FC Shakhtar Donetsk

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"FC Shakhtar" redirects here. For the volleyball club, see VC Shakhtar Donetsk. For the futsal club, see MFC Shakhtar Donetsk. For the handball club, see Shakhtar-Academiya. For other uses, see Shakhtar.
Shakhtar Donetsk
Club crest
Full name Football Club Shakhtar Donetsk
Nickname(s) Hirnyky (The Miners), Kroty (The Moles)
Founded 24 May 1936; 78 years ago (1936-05-24)
Ground Donbass Arena, Donetsk
Ground Capacity 52,187[1]
Chairman Rinat Akhmetov
Manager Mircea Lucescu
League Ukrainian Premier League
2013–14 Premier League, 1st
Website Club home page
Current season
Departments of Shakhtar Donetsk
Football pictogram.svg Volleyball (indoor) pictogram.svg Handball pictogram.svg
Football Volleyball Handball
Futsal pictogram.svg
Futsal

Football Club Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukrainian: Футбольний клуб «Шахта́р» Доне́цьк [fʊdˈbolʲnɨj kɫup ʂäxˈtär doˈnɛt͡sʲk]) is a Ukrainian professional football club from the city of Donetsk.

Shakhtar has appeared in several European competitions and is often a participant of the UEFA Champions League. The club became the first club in independent Ukraine to win the UEFA Cup in 2009, the last year before the competition was revamped as the Europa League. FC Shakhtar Donetsk is one of two Ukrainian clubs, the other one is Dynamo Kyiv, who have won a major UEFA competition. The club normally plays its home matches at the Donbass Arena. However, because of the conflict in Eastern Ukraine, this season home games are being played more than 600 miles to the west in Arena Lviv.[2] Shakhtar Donetsk is Ukraine's second most popular football club.[3] The club is the sole favorite of football fans in the Donbas.[3]

The club draws its history from the very start of the Soviet football league competitions and is one of the oldest clubs in Ukraine. The club was a member of the Soviet Voluntary Sports Society of Shakhtyor, having connections with other Soviet teams from Karaganda (Kazakhstan), Soligorsk (Belarus), among others. In the late Soviet period, Shakhtar was considered a tough mid-table club of the Soviet Top League and a cup competition specialist after winning the Soviet Cup two years in a row in 1961 and 1962.

The team has played under the following names: Stakhanovets (1936–1946), Shakhtyor (Shakhtar) (1946–1992), and FC Shakhtar (since 1992).

History overview[edit]

Football came to the Donetsk region in the time of the Russian Empire when the industrialization of the country began. Numerous foreigners, particularly British workers, were forming their own football teams. In September 1911, at the factory of Novorossiysk Association (currently Donetsk Steel Works Factory – DMZ) owned by John Hughes has created the Yuzovka Sports Association which contained a football club as well. The football team existed until 1919. In the 1920s, the club was reorganized into the one of Vladimir Lenin's club. One of the most prominent players of that period was Viktor Shylovsky[4] who became famous, however, playing for Dynamo Kiev.

The club Shakhtar was originally formed in May 1936 and was initially named Stakhanovets, meaning "the participant of Stakhanovite movement," which derived from Aleksei Stakhanov, a coal-miner in the Donets basin and propaganda celebrity in 1935. The first team was based upon two other local teams, the participants of the All-Ukrainian Spartakiads: Dynamo Horlivka and Stalino. The first game was unofficial against Dynamo Odessa and took place on 12 May 1936 at Balitsky Stadium. The team lost it 3–2 after scoring the first goal. Its first official game with Dynamo Kazan was even more disappointing, which they lost 4–1. Nonetheless, the selective job conducted constructively by the clubs administration allowed the club to compete successfully at the top level by the end 1930s. During the war championship of 1941, which was interrupted unexpectedly, the club defeated Soviet champions Dynamo Moscow and after about ten games were placed in fifth position. In the last game of that championship, they played on 24 June, two days after the start of the Great Patriotic War,[5] which they lost at home to Traktor Stalingrad.[6]

The team in 1937.

The All-Union coal mining society of Stakhanovite had changed its name in July 1946 to Shakhtyor. In 1950 Viktor Fomin was named Ukrainian Footballer of the Year, even though the club finished only 11th in the league. The first success for the team was in 1951, when it achieved third place in the USSR Championship. The most notable player of that achievement was the striker Aleksandr Ponomarev, who came to finish his football career in Donbass, the region he was born at, and was named Ukrainian Footballer of the Year for 1951. Despite the latest achievement, Shakhtar was relegated at the end of the 1952 season, and as part of the re-organization of the team, the former player Aleksandr Ponomarev became the head coach of the club. In 1954, Shakhtar under Ponomarev won the Class B League, and returned to the top league.

In 1958 the players of the club received less yellow and red cards then any other team in the championship, for what the Sovetsky Sport newspaper awarded the club with the "Fair Play Award".[7] In the 1960s, Shakhtar, under Oleg Oshenkov’s coaching, were three-time USSR Cup finalists, winning it twice in 1961 and 1962. Among the players playing for the club then where defenders Viacheslav Aliabiev and Vladimir Salkov. The club was nicknamed "The Cup Team" due to Shakhtar’s success in vying for the trophy every year. The Miners’ more notable achievements, however, occurred later from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s.

