ExoPC

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divesh Slate[1]
ExoPC-Color-Logo.png
Developer EXOPC
Manufacturer Pegatron
Type Tablet
Release date October 2010 (2010-10)
Media SD/SDHC card-reader (32 GB max)
Operating system Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium, 32-bit Edition
CPU Intel Atom Pineview-M N450, 1.66 GHz – 64-bit support
Memory 2 GB DDR2 SDRAM
Storage 32 GB or 64 GB SSD hard drive
Display 11.6-inch (diagonal), 1366 × 768 resolution, 16:9 ratio, 135 pixels per inch
Graphics Intel GMA 3150 and Broadcom Crystal HD
Input Multi-touch capacitive dual-touch, pressure-sensitive
Camera 1.3 megapixel
Connectivity Bluetooth 2.1 and EDR
Wireless Wifi 802.11 b/g/n
Power 4-hour battery [2]
Online services App store
Dimensions 11.6 × 7.7 × 0.55 inches
(295 × 195 × 14.0 mm)
Weight 2.09 pounds (950 g)

The EXOPC is a Tablet PC, in slate form, that uses Windows 7 Home Premium as its operating system, and is designed by the company of the same name, based in Quebec, Canada.[3] The EXOPC Slate is manufactured by Pegatron.[4] The first EXOPC slate was launched in October 2010[when?] directly from EXOPC Corp. on their website, and in Canada through the company Hypertechnologie Ciara.[5] Hypertechnologie Ciara markets the slate under the name Ciara Vibe.[6] Probitas markets the EXOPC as Mobi-One in Southern Europe and North Africa.[7] RM Education markets the EXOPC in the UK as the RM Slate. Leader Computers markets the EXOPC in Australia. The EXOPC Slate is also currently[when?] available in the United States via the Microsoft Store, both online and in stores. Mustek markets it as the Mecer Lucid Slate in South Africa.

Hardware[edit]

The architecture is based on an Intel Atom-M Pineview N450 CPU that is clocked at 1.66 GHz, and includes 2 GB of DDR2 SDRAM and 32 GB of solid-state drive (SSD) storage in its basic version, with an alternative model having a larger 64 GB SSD.

The EXOPC is also equipped with an accelerometer, which lets the display change from a portrait mode to a landscape mode by turning the slate in either direction. Internally it has four mini-PCIe slots of which three provide space for full-length cards and one half length. Three of these slots are in use and the fourth is available, but intended for a WWAN card. The unit also provides a SIM card slot.

Display[edit]

The EXOPC has an 11.6-inch diagonal, capacitive multi-touch screen. The screen has a resolution of 1366 × 768 pixels (WXGA), a 16:9 ratio, and has 135 pixels per inch. The screen's firmware currently allows detection of two points of simultaneous touch, but is technically capable of up to 10 points of touch.

A light sensor built into the front of the tablet automatically adjusts the display brightness to ambient condition.

It is also possible to use a capacitive stylus for precision work, such as hand-drawn art and graphic works.

Connectivity[edit]

The EXOPC offers connectivity equivalent to that of a standard laptop:

External power supply[edit]

Recharging the battery is done through a standard external power supply:[8]

  • Size: 85 mm × 33 mm × 25 mm (3.4 × 1.3 × 1.0 inches)
  • Weight: 950 grams (33.51 oz)
  • Input: 100–240 V
  • Output: 19 V, 2.1 amperes

Software features[edit]

Operating system[edit]

The EXOPC uses Microsoft Windows 7 as its operating system. The company has developed a GUI interface around the standard Windows 7 GUI, nicknamed by the EXOPC community as the Connect Four Interface due to its full screen of interactive circles arranged in a grid pattern.[9] A dedicated button on the touch-screen interface will minimize the EXOPC layer and reveal the Windows 7 desktop, allowing the user to have the EXOPC Slate act as a standard Windows computer when needed.

Applications[edit]

Pre-installed applications[edit]

The EXOPC comes with the following pre-installed applications:

Store-specific applications[edit]

An application library, similar to the Apple App Store or the Android Market is available for the device, accessible through the EXOPC UI.

Feedback[edit]

The tablet captured the attention of several blogs and websites in the summer of 2010, being heralded as a possible alternative to the iPad.[10] However, early reviews criticized the weight and battery life of the final product,[11] as well as many missing features, the interface itself, sluggishness of the Internet browser, and difficulties to use the on-screen keyboard.[12]

See also[edit]

  • WeTab – German version with the MeeGo-OS, and similar hardware

References[edit]

  1. ^ "EXOPC Slate". EXOPC. Retrieved 2010-08-18. 
  2. ^ "Exo U - The Unifying Platform". exou.com. Retrieved 2012-08-21. 
  3. ^ "EXO U - The Unifying Platform". exou.com. Retrieved 2012-08-21. 
  4. ^ "EXOPC slate delayed thanks to Pegatron assembly line issue". slipperybrick.com. 2010-10-04. Retrieved 2010-11-13. 
  5. ^ "Ciara Technologies". Ciara-tech.com. Retrieved 2012-08-21. 
  6. ^ "EXOPC Community Forum • Index page". exou.com. Retrieved 2012-08-21. 
  7. ^ "MOBI ONE "Windows 8® Ready" - MOBILAND - Probitas | International Online Computer Store". Probitas.pt. Retrieved 2012-08-21. 
  8. ^ Buy power supply PSU for EXOPC Ciara Vibe leader slate
  9. ^ "EXOPC Slate hands-on". Engadget. 2010-05-30. Retrieved 2010-11-13. 
  10. ^ "EXOPC Slate Hands-On: The Windows 7 Tablet We’ve Been Waiting For". laptopmag.com. 2010-06-02. Retrieved 2010-11-13. 
  11. ^ "EXOPC Slate Hands-On: The Windows 7 Tablet We’ve Been Waiting For". netbooknews.com. 2010-11-11. Retrieved 2010-11-13. The biggest draw back [sic] of the system so far appears to be battery life and that they are asking you to be patient while they work with their community to built [sic] a tablet everyone will love. 
  12. ^ "EXOPC Slate review". Engadget. 2010-10-27. Retrieved 2010-11-13. Microsoft's lacking consumer touch features, it's not anywhere close to done, and thus requires Windows 7 to fully operate. Yet ultimately, it's Windows 7 -- and the power-hungry parts needed to run it -- that end up crippling the EXOPC the most.(...)With that said, $599 is a lot of money to bet on a platform that isn't ready and a piece of hardware that must be plugged into the wall for the better part of the day 

External links[edit]