FBI Most Wanted Terrorists

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Banner used by the FBI since inception on October 10, 2001 as the main title for the web site pages of both the group of wanted terrorists, and also on the wanted poster of each terrorist fugitive. The three overlapping seals on the left are the seal of the U.S. Department of State (similar to the Great Seal of the United States), the seal of the U.S. Department of Justice, and the seal of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation's Most Wanted Terrorists is a list of persons who have been indicted (formally accused) by sitting Federal grand juries in the United States district courts, for alleged crimes of terrorism. The initial list was formed in late 2001 in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks and contained the names of 22 persons alleged to be terrorists by U.S. authorities. It was the second major "wanted" list following the FBI's Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list. It now serves as a companion to that earlier list, which in years past, had listed several major terrorist fugitives.

At least two persons on the list have been tried and convicted of crimes by a court of law in the United States. JoAnne Byron was convicted of murder in 1977, and Ahmed Ghailani of conspiracy in 2010.

List of initial 22 persons alleged to be terrorist fugitives[edit]

In response to the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, former President Bush released to the public this initial list on October 10, 2001 of the FBI's top 22 Most Wanted Terrorists. The 22 persons chosen by the FBI to be profiled on the list had all been earlier indicted for acts of terrorism between the years 1985 and 1998. None of the 22 had been captured by American or other authorities as of October 2001. Of the 22, only Osama bin Laden was by then already listed on the FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list.

On the fugitive group wanted poster, The FBI did not list the persons in any particular stated order, except perhaps for the consistent placing of bin Laden in the number one position of the top row. However, the 22 can easily fit into distinct categories of over the two decades, based on the terrorist attacks in which they were, according to American authorities, involved. For organization and ease of reference here, the relevant major terrorist attacks are listed by date below, with a brief summary for each, identifying the terror cells most directly responsible for the attack. The 22 on the list are then grouped beneath the attack for which each person was first accused of involvement.[1]

To date, 10 of the original 22 fugitives are still at large.

Photo Name Alleged terrorist activity Date of activity Status
Imad Mughniyah TWA Flight 847 June 14, 1985 Dead
Assassinated in a car bombing on February 12, 2008 in Damascus.[2]
Hassan Izz-Al-Din TWA Flight 847 June 14, 1985 At large
Thought to be living in Lebanon.[3]
Ali Atwa
Ali Atwa TWA Flight 847 June 14, 1985 At large
Thought to be living in Lebanon.[4]
Abdul Rahman Yasin in 2002
Abdul Rahman Yasin 1993 World Trade Center bombing February 26, 1993 At large
Accused of constructing bombs in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. Yasin was allegedly a prisoner of Saddam Hussein in 2002, but has since gone missing from Iraq. He was not located during the 2003 invasion of Iraq.
Khalid Shaikh Mohammed
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed Bojinka plot 1994–1995 Captured
Captured in Pakistan on March 1, 2003.
Ahmed Ibrahim Al-Mughassil Khobar Towers bombing June 25, 1996 At large
Ali Saed Bin Ali El-Hoorie Khobar Towers bombing June 25, 1996 At large
Ibrahim Salih Mohammed Al-Yacoub Khobar Towers bombing June 25, 1996 At large
Abdelkarim Hussein Mohamed Al-Nasser Khobar Towers bombing June 25, 1996 At large
Mohammed Atef
Mohammed Atef 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Dead
Killed in Afghanistan on November 14, 2001 by a Predator missile attack on his home outside of Kabul.
Osama bin Laden
Osama bin Laden 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Dead
Killed by U.S. Navy Seals in a mansion in Abbottabad, Pakistan; announced dead May 2, 2011.[5][6] He was wanted for his admitted responsibility in the September 11, 2001 attacks.[7] He was placed on the Most Wanted Terrorists list for his involvement in the bombings of the U.S. embassies in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.[1]
Ayman al-Zawahiri 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 At large
Al-Qaeda's No.1. Ayman al-Zawahiri is under indictment in the United States for his suspected role in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya. The Rewards for Justice Program of the U.S. Department of State is offering a reward of up to US$25 million for information about his location and capture.[8]
Fazul Abdullah Mohammed 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Dead
Reports surfaced on June 11, 2011 that he was killed in Somalia.[9] Kenyan police stated, through DNA testing, that they were certain he was killed by Somalian forces on June 8.[9] Officially listed as deceased on the FBI website by June 12.[8]
Mustafa Mohamed Fadhil
Mustafa Mohamed Fadhil 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Dead
Killed in Afghanistan.[10][11][12] He was removed from the list in May 2005.
Fahid Mohammed Ally Msalam
Fahid Mohammed Ally Msalam 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Dead
Killed January 1, 2009, in an unmanned aerial strike in Pakistan along with Sheikh Ahmed Salim Swedan.[13]
Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani
Ahmed Ghailani 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Captured
Captured in Pakistan on July 25, 2004, and later held in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Ghailani was tried by a civilian court in New York in 2010 and convicted of conspiring to bomb the American embassies in Tanzania and Kenya. The jury however acquitted him of all other 284 charges, including attempted murder.[14]
Sheikh Ahmed Salim Swedan 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Dead
Killed January 1, 2009, in an unmanned aerial strike in Pakistan along with Fahid Mohammed Ali Musallam.[13]
Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah
Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 At large
Believed to be under house arrest in Iran.[15]
Anas al-Liby 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Captured
Al-Liby was captured in Tripoli, Libya on October 5, 2013 by Delta Force commandos.[16]
Saif al-Adel
Saif al-Adel 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 At large
Believed to be under house arrest in Iran.[15]
Ahmed Mohammed Hamed Ali
Ahmed Mohammed Hamed Ali 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Dead
Reported as killed in a drone strike in 2010 in Pakistan by the National Counterterrorism Center.[17][18] He was removed from the list in 2012.
Mushin Musa Matwalli Atwah
Mushin Musa Matwalli Atwah 1998 United States embassy bombings August 7, 1998 Dead
Killed April 12, 2006 along with 6 other alleged militants by Pakistani forces in a helicopter gunship raid on the village of Naghar Kalai near the Afghan border. Villagers reported that armed men removed the bodies.[19] Atwah's death was confirmed by US officials on October 24, 2006, following DNA testing, and he was removed from the list.[20]