Despite the departure of the teams leader midfielder Anatoliy Konkov, in 1975, Shakhtar under management of former player Vladimir Salkov, earned second place in the USSR Championship and received the right to represent the Soviet Union in European competition. At the end of the season Shakhtar received the Progress Cup, for making the biggest progress from previous season in the league (they received the award again in 1977). In 1978, Shakhtar finished third in the USSR Championship. A year later, the team finished second in the league campaign and its captain — striker Vitaliy Starukhin — became the top scorer in the USSR Championship with 26 goals scored and was named the Soviet Footballer of the Year. The club was only 2 points away from the first place, despite having important players leaving the club before the season, and other important players receiving injuries.[8] Other important players besides Starukhin at the time were Mykhaylo Sokolovsky, who went on to set a caps record for the club (for what he received the Club Loyalty Award in 1987), defenders Viktor Zvyahintsev and Valeriy Horbunov, who both made it numerous times to the 33 Top Players of the Soviet Championship lists, and goalie Yuriy Dehteryov who was named Soviet goalie of the year and took 3rd place for Soviet Footballer of the Year in 1977.[9]

Shakhtar twice, in 1980 and 1983, brought home the crystal USSR Cup to Donetsk and in 1983, it won the USSR Super Cup over then-domestic league champions Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk. Shakhtar reached the 1983–84 European Cup Winners' Cup quarter-final, and strikers Viktor Hrachov and Serhiy N. Morozov became joint top scorers of the tournament. In 1987 Shakhtar Donetsk received the smallest amount of yellow and red cards in the championship, for which the club was awarded the "Soviet Top League Fair Play Award" by the Man and Law Magazine.[10] Between 1982 and 1988 Shakhtar received the "Together With The Club" award 5 times, an award given for good organization of home games and behavior of the home fans.[11]

In the newly independent Ukraine, Shakhtar, along with Dynamo Kyiv, became perennial first place competitors. In October 1995, a bombing-assassination took place at the team's stadium, killing team President Akhat Bragin. In the year that followed, Rinat Akhmetov took over as President and subsequently invested heavily in the club.[12]

Even though Shakhtar was not a contester for the championship at the time, finishing second many times with a big point gap from the first place, they won the Ukrainian Cup three times in 1995 (under the management of former player Vladimir Salkov), 1997 and 2001. In the 1997–98 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, Shakhtar were eliminated after a 5–2 aggregate loss to Italian club Vicenza, losing the first and second legs. Important players at the time were defenders Serhiy Popov and Mykhaylo Starostyak, goalkeeper Dmytro Shutkov, striker Oleh Matveyev, who was top scorer of the Ukrainian Premier League in season 1996/97, and midfielders Hennadiy Orbu, Valeriy Kriventsov and Ihor Petrov. Most of the players plying for the team of the time came through the teams youth ranks.

Towards the end of the decade, the team finally started to look like a team able to become champion. In 1999, a Shakhtar football academy was opened and now hosts football training for roughly 3,000 children. In 2000 Andriy Vorobey was named Ukrainian Footballer of the Year by Komanda, the first Shakhtar player in independent Ukraine to do so, and became the top scorer in the 2000–01 Ukrainian Premier League.

The club won their first ever Ukrainian Premier League title in the 2001-02 season, under coach Nevio Scala, winning by a single point over Dynamo Kyiv. They were also victorious in the 2001-02 Ukrainian Cup, defeating Dynamo 3–2 after extra time in the Final.[13] Among the main players at the club at the time were captin defensive midfielder Anatoliy Tymoschuk, striker Andriy Vorobey, midfielder Hennadiy Zubov and defender Mykhaylo Starostyak. At the end of the season Tymoschuk, who emerged as the club's leader on the field, was named Ukrainian Footballer of the Year according to Komanda and Ukrainskiy Football.

After few manager changes, in 2004 Mircea Lucescu was invited to built a team in Shakhtar. After 10 days at the club he won the 2003–04 Ukrainian Cup, and after three month for the first time in club history the club made it to the UEFA Champions League group stage, which won him the 2004 Romania Coach of the Year title.[9] The strategy chosen was looking for young talented players in Brazil, which will form the base of the attack, while the defense will be mostly local (in order to adjust to rules forcing teams to have a certain number of local players on the field).[14][15] The big amount of Brazilian players arriving to the club through the years earned Shakhtar the nickname "the most Brazilian club in Europe".[16][17][18][19][20][21] They won their second Premier League title in the 2004-05 season. They lost to Dynamo Kyiv in the inaugural Ukrainian Super Cup tournament in 2004. They finished as runners up in the 2004-05 Ukrainian Cup, losing to Dynamo in a penalty shoot-out the Final.[22]

They retained the Premier League crown in the 2005–06 season and managed to avenge the defeat to Dynamo in the previous Super Cup by defeating them on penalties to win their first ever Super Cup title.[23] At the end of the season Anatoliy Tymoschuk was named Ukrainian Footballer of the Year for by Ukrainskiy Football for the second time, becoming the first Shakhtar player to be named so more than once. Brazilian striker Brandao became league joint top scorer.

