FC Lokomotiv Moscow

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"Lokomotiv Moscow" redirects here. For the rugby league football club, see RC Lokomotiv Moscow.
Lokomotiv Moscow
Lokomotivmoscow.png
Full name Футбо́льный клуб "Локомоти́в" Москва́
(Football Club Lokomotiv Moscow)
Nickname(s) Loko
Parovozy (Steam Locomotives)
Krasno-zelyonyye (Red-Greens)
Zheleznodorozhniki (Railroaders)
Founded 12 August 1923; 91 years ago (1923-08-12)
Ground Lokomotiv Stadium, Moscow
Ground Capacity 28,800
Chairman Russia Olga Smorodskaya
Head Coach Montenegro Miodrag Božović
League Russian Premier League
2013–14 Russian Premier League, 3rd
Website Club home page
Current season

FC Lokomotiv Moscow (FC Lokomotiv Moskva, Russian: Футбо́льный клуб "Локомоти́в" Москва́[1] [fʊdˈbolʲnɨj klup ləkəmɐˈtʲif mɐˈskva], English: Locomotive) is a Russian football club based in Moscow. Lokomotiv Moscow won the Russian Premier League two times and the Russian Cup five times.

Lokomotiv won the Russian Premier League in 2002 (ending Spartak Moscow domination) and in 2004, the USSR Cup in 1936 and 1957, and the Russian Cup in 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001 and 2007. The club was the league runner-up in 1959, 1995, 1999, 2000 and 2001, and finished third in 1994, 1998, 2005, 2006 and 2014. Lokomotiv was the Russian Super Cup holder in 2003 and 2005.

History[edit]

Early Years[edit]

Lokomotiv was originally founded as Kazanka (Moskovskaya-Kazanskaya Zh.D) in 1922. In 1924, the club united the strongest football players of several roads of the Moscow railway junction as KOR (Club of the October Revolution). In 1931, the club was again renamed to Kazanka (Moskovskaya-Kazanskaya Zh.D) and in 1936, it was eventually renamed to as it is known today, Lokomotiv. During the Communist rule, Lokomotiv Moscow club was a part of the Lokomotiv Voluntary Sports Society and was owned by the Soviet Ministry of Transportation through the Russian Railways.

Soviet era[edit]

Lokomotiv Moscow in final 1936

When the Lokomotiv Voluntary Sports Society was created in 1936, its football team featured the best players of Kazanka, and a number of strong Soviet footballers of that time such as Valentin Granatkin, Nikolay llyin, Alexey Sokolov, Pyotr Terenkov, Mikhail Zhukov, llya Gvozdkov and Ivan Andreev. Lokomotiv debuted in the first ever Soviet football club championship with a game against Dynamo Leningrad on 22 May 1936. In the first two seasonal championships (spring and autumn), Lokomotiv finished fifth and fourth respectively. The first Lokomotiv success arrived shortly as in 1936, the railwaymen rose up to the occasion to beat Dynamo Tbilisi by 2 goals to nil in the Soviet Cup Final, and thus proclaim the first ever Soviet Cup.

Lokomotiv Moscow in final 1957

The following years were rather successful as Lokomotiv were consistent in the national championships. However, performances after World War II suffered and actually in the space of five year Lokomotiv were relegated to the Soviet First League twice. In 1951, Lokomotiv came second and eventually won the promotion to the Soviet Top League. This kicked off the second Lokomotiv's resurgence and till the beginning of the sixties, the Lokomotiv competed for the highest trophies. Actually in 1957, Lokomotiv won the cup for the second time, and two years later, Lokomotiv won the silver medals of the Soviet League. Eventually the second place was the highest position ever obtained by Lokomotiv in Soviet era.