FBI Seeking Information – War on Terrorism list[edit]

Whereas the Most Wanted Terrorists list is reserved for terrorist fugitives who have been indicted by federal grand juries, the FBI recognized a further need to achieve a much quicker response time in order to prevent any future attacks which may be in the current planning stages. To enlist the public's help in this effort, the FBI sought a way to deliver the early known suspected terror attack information, often very limited, out to the public as quickly as possible. So, on January 17, 2002, the third major FBI wanted list was first released, which has now become known as the FBI Seeking Information – War on Terrorism list.

As the name of this list implies, the FBI's intent is to acquire any critical information from the public, as soon as possible, about the suspected terrorists, who may be in the planning stages of terror attacks against United States nationals at home and abroad. The first such list profiled five persons about whom little was known, but who were suspected of plotting terrorist attacks in martyrdom operations. The main evidence against the five was five videos they had produced, found in the rubble of Mohammed Atef's destroyed home outside Kabul, Afghanistan.

Additions to the list[edit]

By 2006, more than four years had passed since the FBI had listed the original 22 alleged terrorists on the Most Wanted Terrorist list. Of those 22, by then four had been qualified for removal from the list, due to death or capture. Also by then, the FBI determined that new persons qualified to be listed as Most Wanted Terrorists. Some of these persons were indicted for attacks and plots that had taken place since the original list had been compiled. The original indictments had been for incidents only through 1998. Since then, the U.S. had become victim to at least two major terror attacks, which would generate some of the new indictments for the Most Wanted Terrorists, notably:

In addition, after the original 2001 list had been compiled and released to the public, the U.S. had foiled and issued indictments for numerous other plots, involving some new listed Most Wanted Terrorists. Those notable other plots involved:[21]

In February 2006, the FBI completed two groups of additions to the Most Wanted Terrorists list, the first such additions in over four years. On February 24, 2006, the day after adding two name to the list, the FBI added an additional six fugitive terrorists, for various plots and attacks. One of the entries was for an indictment dating back to the June 14, 1985, hijacking of TWA flight 847 by Hezbollah (see above).

Additionally, the FBI also added to the Seeking Information – War on Terrorism list an additional three persons, most notably, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the notorious leader of Al-Qaeda in Iraq.[22] This marked the first time that al-Zarqawi had appeared on any of the three major FBI wanted lists. On June 8, 2006, ABC News reported that Abu Musab al-Zarqawi was confirmed to have been killed in Baghdad in a bombing raid by a United States task force. His death was confirmed by multiple sources in Iraq, including the United States government.