Shakhtar appeared in all three editions of the Channel One Cup, winning the 2006 edition and finishing runners up in 2008. Having missed out on the league title in the 2006–07 season,[24] Shakhtar regained the title in the 2007–08 season. They were also victorious in the Ukrainian Cup, defeating Dynamo Kyiv 2–0 in the final.[25] Shakhtar's attendance levels at league matches have continually risen over the years to a point where they averaged 36,983 spectators over the 2011–12 Premier League season.

In 2009, they became only the second Ukrainian team to win a European competition (and the first since independence), and the first to win the UEFA Cup, beating Werder Bremen in the final, with goals from Brazilians Luiz Adriano and Jádson.[26] The victory earned the player Mariusz Lewandowski the 2009 Polish Footballer of the Year award. This also made them the last UEFA Cup winners before the tournament was rebranded as the UEFA Europa League.

Before the start of the 2009/10 season, Shakhtar won the friendly Uhrencup tournament. Shakhtar won the Premier League title in the 2009–10 season,[27] goalkeeper Andriy Pyatov was named Ukraine Premier League MVP by Komanda, and Manager Mircea Lucescu was named Romania Coach of the Year, for the second time. The 2010–11 season was a very successful one for Shakhtar. They reached the quarter-final stage of the Champions League, their best ever performance in the competition at that time.[28] Captain Darijo Srna was chosen to be part of the Champions League team of the season as voted by fans.[29] They also won a domestic treble with victory in the Premier League, Ukrainian Cup, and the Super Cup.[30] The successful season didn't go unnoticed by the experts, and in 2011 the IFFHS gave Shakhtar a special award for making the biggest progress of the decade among football clubs.[31][32] They then went on to win the Premier League and Ukrainian Cup in the 2011–12 season.[33] Shakhtar player Yevhen Seleznyov topped the goal scoring charts in the league, with 14 goals, midfielder Henrikh Mkhitaryan was named Armenian Footballer of the Year, and manager Mircea Lucescu was named Romania Coach of the Year, for the third time. The main players at that time were captain Darijo Srna, defender Yaroslav Rakitskiy, Armenian midfielder Henrikh Mkhitaryan (who was named Armenian Footballer of the Year twice while playing for Shakhtar), and Brazilian midfielders Fernandinho and Willian.

In the 2012-13 season Shakhtar managed to win the Premier League, Cup and Super Cup. Henrikh Mkhitaryan became the top scorer of the league, setting a Ukrainian championship record of 25 goals. Mkhitaryan was also named the Ukraine Premier League MVP by Komanda, Armenian Footballer of the Year and the CIS Footballer of the Year for 2012. However, by the end of the season many of the main players of the club were sold after Shakhtar accepted high bids on them. Henrikh Mkhitaryan, Fernandinho and Willian brought the club over 100 million Euros, and Shakhtar spent the following summer trying to integrate new young players into the team, who along with the remaining players are supposed to form the backbone of the renewed Shakhtar.[34][35][36] Despite selling its leaders, before season 2013-14 Shakhtar set a new record for East Europe for number of season tickets sold.[37] Before the beginning of the 2013/14 season, Shakhtar won two friendly tournaments in Abu Dhabi, the Match World Cup, and the Super Cup of Champions played against the Russian champion Zenit St Petersburg.[38] In the mid-season break, Shakhtar won the 2014 United Supercup (the second edition of the United Tournament), a tournament between the top-two placed clubs of Ukraine and of Russia,[39][40] which strengthened Shakhtar's status as the strongest club in Eastern Europe.[36][41][42] At the end of the 2013–14 season Shakhtar won the Ukraine Premier League, while Luiz Adriano became the league top scorer. Shakhtar also won the 2014 Ukrainian Super Cup, holding the trophy for the 6th time.

Stadiums[edit]

Until 2009 Shakhtar has been playing most of its games at the RSC Olimpiyskiy stadium. The construction of a new stadium, Donbass Arena, finished and it was opened on 29 August 2009. The stadium has a capacity of 50,149 and has been awarded a UEFA five star rating, the highest rating achievable. Shakhtar's old home, the central Shakhtar Stadium which was built in 1936 and reconstructed four times, is currently being used by Shakhtar Donetsk Reserves. The stadium received some major renovations, including the installation of bench seats in 2000 when Shakhtar made it to the Champions League Group Stage.

