Executive branch of the government of Puerto Rico

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Coat of arms of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Puerto Rico

The executive branch of the government of Puerto Rico is responsible for executing the laws of Puerto Rico, as well as causing them to be executed. Article IV of the Constitution of Puerto Rico vests the executive power on the Governor—whom by its nature forms the executive branch.[1]

The Constitution also establishes that the Secretary of State should serve as acting governor when the Governor is unable to perform his duties.[2] The Secretary of State, therefore, performs an equivalent role to that of a Lieutenant Governor in United States politics.

The Puerto Rico Chief of Staff is second-in-command and manages and oversees all executive departments and almost all executive agencies.

Article IV also establishes that the Governor shall be assisted by Secretaries whom shall collectively constitute the Governor's advisory council and be designated as the Council of Secretaries.[3] The Council, together with the Cabinet-level officers, compose the Cabinet of Puerto Rico.

The Constitution created eight executive departments.[4] Later on, the Legislative Assembly reorganized one of these, and created and reorganized a few more. Today, the executive branch is composed of fifteen executive departments each headed by a Secretary.[5]

Executive posts[edit]

Governor[edit]

Article IV of the Constitution of Puerto Rico vests the executive power on the Governor.[1] The Governor has a duty to enforce state laws, to convene the Legislative Assembly, the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Legislative Assembly, to appoint government officers, to appoint Justices, and to grant pardons.

Lieutenant Governor[edit]

Puerto Rico does not have a post for lieutenant governor but the Secretary of State performs an equivalent role. Article IV of the Constitution of Puerto Rico establishes that the Secretary of State should serve as acting governor when the Governor is unable to perform his duties.[2] The Constitution and Puerto Rican law establishes a governmental line of succession for special cases when neither the Governor nor the Secretary are available.[6][7][8]

Chief of Staff[edit]

Neither the Constitution of Puerto Rico nor Puerto Rican law provide for a Chief of Staff position. However, Governors proclaim an executive order establishing the post for the Puerto Rico Chief of Staff who is charged with managing and overseeing all executive departments and almost all executive agencies.

Executive offices[edit]

The executive branch is led by the Office of the Governor of Puerto Rico which consists of the immediate staff to the Governor as well as multiple levels of support. All other executive offices are ascribed to the Office of the Governor. The Governor, however, delegates the management and overwatch of almost all the executive offices to the Secretariat of Governance and the Chief of Staff; being the Office of Management and Budget and the Planning Board the only executive offices that report directly to the Governor.[why?] The executive offices are comprised by:[5]

Secretaries[edit]

The Council of Secretaries is the group composed by the heads of the executive departments of the government of Puerto Rico. The Council is charged with leading the different sectors of public administration within the government and is comprised by:

Departments[edit]

There are currently fifteen executive departments; all of them equivalent to that of ministries in parliamentary systems. Each executive department is responsible of a specific sector of public administration and provides a related public service to the citizens of Puerto Rico. All departments are capable of generating revenue through the issuance of fines, or through the collection of license fees and taxes. These revenues are then allocated to the government's primary operating fund: the Puerto Rico General Fund. The current departments are:

Fiscal agent and financing[edit]

The fiscal agent and financing agencies are a group of government-owned corporations of Puerto Rico that manage all aspects of financing for the executive branch. The Puerto Rico Government Development Bank Act establishes that the Puerto Rico Government Development Bank (GDB) serves as the fiscal agent of the government of Puerto Rico.[9] Regardless of its special status, the GDB and all other financing agencies report to the Secretariat of Governance and the Chief of Staff. These agencies are comprised by:

Government-owned corporations[edit]

The government-owned corporations of Puerto Rico are autonomous, independent, and self-sufficient legal entities owned entirely or in large by the executive branch. These corporations engage in commercial activities with their revenues ultimately being allocated towards the government's treasury: the Puerto Rico Consolidated Fund. As of December 2012, the executive branch owned 50 government-owned corporations as follows:[5][10][11]

Other agencies[edit]

There are other agencies that belong to the executive branch that aren't either executive offices, executive departments, subagencies, nor government-owned corporations. These agencies tend to be regulatory bodies or agencies that provide some sort of public service whose goal is not commercial profit. Regardless of their purpose, these agencies report to the Secretariat of Governance and the Chief of Staff, and some of them are even presided by a cabinet-level officer. This group of agencies is comprised by:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Presided by a Cabinet-level officer.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Article IV, Section 1, Constitution of Puerto Rico (1952). Retrieved on December 28, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Article IV, Section 8, Constitution of Puerto Rico (1952). Retrieved on December 28, 2012.
  3. ^ Article IV, Section 5, Constitution of Puerto Rico (1952). Retrieved on December 28, 2012.
  4. ^ Article IV, Section 6, Constitution of Puerto Rico (1952). Retrieved on December 28, 2012.
  5. ^ a b c d "Organigrama del Gobierno de Puerto Rico" (PDF) (in Spanish). Puerto Rico Office of Management and Budget. April 2012. Retrieved November 18, 2012. 
  6. ^ Article IV, Section 7, Constitution of Puerto Rico (1952). Retrieved on December 28, 2012.
  7. ^ Article IV, Section 9, Constitution of Puerto Rico (1952). Retrieved on December 28, 2012.
  8. ^ Act No. 7 of 1952 (in Spanish)
  9. ^ Puerto Rico Government Development Bank Act, Act No. 17 of 1948 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 28, 2012.
  10. ^ Méndez, Jesús; Chevres, Jaysel (2011), Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Year Ended June 30, 2011, Department of Treasury of Puerto Rico, pp. 71–83, retrieved 25 November 2012 
  11. ^ "Directorio de Agencias" (in Spanish). Government of Puerto Rico. Retrieved December 28, 2012.