F. C. D. Wyneken

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Friedrich Conrad Dietrich Wyneken (May 13, 1810 in Verden an der Aller – May 4, 1876 in San Francisco) was a missionary, pastor, and the second president of the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod. He was also the first president of Concordia Theological Seminary.

One hundred years after fellow Hanoverian Henry Muhlenberg brought together the pastors and congregations of colonial America, Wyneken gathered scattered German Protestants into confessional Lutheran congregations and forged them into a closely knit family of churches. It was Wyneken's influence which brought Wilhelm Sihler from Germany to America. Wyneken's missionary experience, method, and plan influenced American Lutheran missions for many years to come. He has been called the "thunder after the lightning."[1] He is commemorated on the Calendar of Saints of the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod on May 4.

Considered a "tireless" church worker by others, he confessed, rather, that he "suffered horribly from melancholy".[2]

Early life and family and education[edit]

The University of Halle in 1836

Wyneken was born to Pastor Heinrich Christoph Wyneken (1766-1815) and Anne Catherine Louise Wyneken nee Meyer (1773-1863) on May 13, 1810 in Verden an der Aller in the Kingdom of Westphalia. Some of the earlier Wynekens and their relatives were minor government officials in the Duchy of Bremen-Verden when it was under Swedish control.[3] The Wyneken family had an established Lutheran heritage long before Friedrich arrived in America. Heinrich Wyneken's father, grandfather, and one brother were pastors in Hanover. Two of Friedrich Wyneken's older brothers also became pastors. Significant numbers of more distant relatives and in-laws were also Lutheran clergy members, such as Superintendent Hans Heinrich Justus Phillip Ruperti, (1833-1899) who was Friedrich's nephew.[4]

Other Wyneken relatives had military careers in the Electorate of Hanover and others would serve in army of the Kingdom of Hanover. Friedrich Wyneken's maternal grandfather was a Rittmeister stationed in Verden. Wyneken's second cousin Christian Wilhelm August Johann Ernst Wyneken (1783- 1853) fought in the King's German Legion in Spain and at the Battle of Waterloo and later became a Lieutenant General in the Hanoverian Army and led a German contingent in the First Schleswig War.[5] Much later a third cousin, Hans Kannengiesser (1880-1970), would fight at Gallipoli and later become a generalleutnant.[6]

Wyneken was baptized on May 22, 1810, by his father at St. Andreas Church in Verden. Heinrich Wyneken died five years later, leaving eleven children and a widow behind. Friedrich attended the Gymnasium in Verden. At the age of seventeen he went to the University of Göttingen but soon enrolled at the University of Halle. Neither of these institutions had a reputation for the dogmatic Lutheran orthodoxy which Wyneken was later to embrace; rather they both promoted strong rationalistic viewpoints. At Halle Wyneken became a student of August Tholuck, a skilled linguist and a believer in the personal religious experience.[7]

After graduation Wyneken worked as a private instructor in Lesum (now a locality of Bremen) at the home of Consistorial Counsellor Georg von Henfstengel. During this time Wyneken came more influenced by the Erweckungsbewegung.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Christian Hochstetter. Die Geschichte der Evangelisch-lutherischen Missouri-Synode in Nord-Amerika, und ihrer Lehrkämpfe. Dresden: Heinrich J. Naumannm, 1885. 116.
  2. ^ I Trust When Dark My Road: A Lutheran View of Depression
  3. ^ http://wyneken-genealogy.blogspot.com/
  4. ^ http://wyneken-genealogy.blogspot.com/
  5. ^ http://wyneken-genealogy.blogspot.com/
  6. ^ http://wyneken-genealogy.blogspot.com/
  7. ^ Smith, Robert E. "Wyneken as Missionary" Let Christ be Christ. Daniel Harmelink, ed. Huntington Beach, CA: Tentatio Press, 1999. 321-340
  8. ^ Smith, Robert E. "Wyneken as Missionary" Let Christ be Christ. Daniel Harmelink, ed. Huntington Beach, CA: Tentatio Press, 1999. 321-340

External links[edit]

Books and articles about F.C.D. Wyneken[edit]

  • Dau, W.H.T. Ebenezer: Reviews of the Work of the Missouri Synod During Three Quarters of a Century. St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1922. pp. 52ff, chapter on "F.C.D. Wyneken".
  • Hageman, Gustav. Friedrich Konrad Dietrich Wyneken: Pioneer Missionary of the Nineteenth Century. Men and Missions Series. St. Louis: Concordia, 1926.
  • Lindemann, J.C.W. "F.C.D. Wyneken." in Amerikanischer Kalender für deutsche Lutheraner auf das jahr 1877 nach der Geburt unsers Herrn Jesu Christi. St. Louis: Der deutschen Ev. Luth. Synode von Missouri, Ohio u. a. Staaten, 1876.
  • Rehmer, Rudolph. "The Impact of Wyneken's Notruf." in Missionary to America: The History of Lutheran Outreach to Americans. Essays and Reports of the Lutheran Historical Conference 15. St. Louis: Lutheran Historical Conference, 1992.
  • Rehmer, Rudolph. "Report of the Executive Committee of the Missionary Society of the Synod of Pennsylvania, Containing Brother Wynecken's [sic] Report:" Concordia Historical Institute Quarterly 20 (1947)no. 3:124-25.
  • Saleska, Edward John. Friedrich Conrad Dieterich Wyneken 1810-1876. STM thesis. St. Louis: Concordia Seminary, 1946.
  • Smith, Robert E. "Wyneken as Missionary" Let Christ be Christ. Daniel Harmelink, ed. Huntington Beach, CA: Tentatio Press, 1999. 321-340. [1]
  • Threinen, Norman J. "Wyneken and 19th Century German Lutheranism: An Attempt to Mobilize Confessional Lutherans in Germany in Behalf of Lutherans in North America." in Missionary to America: The History of Lutheran Outreach to Americans. Essays and Reports of the Lutheran Historical Conference 15. St. Louis:Lutheran Historical Conference, 1992.
  • Threinen, Norman J. "F.C.D. Wyneken: Motivator for the Mission" Concordia Theological Quarterly 60 (1996) Nos. 1-2.
Religious titles
Preceded by
C. F. W. Walther
President
Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod

1850–1864
Succeeded by
C. F. W. Walther