A mascot mole (moles is a nickname for the club) will entertain spectators during the home matches. Shakhtar are rated 40th by the average game attendance, being the top eastern European club on the rating charts.[43] Before season 2013-14 Shakhtar set a new record for Eastern Europe for number of season tickets sold, selling 27,000 season tickets, which means 52% of the seats in Donbass Arena belong to season tickets holders.[37]

Due to conflict in Eastern Ukraine, Shakhtar and Metalurh Donetsk are playing this season at the Arena Lviv in Lviv.[44][45]

Training centre[edit]

Shakhtar Donetsk has its own training facilities for its first team, reserve team and youth academy all located at Kirsha Training Centre. During the period when their temporary venue for its home matches is Arena Lviv the team will use training facilities in Kiev.[45]

Crests and colours[edit]

Public billboard in Donetsk, using the Russian name of the club

The first logo of the club was designed in 1936, it featured a blue hexagon, with a red 'S' in the middle, crossed over by a jackhammer. In 1946, when the club was renamed, the logo was changed to black and white, with addition of club's name. Later, in the middle of the 1960s, their logo depicted two crossed hammers, with "Shakhtar Donetsk" written in the circle. The crest was added to the kit and remained there since, except for several seasons in the beginning of the 1990s. The club's name was depicted in the Russian language, until the latest logo was chosen. Therefore, some sources have its name written often as "Shakhter" or rarely "Shakhtyor."

In 1989, an artist, Viktor Savilov, on the event of the club restructuring offered a draft variant of a logo with elements of the ball and a pitch. Some time later, the logo was remodelled into the present one. The emblem was added to the kit in 1997.[46]

In 2008, during the presentation of the club's new stadium, Shakhtar's new logo was unveiled. For the first time in over 30 years, the crossed hammers, the traditional symbols of the club, were present on the crest. Also, for the first time the name was written in the Ukrainian language and not Russian.

Former kits[edit]

Stakhanovets
Shakhtar '50s
Since 1961
Shakhtar '70s
Since 1983
Since 1986


Football kits and sponsors[edit]

Years[47] Football kit Shirt sponsor
1992-1998 Adidas Carlsberg
1998-2005 DCC[48][49]
2005-2006 life:)
2006-2007 SCM
2008–present Nike

Rivalry[edit]

Shakhtar's biggest rival today is Dynamo Kyiv. The match between them has grown into what is called the Ukrainian derby. The stadiums in Kiev and Donetsk are nearly full for matches between the two teams and are the main football events within the country. On the other hand "ultras" – fanatical supporters of Shakhtar – fought alongside their Dynamo arch-rivals during the violent street protests of the 2014 Ukrainian revolution.[50] They later provided security for pro-Ukrainian demonstrators during the 2014 pro-Russian protests in Donetsk.[51]

The other rivalry with Metalurh Donetsk is local and, although not as significant as games against the rivals from the capital, the games between the two Donetsk teams have been proclaimed the Donetsk Derby.

Among the extinguished rivalries are the games against Spartak Moscow and, particularly, the third place champions Dinamo Tbilisi of Georgia that took place at times during the Soviet Top League. Another interesting rivalry, the Donbas Derby, is with Zorya Luhansk, which gather a significant crowd in Luhansk. During the early Ukrainian championships, another interesting rivalry developed with Chornomorets Odessa labelled the "Miners vs. Sailors," which declined with the turn of the millennium due to inconsistent performance of the Odessa-based club.

Honours[edit]

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

The squad is as of 2 September 2014.[53][54]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
4 Ukraine DF Oleksandr Volovyk
5 Ukraine DF Oleksandr Kucher
6 Ukraine MF Taras Stepanenko
7 Brazil MF Wellington Nem
8 Brazil MF Fred
9 Brazil FW Luiz Adriano (vice-captain)
10 Brazil MF Bernard
11 Brazil MF Marlos
12 Ukraine GK Rustam Khudzhamov
13 Ukraine DF Vyacheslav Shevchuk
17 Brazil MF Fernando
18 Ukraine DF Ivan Ordets
20 Brazil MF Douglas Costa
21 Ukraine FW Oleksandr Hladkyy
No. Position Player
23 Ukraine GK Bohdan Sarnavskyi
27 Ukraine DF Dmytro Chyhrynskyi
28 Brazil MF Taison
29 Brazil MF Alex Teixeira
30 Ukraine GK Andriy Pyatov
31 Brazil DF Ismaily
32 Ukraine GK Anton Kanibolotskyi
33 Croatia DF Darijo Srna (captain)
35 Ukraine GK Mykyta Kryukov
38 Ukraine DF Serhiy Kryvtsov
44 Ukraine DF Yaroslav Rakytskiy
66 Brazil DF Márcio Azevedo
77 Brazil MF Ilsinho
89 Brazil FW Dentinho

