaching duties, with Morrison focusing on the backfield and ends, and Freeland mentoring the linemen.[2] In 1925, Freeland became the first coach of the Texas Tech Red Raiders football team, then known then as the Matadors. He coached football at Texas Tech from 1925 to 1928, where he had a 21–10–6 record. Freeland was also the first head coach of the Texas Tech Red Raiders baseball team and Texas Tech's first athletic director.[3] He is credited with designing Texas Tech's Double T logo and had it put on the sweaters of football players.[4]

The older version of Texas Tech's Double-T logo

Head coaching record[edit]

Baseball[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
TCU Horned Frogs (1916)
1916 TCU 9–7
TCU: 9–7
SMU Mustangs (Southwest Conference) (1923–1924)
1923 SMU 16–10 14–6 2nd
1924 SMU 10–19 5–16 6th
SMU: 26–25 19–22
Texas Tech Matadors (1926–1927)
1926 Texas Tech 11–2–1
1927 Texas Tech 4–9–1
Texas Tech: 15–11–2
Total: 50–43–2

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
TCU Horned Frogs (Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1915)
1915 TCU 4–5
TCU: 4–5
Millsaps Majors (Independent) (1921)
1921 Millsaps 1–5–1
Millsaps: 1–5–1
SMU Mustangs (Southwest Conference) (1922–1923)
1922 SMU 6–3–1 2–2 T–3rd
1923 SMU 9–0 5–0 1st
SMU: 15–3–1 7–2
Texas Tech Matadors (Independent) (1925–1928)
1925 Texas Tech 6–1–2
1926 Texas Tech 6–1–3
1927 Texas Tech 5–4
1928 Texas Tech 4–4–1
Texas Tech: 21–10–6 18–15–1
Total: 41–23–8
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Youngs-Ireland, Pennsylvania, Alabama, Texas". Ancestry.com. Retrieved April 2, 2011. 
  2. ^ NEA Service (December 21, 1923). "Texas Turns Out Latest Wonder Team of Gridion". Evening Independent. Retrieved April 2, 2011. 
  3. ^ Andrews, Ruth Horn (1956). The First Thirty Years: a History of Texas Technological College. Lubbock, Texas: The Texas Tech Press. p. 298. 
  4. ^ "Double T Symbol". Texas Tech University. Retrieved September 24, 2008. 

External links[edit]