Another important trademark for Lokomotiv was the authorization of playing friendly matches against foreign opposition. This because up to the late fifties, international sports contacts of the Soviet teams were extremely rare. However, since in 1955 Lokomotiv became an original football ambassador of the Soviet Union abroad, Lokomotiv were allowed to play friendly matches in various parts of the world such as Europe, Asia, Africa and even North America. This resulted to be a great era for Lokomotiv and the squad included some of the finest Russian footballers of all time such as Vladimir Maslachenko, Gennady Zabelin, Eugeny Rogov, Valentin Bubukin, Victor Sokolov, Victor Voroshilov, Igor Zajtsev, Zaur Kaloyev, Yuri Kovalyov and Vitaly Artemyev. When Lokomotiv’s strongest players abandoned the club, Lokomotiv fell again from grace. A swing between the first and second division followed. This lasted until the end of the 80s.

Post-Soviet era[edit]

In the beginning of the 1990s, Lokomotiv was considered the "weakest link" among top Moscow clubs. It lacked both results on the pitch and fans' support in the stands. However, head coach Yuri Semin and president Valeri Filatov were able to put the club's progress on a right track and thus installing Lokomotiv as the fifth wheel of the Moscow cart. Historically Lokomotiv wasn't considered to be a big club as Spartak, CSKA, Dynamo and Torpedo. With the former Soviet republics and their clubs gone, Lokomotiv took the opportunity to shine.

Solid performances in domestic league and several memorable campaigns in European Cups made Lokomotiv a superclub by Russian scales and brought back fans and supporters back to the stands. In 2002, a new stadium resembling a traditional, compact English one was built. The arena, still considered as being one of the most, if not the best and comfortable in Eastern Europe gave a huge boost to a club's fan growth rate. Eventually in 2009, the average attendance at the stadium was the second highest in Moscow.

In 2002 a "golden match" was needed to decide who will be the champion, as Lokomotiv Moscow and PFC CSKA Moscow both finished with the same amount of points after Gameweek 30. The game was played at Dynamo in front of a sold-out crowd. Lokomotiv took an early lead thanks a low drive from captain Dmitry Loskov, and eventually the goal turned out to be enough for Lokomotiv to claim the first title in the club's history.

Two years later, Lokomotiv Moscow won again the Russian Premier League by a single point over city rivals CSKA Moscow. Lokomotiv won the championship by defeating Shinnik Yaroslavl 2–0 in Yaroslavl, a week after CSKA slipped up against city rivals Dynamo Moscow at home.

In 2005 their head coach for many years, Yuri Semin, left them to coach the Russian national team and was replaced by Vladimir Eshtrekov. During that same year, although leading the league for most of the year, Lokomotiv, under Estrekhov stumbled in the last games and eventually let CSKA to overtake them and claim the title. Ultimately, with Lokomotiv finishing 3rd. Estrekhov was sacked and Slavoljub Muslin was called in to replace him. This was Loko's first foreign manager in the club's history. After a poor start, Lokomotiv recovered and finished third. Despite a respectable performance, Muslin was sacked. Anatoly Byshovets took the helm and Yury Semin returned to Lokomotiv as a president. This brought little success to Lokomotiv and the season was rather a disappointing one as Lokomotiv finished in the 7th place. The only bright point was the winning of the Cup. These poor performances prompted the Board of Directors to sack both coach Anatoly Byshovets and president Semin. Subsequently Rinat Bilyaletdinov acted as a caretaker coach. This lasted until 6 December 2006 as Lokomotiv brought Rashid Rakhimov from Amkar on a three year contract. However, this resulted to be yet another false move from the board as Lokomotiv were only capable of finishing 7th in 2008 and starting poorly the 2009 season. Unsurprisingly on 28 April 2009, Lokomotiv fired Rakhimov. Long-time serving player Vladimir Maminov was installed as a caretaker manager. A month later, Semin was brought back to the club to take charge. This appointment delivered immediate success to Lokomotiv as after a really poor start, Lokomotiv recovered and finished the season on a high, claiming fourth place in the process.