Out on loan[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Ukraine GK Mykyta Shevchenko (on loan to Zorya Luhansk)
Ukraine GK Yaroslav Stavytskyi (on loan to Zorya Luhansk)
Ukraine DF Taras Kacharaba (on loan to Hoverla Uzhhorod)
Ukraine DF Bohdan Butko (on loan to Illichivets Mariupol)
Ukraine DF Mykola Ischenko (on loan to Illichivets Mariupol)
Ukraine DF Mykhaylo Pysko (on loan to Zorya Luhansk)
Ukraine DF Eduard Sobol (on loan to Metalurh Donetsk)
Ukraine MF Maksym Malyshev (on loan to Zorya Luhansk)
Ukraine MF Maksym Zhychykov (on loan to Sumy)
Ukraine MF Vitaliy Vitsenets (on loan to Illichivets Mariupol)
Georgia (country) MF David Targamadze (on loan to Illichivets Mariupol)
Ukraine MF Andriy Totovytskyi (on loan to Illichivets Mariupol)
Ukraine MF Vyacheslav Churko (on loan to Illichivets Mariupol)
Ukraine MF Oleksiy Polyanskyi (on loan to Hoverla Uzhhorod)
No. Position Player
Ukraine MF Vasyl Kobin (on loan to Metalist Kharkiv)
Ukraine MF Denys Kozhanov (on loan to Karpaty Lviv)
Ukraine MF Serhiy Hryn (on loan to Illichivets Mariupol)
Ukraine MF Dmytro Hrechyshkin (on loan to Chornomorets Odesa)
Brazil MF Alan Patrick (on loan to Internacional)
Ukraine MF Ruslan Malinovskyi (on loan to Zorya Luhansk)
Ukraine MF Oleksandr Karavayev (on loan to Zorya Luhansk)
Ukraine MF Illya Hlushytskyi (on loan to Hoverla Uzhhorod)
Russia MF Roman Yemelyanov (on loan to Ural)
Ukraine FW Serhiy Bolbat (on loan to Metalist Kharkiv)
Ukraine FW Anton Shynder (on loan to Chornomorets Odesa)
Ukraine FW Pylyp Budkivskyi (on loan to Zorya Luhansk)
Ukraine FW Vladyslav Kulach (on loan to Illichivets Mariupol)
Argentina FW Facundo Ferreyra (on loan to Newcastle United)

Current coaching staff[edit]

Position Name
Manager Mircea Lucescu
Assistant Manager Antônio Carlos Zago
Assistant Manager Alexandru Spiridon
Fitness Coach Carlo Nicolini
Fitness Coach Massimo Ugolini
Goalkeeping Coach Tomislav Rogić
Goalkeeping Coach Dmytro Shutkov
Reserve Team Manager Miguel Cardoso
Reserve Team Assistant Manager Anatoliy Skyrchuk
Reserve Team Assistant Manager Serhiy Kovalyov
Reserve Team Physical Training Coach Volodymyr Rashevskyi
Reserve Team Goalkeeping Coach Borys Tkachov

Player records[edit]

Top goalscorers[edit]

As of 3 August 2014

# Name Years League Cup Europe Other Total
1 Ukraine Vorobey, AndriyAndriy Vorobey[55] 1998–2007 80 22 12 0 114
2 Soviet Union Starukhin, VitaliyVitaliy Starukhin[56] 1973–1981 84 23 3 0 110
3 Brazil , Luiz AdrianoLuiz Adriano 2007– 69 13 23 3 108
4 Soviet Union Sokolovsky, MykhayloMykhaylo Sokolovsky[57] 1974–1987 87 11 5 2 105
5 Brazil , BrandãoBrandão [58] 2002–2008 65 11 15 0 91
6 Soviet Union Petrov, IhorIhor Petrov[59] 1982–1991
1994–1996
1998
70 12 2 0 84
7 Ukraine Atelkin, SerhiySerhiy Atelkin[60] 1990–1995
1996–1997
2000–2002
61 9 12 0 82
8 Soviet Union Hrachov, ViktorViktor Hrachov[61] 1980–1981
1982–1990
1994
65 10 5 0 82
9 Ukraine Matveyev, OlehOleh Matveyev[62] 1992–1995
1996–2000
61 16 1 0 78
10 Ukraine Zubov, HennadiyHennadiy Zubov[63] 1994–2004 57 10 6 0 73
  • Other – National Super Cup

Most appearances[edit]

As of 3 August 2014

# Name Years League Cup Europe Other Total
1 Soviet Union Sokolovsky, MykhayloMykhaylo Sokolovsky 1974–1987 400 63 18 4 485
2 Soviet Union Yashchenko, SerhiySerhiy Yashchenko [64] 1982–1995 384 51 8 1 444
3 Croatia Srna, DarijoDarijo Srna 2003– 268 38 103 9 418
4 Soviet Union Dehteryov, YuriyYuriy Dehteryov[65] 1967–1983 321 47 10 0 378
5 Ukraine Shutkov, DmytroDmytro Shutkov[66] 1991–2008 267 56 24 0 347
6 Soviet Union Rudakov, ValeriyValeriy Rudakov [67] 1974–1986 277 44 16 3 340
7 Soviet Union Yaremchenko, ValeriyValeriy Yaremchenko[68] 1966–1978 297 32 8 0 337
8 Soviet Union Hrachov, ViktorViktor Hrachov 1980–1981
1982–1990
1994
282 40 6 3 331
9 Soviet Union Petrov, IhorIhor Petrov 1982–1991
1994–1996
1998
281 39 10 1 331
10 Ukraine Tymoshchuk, AnatoliyAnatoliy Tymoshchuk[69] 1998–2006 227 40 57 2 326
  • Other – National Super Cup

Head coaches[edit]