Photo Name Alleged terrorist activity Date of Activity Date Added to List Status
Jamel Ahmed Mohammed Ali Al-Badawi
Jamal Ahmad Mohammad Al Badawi USS Cole bombing October 12, 2000 February 23, 2006 At large
Rewards for Justice offering $5 million for information leading to his capture or conviction.[8]
Jaber A. Elbaneh
Jaber A. Elbaneh Buffalo Six Sometime in 2002 February 23, 2006 At large
Surrendered to Yemeni authorities on May 20, 2007.[23] However, he was not taken into US custody and is still listed as wanted as of September 5, 2011.
Mohammed Ali Hammadi
Mohammed Ali Hamadei TWA Flight 847 June 14, 1985 February 24, 2006 At large
Rewards for Justice offering $5 million for information leading to his capture or conviction.[8] Thought to be in Lebanon.[24]
Ramadan Abdullah Mohammad Shallah Palestinian Islamic Jihad, on RICO Since 1995 February 24, 2006 At large
Abd Al Aziz Awda Palestinian Islamic Jihad, on RICO Since 1995 February 24, 2006 At large
Khadafi Abubakar Janjalani
Khadafi Abubakar Janjalani Abu Sayyaf kidnaps & murders in the Philippines Early 1990s - 2000s (decade) February 24, 2006 Dead
Died of gunshot wounds on September 4, 2006. Philippine marines found the remains of his body on December 27, 2006. Death was confirmed by DNA testing on January 20, 2007[25] Listed as deceased as of January 22, 2007. Removed from list as of February 21.
Jainal Antel Sali Abu Sayyaf kidnaps & murders in the Philippines Early 1990s - 2000s (decade) February 24, 2006 Dead
Killed by Philippines special forces on January 16, 2007.
Isnilon Totoni Hapilon
Isnilon Totoni Hapilon Abu Sayyaf kidnaps & murders in the Philippines Early 1990s - 2000s (decade) February 24, 2006 At large
Adam Yahiye Gadahn
Adam Yahiye Gadahn Treason 2003–Present October 11, 2006 At large
Gadahn was removed by the FBI from the Seeking Information - War on Terrorism list on October 11, 2006, and placed instead on the FBI Most Wanted Terrorists list.[26] Also, on October 11, 2006, Gadahn was indicted on a treason charge by a federal grand jury in Santa Ana, California making him the first American charged with treason since 1952.[27] Rewards for Justice offering $1 million for information leading to his capture.[8]
Daniel Andreas San Diego Chiron and Shaklee bombings August 28, 2003
September 26, 2003
April 11, 2009 At large
San Diego was added to the FBI Most Wanted Terrorists list in connection with two Animal Liberation Brigade bombings in Northern California in 2003. He is the second United States citizen, and the first domestic terrorist, to appear on the list.[28] The FBI is offering $250,000.00 for information leading to his arrest.[8]
Fahd al-Quso USS Cole bombing October 12, 2000 November 2, 2009 Dead
Sought for his role in the October 2000 bombing of the USS Cole in Yemen, in which 17 American sailors were killed.[29] Rewards for Justice offered $5 million for information leading to his capture or conviction [8] He was killed in a drone strike in Yemen on May 6, 2012.
Husayn Muhammed al-Umari Pan Am Flight 830 Bombing August 11, 1982 November 2, 2009 At large
Also known as Abu Ibrahim, is wanted in connection with the 1982 bombing of Pan Am Flight 830.[29][30]
Wadoud Muhammad Hafiz Al-Turki Pan Am Flight 73 September 5, 1986 December 3, 2009 At large
Wanted for his role in the hijacking of Pan American World Airways Flight 73.[31]
Jamal Saeed Abdul Rahim Pan Am Flight 73 September 5, 1986 December 3, 2009 At large[32]
Wanted for his role in the hijacking of Pan American World Airways Flight 73.[31]
Muhammad Abdullah Khalil Hussain Ar-Rahayyal Pan Am Flight 73 September 5, 1986 December 3, 2009 At large
Wanted for his role in the hijacking of Pan American World Airways Flight 73.[31]
Muhammad Ahmed Al-Munawar Pan Am Flight 73 September 5, 1986 December 3, 2009 At large
Wanted for his role in the hijacking of Pan American World Airways Flight 73.[31]
Adnan G. El Shukrijumah
Adnan Gulshair el Shukrijumah New York City Subway suicide bomb planning September 2009 July 8, 2010 At large
Wanted for his alleged role in the plot against New York City's subway system, uncovered in September 2009.[33]
Assata Shakur
Assata Shakur (née JoAnne Deborah Byron, married name Joanna Chesimard) Murder of Trooper Werner Foerster on May 2, 1973 May 2, 1973 May 2, 2013 At large
Former Black Liberation Army member openly living in Cuba after she escaped from a New Jersey prison in 1979. Two million dollar reward offered.[34]

Rewards[edit]

Since 1984, the United States government has also used the Rewards for Justice Program, which pays monetary rewards of up to $5 million, or now, in some cases more, upon special authorization by the United States Secretary of State, to individuals who provide information which substantially leads to countering of terrorist attacks against United States persons. More than $100 million had been paid to over 60 people through this program.[35]

The Rewards for Justice Program was established by the 1984 Act to Combat International Terrorism, Public Law 98-533, and is administered by the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, within the U.S. Department of State.[35]

See also[edit]