Before the 2011/12 league season, Semin left the club and was replaced by former PFC Spartak Nalchik manager, Yuri Krasnozhan. On 4 June 2011, rumours spread that Lokomotiv chairman Olga Smorodskaya suspected Krasnozhan of throwing away the home league game against FC Anzhi Makhachkala, played on 27 May and finished 1–2, and decided to fire him on the grounds of the suspicion.[1][2][3] Lokomotiv was 5th in the table at that moment, just one point away from first-placed CSKA. On 6 July, after Lokomotiv Committee of Directors meeting, Krasnozhan's contract was officially terminated on the basis of "negligence in his job".[2][3][4][5] Russian Football Union subsequently refused to investigate the case.[6] Assistant manager Maminov once again took over on a caretaker basis until a replacement was found. This lasted about three weeks as José Couceiro became the new manager. However, Couceiro only lasted a year in the role as his contract was not renewed by the club. As Croatia head coach Slaven Bilić announced he would step down after Euro 2012, Loko acted quickly to sign him to a three year contract. However, Bilić's first season at the helm brought another disappointment, as Loko finished 9th claiming the lowest place in all history of its participation in Russian championships. So, before 2013-14 season club sacked Bilić and agreed contract with new head coach Leonid Kuchuk.[7]

Performances in Europe[edit]

Lokomotiv reached the Cup Winners' Cup semi-final twice (in 1997/98 and 1998/99). The club also played in the 2nd group stage of the Champions league in 2002/03 season and lost by the away goal in the Champions League last 16 tie against AS Monaco in 2004. These were the best achievements of the club in the European cups so far.

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

[8] Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 Brazil GK Guilherme (captain)
3 Russia MF Alan Kasaev
4 Portugal MF Manuel Fernandes
5 Serbia DF Nemanja Pejčinović
7 Brazil MF Maicon
8 Russia MF Aleksandr Sheshukov
9 Russia FW Roman Pavlyuchenko
11 Morocco MF Mbark Boussoufa
14 Croatia DF Vedran Ćorluka
15 Russia DF Arseniy Logashov
16 Russia GK Ilya Lantratov
17 Ukraine DF Taras Mykhalyk
19 Russia MF Aleksandr Samedov
21 Senegal MF Baye Oumar Niasse
No. Position Player
22 Russia DF Maksim Belyayev
23 Russia MF Dmitri Tarasov (vice-captain)
26 Belarus MF Yan Tigorev
28 Slovakia DF Ján Ďurica
29 Uzbekistan DF Vitaliy Denisov
33 Senegal FW Dame N'Doye
41 Russia GK Miroslav Lobantsev
49 Russia DF Roman Shishkin (vice-captain)
55 Russia DF Renat Yanbayev
59 Russia MF Aleksei Miranchuk
60 Russia MF Anton Miranchuk
77 Russia MF Sergei Tkachev
81 Russia GK Ilya Abayev

Youth squad[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
30 Russia FW Arshak Koryan
31 Russia DF Aleksandr Dovbnya
32 Russia FW Rifat Zhemaletdinov
35 Russia GK Filipp Kharin
36 Russia MF Dmitri Barinov
37 Russia FW Andrea Chukanov
38 Russia GK Aleksandr Akishin
39 Russia FW Denis Anisimov
43 Russia DF Andrei Chernetsov
44 Russia DF Aleksandr Logunov
46 Russia DF Artyom Vyatkin
52 Russia MF Sergei Makarov
56 Russia DF Tomas Rukas
No. Position Player
57 Russia FW Artyom Galadjan
61 Russia DF Maksim Danilyantc
71 Russia DF Aleksey Solovyov
73 Russia DF Dzhamshed Rakhmonov
75 Russia DF Aleksandr Seraskhov
82 Russia MF Georgiy Makhatadze
83 Russia DF Viktor Fereferov
84 Russia FW Mikhail Lysov
87 Russia FW Nikolai Kipiani
96 Russia GK Ilya Ishchenko
97 Russia FW Grigoriy Gerasimov
98 Russia MF Ivan Galanin