Years Name Trophies
1936–37 Soviet Union Nikolay Naumov
1938 Soviet Union Vasiliy Borisenko
1938 Soviet Union Grigoriy Arkhangelsky
1939–41 Soviet Union Abram Dangulov
1944–45 Soviet Union Nikolay Kuznetsov
1946–48 Soviet Union Aleksey Kostylev
1949 Soviet Union Georgiy Mazanov
1949–51 Soviet Union Viktor Novikov
1952 Soviet Union Konstantyn Kvashnin
1952–56 Soviet Union Aleksandr Ponomarev 1 Soviet First League
1956–57 Soviet Union Vasiliy Yermilov
1958 Soviet Union Abram Dangulov
1959 Soviet Union Viktor Novikov
1959–60 Soviet Union Konstantyn Shegodsky
1960–69 Soviet Union Oleg Oshenkov 2 Soviet Cup
1969–70 Soviet Union Yuriy Voynov
1970–71 Soviet Union Artem Falyan
1971 Soviet Union Yuriy Zakharov
1971–72 Soviet Union Nikolai Morozov
1972–73 Soviet Union Oleh Bazylevych
1974 Soviet Union Yuriy Zakharov
1974–78 Soviet Union Vladimir Salkov
1979–85 Soviet Union Viktor Nosov 2 Soviet Cup
1 USSR Super Cup
1986 Soviet Union Oleh Bazylevych
1987–89 Soviet Union Anatoliy Kon'kov
1989–94 Soviet Union/Ukraine Valeriy Yaremchenko
1995 Ukraine Vladimir Salkov 1 Ukrainian Cup
1995–96 Ukraine Valeriy Rudakov
1 Aug 1996 – 30 March 1999 Ukraine Valeriy Yaremchenko 1 Ukrainian Cup
1 April 1999–Sept 30, 1999 Russia Anatoliy Byshovets
1999 Ukraine Oleksiy Drozdenko
30 Nov 1999 – 12 Oct 2001 Ukraine Viktor Prokopenko 1 Ukrainian Cup
12 Oct 2001 – 31 Dec 2001 Ukraine Valeriy Yaremchenko (interim)
1 Jan 2002–Sept 18, 2002 Italy Nevio Scala 1 Ukrainian Premier League
1 Ukrainian Cup
Sept 18, 2002–30 June 2003 Ukraine Valeriy Yaremchenko
1 July 2003 – 3 May 2004 Germany Bernd Schuster
8 May 2004 – 20 June 2004 Ukraine Viktor Prokopenko
17 May 2004– Romania Mircea Lucescu 7 Ukrainian Premier League
5 Ukrainian Cup
5 Ukrainian Super Cup
1 UEFA Cup

League and Cup history[edit]

Soviet Union Soviet Union[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe Notes
1936 3 spring 7 7 2 1 4 14 24 12 1/32
3 fall 6 7 3 0 4 11 14 13
1937 3 3 9 4 4 1 20 13 21 1/64 Promoted
1938 1 11 25 11 7 7 56 51 29 1/4
1939 1 12 26 5 10 11 40 55 20 1/4
1940 1 12 24 6 4 14 32 43 16
1941 1 5 11 6 0 5 13 13 12
1945 2 5 17 9 5 3 36 25 23 1/8
1946 2 5 24 10 7 7 45 23 27
1947 2 2 24 15 4 5 48 19 34 1/32
1948 2 3 14 8 3 3 33 15 19 Promoted
1949 1 18 34 5 8 21 21 73 18 1/16
1950 1 11 36 13 7 16 49 63 11 1/8
1951 1 3 28 12 10 6 44 30 34 1/2
1952 1 13 13 1 6 6 14 26 8 1/32 Relegated
1953 2 1 14 9 4 1 33 9 22
1953 2 3 5 3 0 2 6 5 6 Semifinals
1954 2 1 22 17 4 1 56 16 38
1954 2 1 5 4 1 0 10 1 9 1/4 Promoted
1955 1st 7 22 4 10 8 23 34 18 1/8
1956 1st 7 22 7 7 8 30 39 21
1957 1st 8 22 7 5 10 19 35 19 1/4
1958 1st 8 22 9 3 10 22 32 21 1/8
1959 1st 12 22 4 5 13 24 43 13 Semifinals
1960 1st 17 30 9 8 13 34 48 26
1961 1st 12 32 12 10 10 45 37 34 Winner
1962 1st 8 32 15 7 10 47 35 37 Winner
1963 1st 11 38 11 14 13 29 33 36 Runner up
1964 1st 5 32 13 11 8 35 26 37 1/8
1965 1st 12 32 7 14 11 29 34 28 1/4
1966 1st 10 36 15 7 14 32 35 37
1967 1st 6 36 13 16 7 43 38 42 1/8
1968 1st 14 38 9 14 15 38 42 32 1/2
1969 1st (Group 2) 3 18 5 8 5 20 17 18 1/16 [70]
1st (Final) 10 26 6 8 12 20 28 20
1970 1st 10 32 11 8 13 35 50 30 1/16
1971 1st 16 30 10 4 16 31 37 24 1/4 Relegated
1972 2nd 2 38 19 13 6 57 21 51 1/16 Promoted
1973 1st 6 30 14 3 13 32 26 31 1/8
1974 1st 12 30 8 12 10 31 35 28 1/2
1975 1st 2 30 15 8 7 45 23 38 1/16
1976 1st spring 5 15 7 4 4 15 16 18 1/2
1st fall 10 15 5 4 6 12 10 14
1977 1st 5 30 9 16 5 31 24 34 1/4 UC 1/8
1978 1st 3 30 16 5 9 42 31 37 Runner up
1979 1st 2 34 20 8 6 57 33 48 Group stage UC 1/16
1980 1st 6 34 13 9 12 45 40 35 Winner UC 1/32
1981 1st 7 34 12 10 12 51 39 34 Group stage UC 1/32
1982 1st 14 34 10 9 15 42 57 29 Group stage
1983 1st 9 34 16 3 15 48 40 35 Winner
1984 1st 13 34 10 9 15 47 46 29 1/8 CWC 1/4
1985 1st 12 34 10 12 12 46 45 30 Runner up
1986 1st 6 30 11 9 10 40 38 31 Runner up
1987 1st 7 30 10 10 10 29 31 30 1/16
1988 1st 8 30 9 10 11 30 28 28 1/8
1989 1st 14 30 9 5 16 24 36 23 1/4
1990 1st 8 24 6 10 8 23 31 22 1/8
1991 1st 12 30 6 14 10 33 41 26 1/8

