FA Women's Premier League National Division

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FA Women's Premier League National Division
FAWPL Logo.png
Country England
Confederation UEFA
Founded 1991
Divisions 1
Number of teams 10
Levels on pyramid 2
Relegation to Northern Division
Southern Division
Domestic cup(s) FA Women's Cup
FA Women's Premier League Cup
Current champions Sunderland WFC
(2011–12)
Most championships Arsenal
(12 times)
Website League home page

The FA Women's Premier League National Division was a football division in England. From 1991 until the introduction of the summer competition FA Women's Super League the National Division functioned as the top league in England. During its final two seasons it operated as the second level of the English women's football league pyramid. The Division was scrapped at the end of the 2012/13 season, prior to the launch of the Women's Super League 2. The league was played on a home and away basis, with each team playing each other twice, and points being awarded in the standard football format.

Below the National Division were simultaneously the Northern and Southern divisions and the remainder of the women's football pyramid. These divisions remain after the cancellation of the National Division It was the women's football counterpart to the Premier League, although the women's league was not fully professional. The terms Women's Premiership and Ladies' Premiership thus generally referred to the National Division alone.

Premiership teams also competed in the FA Women's Cup and the Premier League Cup, and the Premiership winner competed against the FA Cup winner for the FA Women's Community Shield. Until 2010 Premiership winners and runners-up also competed in the UEFA Women's Champions League as well.

For the 2006–07 season, the number of competing teams was increased from 10 to 12, with the promotion of the Northern (Blackburn Rovers) and Southern (Cardiff City) champions and no relegations despite test matches being played.

For the 2010–2011 season, the league reduced to eight clubs from twelve. Six clubs left to form the FA Women's Super League, as did the Northern Division champions and runners-up, Liverpool and OOH Lincoln. The six remaining National Division clubs and the Southern Division top two, Barnet and Reading, thus comprised the second-level National Division.[1] The 2012-13 season was the final season for the division.

National Division clubs, 2012–13[edit]

Club Finishing position 2011–12
Aston Villa 3rd
Barnet 4th
Cardiff City 8th
Charlton Athletic 5th
Coventry City 6th
Leeds United 2nd
Manchester City 1st in Northern Division
Portsmouth 1st in Southern Division
Sunderland 1st
Watford 7th

History[edit]

Year by year[edit]

Year Winner Runner Up Third Place Relegated
2011–12 Sunderland A.F.C. Women Leeds United L.F.C. Aston Villa L.F.C. Nottingham Forest L.F.C., Reading Women
2010–11 Sunderland A.F.C. Women Nottingham Forest L.F.C. Reading Women Blackburn Rovers L.F.C., Millwall Lionesses L.F.C.
2009–10 Arsenal L.F.C. Everton L.F.C. Chelsea L.F.C. None (restructure due to FA WSL)
2008–09 Arsenal L.F.C. Everton L.F.C. Chelsea L.F.C. Liverpool L.F.C., Fulham L.F.C.
2007–08 Arsenal L.F.C. Everton L.F.C. Leeds United L.F.C. Cardiff City L.F.C., Charlton Athletic L.F.C.
2006–07 Arsenal L.F.C. Everton L.F.C. Charlton Athletic L.F.C. Sunderland A.F.C. Women, Fulham L.F.C.
2005–06 Arsenal L.F.C. Everton L.F.C. Charlton Athletic L.F.C. None (expansion to 12 clubs)
2004–05 Arsenal L.F.C. Charlton Athletic L.F.C. Everton L.F.C. Liverpool L.F.C., Bristol City W.F.C.
2003–04 Arsenal L.F.C. Charlton Athletic L.F.C. Fulham L.F.C. Aston Villa L.F.C., Tranmere Rovers L.F.C.
2002–03 Fulham L.F.C. Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Arsenal L.F.C. Southampton Saints W.F.C., Brighton & Hove Albion W.F.C.
2001–02 Arsenal L.F.C. Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Charlton Athletic L.F.C. Barry Town W.F.C., Sunderland A.F.C. Women
2000–01 Arsenal L.F.C. Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Charlton Athletic L.F.C. Millwall Lionesses L.F.C., Liverpool L.F.C.
1999–2000 Croydon L.F.C. Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Arsenal L.F.C. Aston Villa L.F.C., Reading Royals L.F.C.
1998–99 Croydon L.F.C. Arsenal L.F.C. Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Bradford City W.F.C., Ilkeston Town F.C. Ladies
1997–98 Everton L.F.C. Arsenal L.F.C. Barnet F.C. Ladies, Barry Town W.F.C.
1996–97 Arsenal L.F.C. Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Croydon L.F.C. Southampton Saints L.F.C., Ilkeston Town F.C. Ladies
1995–96 Croydon L.F.C. Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Arsenal L.F.C. Villa Aztecs L.F.C., Wolverhampton Wanderers L.F.C.
1994–95 Arsenal L.F.C. Liverpool L.F.C. Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Red Star Southampton L.F.C.
1993–94 Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Arsenal L.F.C. Knowsley United L.F.C. Ipswich Town L.F.C., Wimbledon L.F.C.
1992–93 Arsenal L.F.C. Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Knowsley United L.F.C. Maidstone Tigresses L.F.C., Bronte L.F.C.
1991–92 Doncaster Belles L.F.C. Red Star Southampton L.F.C. Wimbledon L.F.C. None (expansion to 10 clubs)

* Bold designates teams that won a double with the FA Cup.
Arsenal L.F.C. completed a treble with the UEFA Women's Cup in 2007.

Performance by club[edit]

Club Winners Runners-up Winning Years
Arsenal
12
3
1992–93, 1994–95, 1996–97, 2000–01, 2001–02, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10
Charlton Athletic (inc. Croydon)
3
2
1995–96, 1998–99, 1999–2000
Doncaster Rovers Belles
2
7
1991–92, 1993–94
Sunderland
2
0
2010-11, 2011-12
Everton
1
5
1997–98
Fulham
1
0
2002–03
Liverpool
0
1
1994-95
Nottingham Forest
0
1
2010-11
Leeds United
0
1
2011-12

See also[edit]

  1. ^ "Premier League Changes". She Kicks. 17 June 2010. Retrieved 17 June 2010. 

External links[edit]