Players loaned out[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Russia MF Maksim Grigoryev (at Russia Rostov until 30 June 2015)
Russia MF Aleksandr Lomakin (at Russia Yenisey Krasnoyarsk until 30 June 2015)
Russia MF Magomed Ozdoyev (at Russia Rubin Kazan until 30 June 2015)

League positions[edit]

Russian Premier League

Achievements[edit]

Domestic competitions[edit]

2002, 2004
1936, 1957, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2007
2003, 2005
    • Runners-up (1): 2008
1947, 1964, 1974

International competitions[edit]

2005
    • Runners-up: none
1974, 1976, 1979, 1983, 1987
    • Runners-up (1): 1963

Stadium[edit]

Lokomotiv play their home games at Lokomotiv Stadium. Its total seating capacity is 28,800 seats, all covered. The stadium was opened after reconstruction in 2002.

  • Highest attendance recorded: 32,333 people
  • Address: 107553, Moscow, Bolshaya Cherkizovskaya, 125
  • Telephone: +7 (495) 161-4283
  • Fax: +7 (495) 161-9977

League and Cup history[edit]

Soviet Union Soviet Union[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Cup Top scorer
(league)
Head coach
1936 (s) 1st 5 6 2 0 4 7 11 10 Soviet Union Lavrov – 3 Soviet Union Stolyarov
1936 (a) 4 7 4 0 3 18 14 15 W Soviet Union Lavrov – 6 Soviet Union Stolyarov
1937 6 16 5 5 6 18 20 31 SF Soviet Union Andriasyan – 6 France Limbeck
1938 8 25 12 6 7 44 37 30 R64 Soviet Union Lavrov – 11 Soviet Union Sushkov
1939 5 26 12 6 8 42 39 30 R16 Soviet Union Lakhonin – 8 Soviet Union Sushkov
1940 6 24 10 5 9 36 52 25 Soviet Union Kireev – 8
Soviet Union Kartsev – 8
Soviet Union Sushkov
1944 no competition R16
1945 12 22 1 3 18 14 54 5 R32 Soviet Union Lakhonin – 4 Soviet Union Sushkov
1946 2nd, "South" 7 24 10 6 8 46 33 26
1947 2nd, "Centre" 1 28 21 3 4 56 22 45 Qual.
2nd, Final 1 5 4 1 0 11 4 9
1948 1st 7 26 10 4 12 38 64 24 R16 Soviet Union Obotov – 17 Soviet Union Apukhtin
Soviet Union Maksimov
1949 11 34 11 8 15 59 56 30 R64 Soviet Union Lagutin – 13 Soviet Union Maksimov
Soviet Union Kachalin
1950 15 36 11 8 17 41 73 30 QF Soviet Union Panfilov – 14 Soviet Union Kachalin
1951 2nd 3 34 19 10 5 72 38 48 R64 Soviet Union Kachalin
1952 1st 9 13 5 2 6 19 21 12 R16 Soviet Union Panfilov – 4
Soviet Union I.Petrov – 4
Soviet Union Kachalin
Soviet Union Arkadyev
1953 6 20 6 6 8 21 28 18 SF Soviet Union Korotkov – 5 Soviet Union Arkadyev
1954 10 24 7 7 10 21 23 21 R16 Soviet Union Goryansky – 6 Soviet Union Arkadyev
1955 5 22 9 7 6 32 27 25 SF Soviet Union Razumovsky – 9 Soviet Union Arkadyev
1956 10 22 5 8 9 38 28 18 Soviet Union Sokolov – 9 Soviet Union Arkadyev
1957 4 22 12 4 6 39 27 28 W Soviet Union Sokolov – 12 Soviet Union Arkadyev
1958 5 22 9 6 7 48 34 24 SF Soviet Union Voroshilov – 10 Soviet Union Eliseev
1959 2 22 12 5 5 42 25 29 Soviet Union Sokolov – 14 Soviet Union Eliseev
1960 5 30 14 6 10 45 46 34 R32 Soviet Union Sokolov – 16 Soviet Union Morozov