Ukraine Ukraine[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe Notes
1992 1st 4 18 10 6 2 31 10 26 1/2 finals yielded to FC Chornomorets Odessa
in 1/8 finals of Soviet Cup
1992–93 1st 4 30 11 12 7 44 32 34 1/16 finals
1993–94 1st 2 34 20 9 5 64 32 49 1/8 finals
1994–95 1st 4 34 18 8 8 52 29 62 Winner UC Qual round
1995–96 1st 10 34 13 6 15 44 43 45 1/2 finals CWC 1st round
1996–97 1st 2 30 19 5 6 72 28 62 Winner
1997–98 1st 2 30 20 7 3 61 25 67 1/8 finals CWC 2nd round
1998–99 1st 2 30 20 5 5 70 25 65 1/2 finals UC 2nd qual round
1999–2000 1st 2 30 21 3 6 60 16 66 1/4 finals UC 1st round
2000–01 1st 2 26 19 6 1 71 21 63 Winner UC 3rd round UCL – 1st group stage
2001–02 1st 1 26 20 6 0 49 10 66 Winner UC 1st round UCL – 3rd qual round
2002–03 1st 2 30 22 4 4 61 24 70 Runner-up UC 1st round UCL – 3rd qual round
2003–04 1st 2 30 22 4 4 62 19 70 Winner UC 1st round UCL – 3rd qual round
2004–05 1st 1 30 26 2 2 63 19 80 Runner-up UC Round of 16 UCL – group stage
2005–06 1st 1 30 23 6 1 64 14 75 1/8 finals UC Round of 32 UCL – 3rd qual round
2006–07 1st 2 30 19 6 5 57 20 63 Runner-up UC Round of 16 UCL – group stage
2007–08 1st 1 30 24 2 4 75 24 74 Winner UCL Group stage
2008–09 1st 2 30 19 7 4 47 16 64 Runner-up UC Winner UCL – group stage
2009–10 1st 1 30 24 5 1 62 18 77 1/2 finals EL Round of 32 UCL – 3rd qual round
2010–11 1st 1 30 23 3 4 53 16 72 Winner UCL Quarterfinals
2011–12 1st 1 30 25 4 1 80 18 79 Winner UCL Group stage
2012–13 1st 1 30 25 4 1 82 18 79 Winner UCL Round of 16
2013–14 1st 1 28 21 2 5 62 23 65 Runner-up UCL Group Stage
2014–15 1st UCL Group Stage

European history[edit]

Shakhtar Donetsk participates in European competitions since 1976 after playing its first against Berliner FC Dynamo in the UEFA Cup 1976-77. Since 1997, however, the club continuously participates on annual basis with variable successes, while also takes part in the UEFA Champions League competition since 2000. The first qualification to a group stage took place in the 2000-01 UEFA Champions League when Shakhtar Donetsk played against Arsenal, Lazio, and Sparta Prague.

Season Achievement Notes
European Cup / UEFA Champions League
2010–11 Quarter-Finalist eliminated by Spain Barcelona 1–5 in Barcelona, 0–1 in Donetsk
UEFA Cup
2008–09 Winner won Germany Werder Bremen 2–1 in Istanbul
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup
1983–84 Quarter-Finalist eliminated by Portugal Porto 2–3 in Porto, 1–1 in Donetsk
UEFA Super Cup
2009 Finalist defeated by Spain Barcelona 0–1 in Monaco


