Extreme points of Malaysia

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Extreme points of Malaysia marked on the map of Malaysia

The extreme points of Malaysia include the coordinates that are further north, south, east or west than any other location in Malaysia; and the highest and the lowest altitudes in the country.

The latitude and longitude are expressed in decimal degree notation, in which a positive latitude value refers to the northern hemisphere, and a negative value refers to the southern hemisphere. Similarly, a positive longitude value refers to the eastern hemisphere, and a negative value refers to the western hemisphere. The coordinates used in this article are sourced from Google Earth, which makes use of the WGS84 geodetic reference system. Additionally, a negative altitude value refers to land below sea level.

Extreme points[edit]

Overall[edit]

Heading Location State Bordering entity Coordinates Ref
North
(disputed)
Swallow Reef in the Spratly Islands off the coast of Kota Kinabalu Sabah South China Sea 7°22′20″N 113°50′30″E / 7.37222°N 113.84167°E / 7.37222; 113.84167 (Swallow Reef (Northernmost - disputed))
North
(undisputed)
Pulau Guhuan Utara near Banggi Island Sabah Sulu Sea 7°22′46″N 117°14′05″E / 7.37944°N 117.23472°E / 7.37944; 117.23472 (Pulau Guhuan Utara (Northernmost - undisputed))
South Bukit Niat near Serian Sarawak Kalimantan, Indonesia 0°51′10″N 110°34′17″E / 0.85278°N 110.57139°E / 0.85278; 110.57139 (Bukit Niat (Southernmost))
East Near Kampong Look Sembuang in Lahad Datu Sabah Sulu Sea 5°14′27″N 119°16′00″E / 5.24083°N 119.26667°E / 5.24083; 119.26667 (Lahad Datu (Easternmost))
West Pulau Perak Kedah Strait of Malacca 6°5′26″N 98°55′48″E / 6.09056°N 98.93000°E / 6.09056; 98.93000 (Pulau Perak (Westernmost))

Peninsular Malaysia[edit]

The following are the extreme physical land mass points on the Malaysian peninsula inclusive of islands.

Heading Location State Bordering entity Coordinates Ref
North Bukit China near Wang Kelian Perlis Thailand 6°43′33″N 100°12′14″E / 6.72583°N 100.20389°E / 6.72583; 100.20389 (Wang Kelian)
South Tanjung Piai Johor Strait of Malacca 1°15′58″N 103°30′39″E / 1.26611°N 103.51083°E / 1.26611; 103.51083 (Tanjung Piai)
East Pulau Aur Johor South China Sea 2°26′57″N 104°31′30″E / 2.44917°N 104.52500°E / 2.44917; 104.52500 (Pulau Aur)
West Pulau Perak Kedah Strait of Malacca 6°5′26″N 98°55′48″E / 6.09056°N 98.93000°E / 6.09056; 98.93000 (Pulau Perak)

East Malaysia[edit]

The following are the extreme physical land mass points in East Malaysia inclusive of islands.

Heading Location State Bordering entity Coordinates Ref
North
(disputed)
Swallow Reef Sabah South China Sea 7°22′20″N 113°50′30″E / 7.37222°N 113.84167°E / 7.37222; 113.84167 (Swallow Reef (Northernmost - disputed))
North
(undisputed)
Pulau Guhuan Utara near Banggi Island Sabah Sulu Sea 7°22′46″N 117°14′05″E / 7.37944°N 117.23472°E / 7.37944; 117.23472 (Pulau Guhuan Utara (Northernmost - undisputed))
South Bukit Niat near Serian Sarawak Kalimantan, Indonesia 0°51′10″N 110°34′17″E / 0.85278°N 110.57139°E / 0.85278; 110.57139 (Bukit Niat (Southernmost))
East Near Kampong Look Sembuang in Lahad Datu Sabah Sulu Sea 5°14′27″N 119°16′00″E / 5.24083°N 119.26667°E / 5.24083; 119.26667 (Lahad Datu (Easternmost))
West Near Gunung Cermai in Kuching Sarawak Kalimantan, Indonesia 1°54′15″N 109°32′48″E / 1.90417°N 109.54667°E / 1.90417; 109.54667 (Gunung Cermai (Westernmost))

Extreme altitudes[edit]

The summit of Mount Kinabalu is the highest point in Malaysia.
Extremity Name Altitude State Coordinates Ref
Highest (Borneo) Mount Kinabalu 4,095 m (13,435 ft) Sabah 06°04′23″N 116°33′40″E / 6.07306°N 116.56111°E / 6.07306; 116.56111 (Mount Kinabalu (Highest)) [1]
Highest (Peninsular) Mount Tahan 2,187 m (7,175 ft) Pahang 4°37′56″N 102°14′03″E / 4.63222°N 102.23417°E / 4.63222; 102.23417 (Mount Tahan (Highest)) [2]
Lowest South China Sea 0 m (0 ft) 2°7′23″N 106°33′16″E / 2.12306°N 106.55444°E / 2.12306; 106.55444 (South China Sea (Lowest - natural)) [3]

Notes[edit]

^† Coordinates obtained from Google Earth. Google Earth makes use of the WGS84 geodetic reference system.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Phillipps, A. & F. Liew 2000. Globetrotter Visitor's Guide – Kinabalu Park. New Holland Publishers (UK) Ltd.
  2. ^ "Google Maps (Gunung Tahan)". Google. Retrieved 1 August 2009. 
  3. ^ "Malaysia - Land Statistics". WorldAtlas.com. Retrieved 31 July 2009. 

See also[edit]