1961 5 30 13 12 5 58 42 38 QF Soviet Union Voroshilov – 20 Soviet Union Morozov
1962 13 30 8 9 13 38 45 27 R32 Soviet Union Latyshev – 8 Soviet Union Morozov
Soviet Union A. Kostylev
1963 17 38 5 19 14 37 54 29 R32 Soviet Union Syagin – 8
Soviet Union Spiridonov – 8
Soviet Union Arkadyev
1964 2nd 1 40 19 15 6 45 30 53 R32 Soviet Union Bubukin – 14 Soviet Union Arkadyev
1965 1st 15 32 8 8 16 37 48 24 R16 Soviet Union Gorshkov – 13 Soviet Union Arkadyev
Soviet Union Rogov
1966 17 36 11 5 20 34 49 27 R32 Soviet Union V. Kozlov – 14 Soviet Union Beskov
Soviet Union Bubukin
1967 17 36 7 14 15 33 37 28 QF Soviet Union Kokh – 9 Soviet Union Bubukin
1968 10 38 10 17 11 35 39 37 R32 Soviet Union Kokh – 10 Soviet Union Bubukin
1969 18 34 8 9 17 33 47 25 R32 Soviet Union Atamalyan – 8 Soviet Union Maryenko
1970 2nd 4 42 20 10 12 53 39 50 R32 Soviet Union Atamalyan – 14 Soviet Union Maryenko
Soviet Union Rogov
1971 2 42 25 12 5 81 33 62 R32 Soviet Union A. Kozlov – 22 Soviet Union Rogov
1972 1st 15 30 6 9 15 29 48 21 QF Soviet Union Y. Chesnokov – 8
Soviet Union Piskunov – 8
Soviet Union Rogov
Soviet Union Volchok
1973 2nd 3 38 20 8 10 47 32 46 R32 Soviet Union Y. Chesnokov – 14 Soviet Union Yakushin
Soviet Union Volchok
1974 1 38 23 7 8 73 33 53 R32 Soviet Union Y. Chesnokov – 20 Soviet Union Volchok
1975 1st 11 30 7 12 11 28 33 26 QF 5x players – 4 Soviet Union Volchok
1976 (s) 15 15 3 3 9 17 23 9 3x players – 3 Soviet Union Volchok
1976 (a) 8 15 6 3 6 13 13 15 R16 Soviet Union Averyanov – 3
Soviet Union Nodiya – 3
Soviet Union Volchok
1977 6 30 9 14 7 27 25 32 R32 Soviet Union Nodiya – 5 Soviet Union Volchok
1978 15 30 7 9 14 26 40 22 SF Soviet Union V. Gazzaev – 6 Soviet Union Volchok, from 27 August Soviet Union Maryenko
1979 12 34 8 12 14 44 57 24 GS Soviet Union Petrakov – 17 Soviet Union Maryenko
1980 18 34 8 9 17 34 44 25 GS Soviet Union Petrakov – 12 Soviet Union Maryenko
1981 2nd 3 46 21 15 10 65 41 54 R16 Soviet Union Mukhanov – 22 Soviet Union A. Sevidov
1982 4 42 21 13 8 63 32 54 GS Soviet Union Mukhanov – 17 Soviet Union A. Sevidov
1983 15 42 13 13 16 51 47 38 R32 Soviet Union Mukhanov – 11
Soviet Union M. Chesnokov – 11
Soviet Union V. Rodionov
Soviet Union Volchok
1984 6 42 17 13 12 44 37 46 R64 Soviet Union A. Kalashnikov – 8 Soviet Union Volchok
1985 6 42 16 11 15 52 51 43 R64 Soviet Union A. Kalashnikov – 14 Soviet Union Volchok
1986 6 46 21 11 14 63 48 53 R32 Soviet Union Gladilin – 16 Soviet Union Semin
1987 2 42 23 13 6 59 26 58 R128 Soviet Union A. Kalashnikov – 13 Soviet Union Semin
1988 1st 7 30 10 12 8 35 29 30 R32 Soviet Union Rusyaev – 15 Soviet Union Semin
1989 15 30 7 9 14 20 32 23 R32 Soviet Union Rusyaev – 9 Soviet Union Semin
1990 2nd 4 38 19 9 10 52 34 47 RU Soviet Union Sukhov – 11 Soviet Union Semin
1991 1st 16 30 5 8 17 18 47 18 SF Soviet Union Belarus Kondratyev – 7 Soviet Union Russia Filatov
1992 no competition SF Russia Semin