Captured al-Qaeda terrorists[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Most wanted terrorists list released". CNN. October 1, 2001. Retrieved July 18, 2008. 
  2. ^ Matthew Kalman and Bill Hutchinson (February 14, 2008). "Hezbollah terror thug behind 1983 Lebanon bombing killed by car bomb". Daily News. Retrieved December 3, 2008. 
  3. ^ "Fbi — Hasan Izz-Al-Din". Fbi.gov. Retrieved December 30, 2012. 
  4. ^ "FBI - Ali Atwa". FBI.gov. Retrieved May 2, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Operation was designed to kill bin Laden, source says". CNN.com. May 2, 2011. Retrieved May 2, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Osama Bin Laden Killed By Navy SEALs in Firefight". ABC.com. May 2, 2011. Retrieved May 7, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Bin Laden claims responsibility for 9/11". CBC News. October 29, 2004. Retrieved June 24, 2009. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g "Most Wanted Terrorists". FBI.gov. Retrieved May 25, 2011. 
  9. ^ a b "AFP: Al-Qaeda's E. Africa chief believed dead: US official". Google. June 11, 2011. Retrieved December 30, 2012. 
  10. ^ http://www.makingsenseofjihad.com/2009/10/a-study-of-martyrs-in-a-time-of-alienation-xvii.html
  11. ^ http://americanjihadists.com/2008-12-Ghailani-Interrogation-all.pdf
  12. ^ "Recommendation for Continued Detention Under DoD Control". Department of Defense. Retrieved January 25, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b "Two Top Al Qaeda Terrorists Killed in Missile Attack". FOX News. January 8, 2009. Retrieved January 9, 2009. 
  14. ^ Charlie Savage (November 18, 2010). "Terror Verdict Tests Obama’s Strategy on Civilian Trials". The New York Times. Retrieved May 14, 2013. 
  15. ^ a b http://kronosadvisory.com/Kronos_US_v_Sulaiman_Abu_Ghayth_Statement.1.pdf
  16. ^ "Man Sought In ’98 Attacks On Embassies Is Seized". NY Times. Retrieved October 5, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Report: Drone strikes killing few leaders". United Press International, Inc. February 21, 2011. Retrieved February 28, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Increased U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan killing few high-value militants". The Washington Post. February 20, 2011. Retrieved December 30, 2012. 
  19. ^ Pakistan: Al-Qaeda militant killed near border, Associated Press, USA April 13, 2006
  20. ^ One of FBI's 'Most Wanted Terrorists' confirmed dead, CNN, October 24, 2006
  21. ^ "Recent Escapees From Yemen Prison Added to Most Wanted Terrorists and Seeking Information - War on Terrorism Lists". Federal Bureau of Investigation. February 23, 2006. Archived from the original on April 11, 2010. Retrieved August 14, 2012. 
  22. ^ "FBI Updates Most Wanted Terrorists and Seeking Information – War on Terrorism Lists". FBI.gov. February 24, 2010. Archived from the original on August 30, 2010. Retrieved January 3, 2012. 
  23. ^ "U.S. Fugitive Born in Yemen Surrenders in Terror Case". The New York Times. May 25, 2007. Retrieved January 9, 2009. 
  24. ^ http://www.fbi.gov/wanted/wanted_terrorists/mohammed-ali-hamadei
  25. ^ ABC News: ABC News[dead link]
  26. ^ American Al-Qaeda Member Gadahn Charged With Treason by U.S., Bloomberg, By Robert Schmidt, October 11, 2006
  27. ^ American Al Qaeda Member to Be Indicted for Treason, Fox News, October 12, 2006
  28. ^ "Daniel Andreas San Diego Added to FBI’s ‘Most Wanted Terrorists’ List". BackgroundNow.com. April 21, 2009. Retrieved April 28, 2009. [dead link]
  29. ^ a b Two Names Added to List, FBI.gov, November 24, 2009, retrieved May 20, 2010 
  30. ^ Rewards for Justice - Husayn Muhammed al-Umari Reward Offer, U.S. State Department, November 24, 2009, retrieved May 20, 2010 
  31. ^ a b c d Rewards for Justice - Reward Offer for Pan Am Flight 73 Hijackers, U.S. State Department, December 3, 2009, retrieved May 20, 2010 
  32. ^ http://www.fbi.gov/wanted/wanted_terrorists/jamal-saeed-abdul-rahim/view
  33. ^ "Adnan G. el Shukrijumah". FBI.gov. Retrieved February 28, 2011. 
  34. ^ Jones, David (May 2, 2013). "New Jersey trooper's killer is first woman on FBI most wanted terror list". Reuters. Retrieved May 2, 2013. 
  35. ^ a b "Rewards for Justice: Program Overview". Rewards for Justice. Retrieved May 25, 2011. 

External links[edit]