Expedition of Khalid ibn al-Walid (Banu Jadhimah)

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Expedition of Khalid ibn al-Walid (Nakhla)
Date January 630 AD, 8AH[1][2]
Location Mecca
Result
  • Successful operation, Banu Jadhimah tribe decide to convert to Islam
  • Khalid ibn Walid executes some prisoners due to Ancient enmity[3]
Commanders and leaders
Khalid ibn al-Walid Unknown
Strength
350 Unknown
Casualties and losses
0 Portion of the tribe executed[4]

Expedition of Khalid ibn al-Walid,[5] to Mecca, against Banu Jadhimah, took place in January 630 AD, 8AH, 9th month, of the Islamic Calendar.[6]

Khalid ibn al-Walid was sent to invite the Banu Jadhimah tribe to Islam. They accepted the invitation, but Khalid took all of them prisoners and executed a portion of the tribe anyway (before he was stopped), due to past enmity.[7][8][9]

Expedition against Banu Jadhimah[edit]

On his return from Nakhla expedition to destroy al-Uzza, Khalid bin Al-Waleed at the head of 350 horsemen of Helpers, Emigrants and Banu Saleem was despatched once again in the same year 8 A.H to the habitation of Bani Khuzaimah bedouins,[10] who were Sabaeans,[11][12]

His mission was to invite them to Islam. Many of the tribe members accepted the offer and converted to Islam. However Khalid ibn Walid had a past Ancient enmity with this tribe. According to the non-Muslim scholar Sir William Muir, what happened next, was one of the reasons that got Khalid ibn Walid the title of "The Sword of Allah".

Khalid ibn Walid tied them up and made them all prisoners and ordered their execution despite their conversion. A portion were put to death, before some other Muslims who were citizens of Medina came along, intervened to stop this.[13]

News of bloodshed reached the Muhammad. He was deeply grieved and raised his hands towards the heaven, uttering these words: "O Allâh! I am innocent of what Khalid has done," twice. He immediately sent ‘Ali to make every possible reparation to the tribes who had been wronged. After a careful inquiry, ‘Ali paid the blood-money to all those who suffered loss. The remaining portion was also distributed amongst the members of the tribe in order to alleviate their suffering. Khalid, had a row with ‘Abdur Rahman bin ‘Awf. Hearing this, the Prophet Muhammad got angry, and ordered Khalid to stop that altercation adding that his Companions (meaning ‘Abdur Rahman bin ‘Awf) were too high in rank to be involved in such arguments.[14][15]

Islamic sources[edit]

Islamic primary sources[edit]

An early written mention of this event is in the Sirat Rasul Allah (Life of Muhammad) by Ibn Ishaq, written just over 150 years after Muhammad's death. According to this work, Khalid was sent to the Banu Jadhimah tribe. Khalid persuaded them to disarm by acknowledging that they had become Muslims, and then killed some of them. When Muhammad heard of this, he declared to God that he was innocent of what Khalid had done, and sent 'Ali b. Abi Talilb to pay the survivors compensation. [16][17]

The event is also mentioned by the later Muslim Scholar Ibn Sa'd in his book "Kitab al-tabaqat al-kabir", as follows:

The Expedition is mentioned in the Sunni hadith collection Sahih al-Bukhari[19] as follows:

Muhammad Muhsin Khan, said in his book "The Translation of the Meanings Of Sahih Al-Bukhari", that Muhammad sent Khalid to fight the Banu Jadhima, and used this hadith as a reference[20]

Modern scholars[edit]

The Muslim scholar Muhammad Husayn Haykal (d. 1956), in his book "The Life of Muhammad" writes that Khalid intended to kill the people, he writes:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ List of Battles of Muhammad
  2. ^ Abu Khalil, Shawqi (1 March 2004). Atlas of the Prophet's biography: places, nations, landmarks. Dar-us-Salam. p. 226. ISBN 978-9960-897-71-4. 
  3. ^ The life of Mahomet and history of Islam, Volume 4, By Sir William Muir, Pg 135
  4. ^ The life of Mahomet and history of Islam, Volume 4, By Sir William Muir, Pg 135
  5. ^ Abu Khalil, Shawqi (1 March 2004). Atlas of the Prophet's biography: places, nations, landmarks. Dar-us-Salam. p. 226. ISBN 978-9960-897-71-4. 
  6. ^ List of Battles of Muhammad
  7. ^ The life of Mahomet and history of Islam, Volume 4, By Sir William Muir, Pg 135
  8. ^ The sealed nectar, By S.R. Al-Mubarakpuri, Pg256
  9. ^ "He sent Khalid bin Al-Waleed in Ramadan 8 A.H", Witness-Pioneer.com
  10. ^ The sealed nectar, By S.R. Al-Mubarakpuri, Pg256
  11. ^ "He sent Khalid bin Al-Waleed in Ramadan 8 A.H", Witness-Pioneer.com
  12. ^ The life of Mahomet and history of Islam, Volume 4, By Sir William Muir, Pg 135 See bottom, Notes section. Author writes: "they professed themselves sabeans"
  13. ^ The life of Mahomet and history of Islam, Volume 4, By Sir William Muir, Pg 135
  14. ^ The sealed nectar, By S.R. Al-Mubarakpuri, Pg256
  15. ^ "Khalid bin Al-Waleed at the head of 350 horsemen ", Witness-Pioneer.com
  16. ^ {Ibn Ishaq, Sirat Rasul Allah (Life of Muhammad), trans. Guillaume, Oxford 1955, pp. 561-562}
  17. ^ {al-Tabari, Victory of Islam, trans. Fishbein, Albany 1997, pp. 188 ff.}
  18. ^ Ibn Sa'd, Kitab al-tabaqat al-kabir, Volume 2, Pg 183
  19. ^ "He sent Khalid bin Al-Waleed in Ramadan 8 A.H", Witness-Pioneer.com
  20. ^ Muhsin Khan, The translation of the meanings of Ṣahih AL-Bukhari, Arabic-English, Volume 5, p. 440.
  21. ^ The Life of Muhammad By Muhammad Husayn Haykal, Published by: Islamic Book Trust, Pg 443