Russia Russia[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Cup Europe Top scorer
(league)
Head coach
1992 1st 4 26 13 7 6 34 25 33 Tajikistan Mukhamadiev – 7 Russia Semin
1993 5 34 14 11 9 45 29 39 R16 Russia Al. Smirnov – 9 Russia Semin
1994 3 30 12 12 6 49 28 36 QF UC R64 Russia Garin – 20 Russia Semin
1995 2 30 20 5 5 52 23 55 QF Russia Garin – 13 Russia Semin
1996 6 34 15 10 9 46 31 55 W UC R64 Russia Kosolapov – 10 Russia Semin
1997 5 34 15 9 10 47 37 54 W CWC R16 Russia Kosolapov – 9 Russia Semin
1998 3 30 16 7 7 45 28 55 RU CWC SF Russia Borodyuk – 8
Georgia (country) Janashiya – 9
Russia Semin
1999 2 30 20 5 5 62 30 65 R32 CWC SF Russia Loskov – 14 Russia Semin
2000 2 30 18 8 4 50 20 62 W UC R64 Russia Loskov – 15 Russia Semin
2001 2 30 16 8 6 53 24 56 W UC R32 Nigeria Obiorah – 14 Russia Semin
2002 1 31 20 9 2 47 14 69 R32 UC R32 Russia Loskov – 7
Russia Evseev – 7
Russia Pimenov – 7
Russia Semin
2003 4 30 15 7 8 54 33 52 R16 ECL 2GS Russia Loskov – 14 Russia Semin
2004 1 30 18 7 5 44 19 61 QF ECL R16 Russia Sychev – 15 Russia Semin
2005 3 30 14 14 2 41 18 56 R32 Russia Bilyaletdinov – 8 Russia Semin
Russia Eshtrekov
2006 3 30 15 8 7 47 34 53 QF UCL
UC
3Q
R32
Russia Loskov – 13 Serbia Muslin
Russia Dolmatov
2007 7 30 11 8 11 39 42 41 W UC 1R Russia Sychev – 11 Russia Byshovets
2008 7 30 13 8 9 37 32 47 R32 UC GS Nigeria Odemwingie – 10 Russia Rakhimov
2009 4 30 15 9 6 43 30 54 R32 Russia Sychev – 12 Russia Rakhimov
Russia Uzbekistan Maminov
Russia Semin
2010 5 30 13 9 8 34 29 48 R32 EL Play-off Round Ukraine Aliyev – 14 Russia Semin
2011–12 7 44 18 12 14 59 48 66 QF EL R32 Russia Glushakov – 11 Russia Krasnozhan
Russia Uzbekistan Maminov
Portugal Couceiro
2012–13 9 30 12 7 11 39 36 43 R16 Senegal N'Doye – 10 Croatia Bilić
2013–14 3 30 17 8 5 51 23 59 R32 Senegal N'Doye – 13 Belarus Kuchuk
2014–15 ' ' EL Play-off Round Belarus Kuchuk
Tajikistan Cherevchenko
Montenegro Božović

Notable players[edit]

Had international caps for their respective countries. Players whose name is listed in bold represented their countries while playing for Lokomotiv.

Club records[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]