References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.uefa.com/MultimediaFiles/Download/StatDoc/competitions/UCL/01/67/63/79/1676379_DOWNLOAD.pdf
  2. ^ "Shakhtar Donetsk move training and games over Ukraine conflict". BBC Sport. 23 July 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  3. ^ a b Poll: 40% of Ukrainians consider themselves football supporters, most against idea of CIS league, Interfax-Ukraine (27 August 2013)
  4. ^ Shylovsky's profile
  5. ^ A local name for World War II military campaign against the Soviet Union
  6. ^ Club's History (English)
  7. ^ http://www.hsf.narod.ru/awards/fairplay1.htm
  8. ^ http://www.ua-football.com/ukrainian/high/52286911.html
  9. ^ a b http://sport.segodnya.ua/football/kratkaja-entsiklopedija-pobed-shakhtera.html
  10. ^ http://www.hsf.narod.ru/awards/fairplay2.htm
  11. ^ http://www.hsf.narod.ru/awards/wtc.htm
  12. ^ Wilson, Jonathan (30 April 2009). "Dynamo and Shakhtar Donetsk fight for Ukraine supremacy on European stage". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 2 May 2010. 
  13. ^ "Ukraine 2001/02". Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  14. ^ http://fairbet.su/2012/12/prichiny-uspexa-doneckogo-shaxtera-na-evropejskoj-futbolnoj-arene-ili-primer-vsem-klubam-byvshego-sssr/
  15. ^ http://football.ua/author/article/144624.html
  16. ^ http://www.ua-football.com/blogs/multi_media/521c8788.html
  17. ^ http://shakhtar.com/ru/news/28153
  18. ^ http://sport.rbc.ru/football/newsline/08/08/2013/400639.shtml
  19. ^ http://brettforrest.com/articles/europes-little-piece-of-brazil/
  20. ^ http://www.fifa.com/worldfootball/clubfootball/news/newsid=1394275.html
  21. ^ http://www.football365.com/f365-features/8308669/Shakhtar-Donetsk-A-Very-Modern-Football-Club
  22. ^ "Ukraine 2004/05". Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  23. ^ "Ukraine 2005/06". Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  24. ^ "Ukraine 2006/07". Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  25. ^ "Ukraine 2007/08". Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  26. ^ "S Donetsk 2–1 W Bremen (aet)". BBC Sport. 2009-05-20. Retrieved 2009-05-21. 
  27. ^ "Ukraine 2009/10". Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  28. ^ "Shakhtar Champions League 2010//1". Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  29. ^ http://www.goal.com/en-gb/news/2914/champions-league/2011/05/27/2505997/three-manchester-united-players-gareth-bale-included-in
  30. ^ "Ukraine 2010/11". Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  31. ^ http://www.sports.ru/football/79251555.html
  32. ^ a b http://shakhtar.com/en/news/21888
  33. ^ "Ukraine 2011/12". Retrieved 3 October 2012. 
  34. ^ http://www.ua-football.com/ukrainian/high/51e0631a.html
  35. ^ http://www.ua-football.com/ukrainian/high/5215b203.html
  36. ^ a b http://www.sports.ru/tribuna/blogs/thegooseandwater/569500.html
  37. ^ a b http://www.ua-football.com/ukrainian/high/51f65107.html
  38. ^ http://www.sport-express.ua/football/ukraina/news/196950-zenit-shahter-1-3-superkubok-chempionov.html
  39. ^ http://www.ua-football.com/ukrainian/news/52f2a347.html
  40. ^ http://sport.segodnya.ua/football/shahter-so-100-rezultatom-vyigral-obedinennyy-superkubok-494029.html
  41. ^ http://www.rma.ru/news/3830/
  42. ^ http://www.sports.ru/tribuna/blogs/thegooseandwater/569898.html
  43. ^ http://www.sports.ru/tribuna/blogs/fmpredictor/304989.html
  44. ^ (Ukrainian) "Формат і календар наступного Чемпіонату ПЛ" [Format and calendar of the next PFL Championship]. Ukrainian Premier League. 11 July 2014. Retrieved 11 July 2014. 
  45. ^ a b Shakhtar to play home matches in Lviv, Interfax-Ukraine (24 July 2014)
  46. ^ http://shakhtar.com/en/club/crest/ Short crest history
  47. ^ Jerseys of Ukrainian clubs
  48. ^ DCC was a Donetsk-based company in 1995 to 2006 when it was acquired by the Astelit better known as life :).
  49. ^ Digital Cellular Communication at InsideView
  50. ^ http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/04/ukraine-russia-protesters-donetsk-separate-by-force
  51. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/pro-unity-voices-east-ukraine-struggle-heard-191449196.html
  52. ^ «Шахтер» и «Барселона» получат награды от IFFHS – Футбол – Sports.ru
  53. ^ Shakhtar Squad | First Team | FC Shakhtar Donetsk official website
  54. ^ [
  55. ^ Офіційний сайт Федерації футболу України
  56. ^ Виталий СТАРУХИН – Футболфан
  57. ^ Михаил СОКОЛОВСКИЙ – Футболфан
  58. ^ Офіційний сайт Федерації футболу України
  59. ^ Игорь ПЕТРОВ – Футболфан
  60. ^ Офіційний сайт Федерації футболу України
  61. ^ Виктор ГРАЧЁВ – Футболфан
  62. ^ Офіційний сайт Федерації футболу України
  63. ^ Офіційний сайт Федерації футболу України
  64. ^ Ященко
  65. ^ Дегтерев
  66. ^ Офіційний сайт Федерації футболу України
  67. ^ Рудаков
  68. ^ Яремченко
  69. ^ Офіційний сайт Федерації футболу України
  70. ^ Qualified for championship

External links[edit]