Expedia (website)

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This article is about the travel website. For the company, see Expedia, Inc..
Expedia.com
Expedia logo.svg
The logo for Expedia.com
Web address www.expedia.com (U.S.)
www.expedia.ca (Canada)
www.expedia.co.uk (U.K.)
www.expedia.com.au (Australia)
expedia.co.nz (New Zealand)
www.expedia.it (Italy)
www.expedia.fr (France)
www.expedia.de (Germany)
Commercial? Yes
Type of site Internet booking engine
Registration Yes
Available in English
Owner Expedia, Inc.
Launched 2001
Alexa rank positive decrease 515 (April 2014)[1]
Current status Active

Expedia is an Internet-based travel website company headquartered in Bellevue, Washington, with localized sites for 30 countries: (Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Philippines, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, UK, US, Vietnam). Created by Rich Barton and Lloyd Frink. It books airline tickets, hotel reservations, car rentals, cruises, vacation packages and various attractions and services via the World Wide Web and telephone travel agents. The site uses multiple global distribution systems like Amadeus or the Sabre reservation systems for flights and for hotels, Worldspan and Pegasus, along with its own hotel reservation system for contracted, bulk-rate reservations. This last is shared with other Expedia, Inc. sites.[2]

In December 2010, listings for AMR Corporation, parent of American Airlines and American Eagle Airlines, were removed from Expedia's site. The decision resulted from a dispute over the degree of access to the site's customers.[3] AMR reversed its decision in April 2011, allowing tickets to once again be sold through the aggregate site.[citation needed]

In June 2014, Expedia started accepting bitcoins.[4]

Expedia was started by Microsoft and later spun off as a multi-billion dollar company because it was "no longer about software intensive technology" and they were "concerned that they would not do their best at this."[citation needed]

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