FIBA Women's Basketball World Cup

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FIBA Women's Basketball World Cup
Current season, competition or edition:
2014 FIBA World Championship for Women
Sport Basketball
Founded 1953
No. of teams 16
Continent FIBA (International)
Most recent champion(s)  United States (9th title)
Most titles  United States (9 titles)

The FIBA Women's Basketball World Cup, formerly known as the FIBA World Championship for Women (also called the Basketball World Championship for Women), is a world basketball tournament for women's national teams held quadrennially. From 1986 through 2014, the Women's World Cup was held in the same year as the men's FIBA Basketball World Cup, though the two events were always held in different countries. After the 2014 editions of both championships, the men's World Cup was rescheduled on a new four-year cycle to avoid conflict with the FIFA World Cup, with the next men's championship to be held in 2019. The Women's World Cup will remain on the current four-year cycle, with editions held in the same years as the FIFA World Cup. Although the men's tournament changed its name from the "FIBA World Championship" after the 2010 edition, the women's tournament did not change its name at that time. The name change for the women's event occurred shortly after its 2014 edition.[1]

History[edit]

Like the men's event, the Women’s World Cup was created by the International Basketball Federation (FIBA). It began in 1953, three years after the first men's event, and was first held in Chile. For most of its early history, it was not held in the same year as the men's championship, and did not establish a consistent quadrennial cycle until 1967. After the 1983 event, FIBA changed the scheduling so that the women's tournament would be held in even-numbered non-Olympic years, a change that had come to the men's tournament in 1970.

The number of participating teams has remained at 16, unlike the men's event, which has been expanded to 24 and will expand further to 32 in 2019.[2]

Only four teams have won titles in the history of the Women's World Cup. The United States has won nine titles, including six of the last eight. The Soviet Union won six titles, including five in a row from 1959 to 1975. The only other countries to win have been Brazil in 1994 and Australia in 2006.

After the 2014 World Cup and World Championship for Women, the two tournaments will no longer be played in the same year. The Women's World Cup will remain on the current four-year cycle, with the final tournament played in the same year as the FIFA World Cup, while the (men's) World Cup will move to a new cycle in which the final tournament will be held the year after the Women's World Cup. Accordingly, only the FIBA Women's World Cup will be held in 2018, with the FIBA World Cup following in 2019.[2]

Results[edit]

Summaries[edit]

Year Host (final location) Gold medal game Bronze medal game Number of teams
Gold Score Silver Bronze Score Fourth place
1953
Details
 Chile (Santiago)
United States
49–36
Chile

France
49–37
Brazil
10
1957
Details
 Brazil (Rio de Janeiro)
United States
51–48
Soviet Union

Czechoslovakia
83–70
Brazil
12
1959
Details
 Soviet Union (Moscow)
Soviet Union
51–38
Bulgaria

Czechoslovakia
79–43
Yugoslavia
8
1964
Details
 Peru
Soviet Union
70–35
Czechoslovakia

Bulgaria
46–42
United States
13
1967
Details
 Czechoslovakia
Soviet Union
83–50
South Korea

Czechoslovakia
60–54
East Germany
11
1971
Details
 Brazil
Soviet Union
88–69
Czechoslovakia

Brazil
70–63
South Korea
13
1975
Details
 Colombia
Soviet Union
106–75
Japan

Czechoslovakia
55–45
Italy
13
1979
Details
 South Korea (Seoul)
United States
94–82
South Korea

Canada
66–57
Australia
12
1983
Details
 Brazil
Soviet Union
84–82
United States

China
71–63
South Korea
14
1986
Details
 Soviet Union
United States
108–88
Soviet Union

Canada
64–59
Czechoslovakia
12
1990
Details
 Malaysia
United States
88–78
Yugoslavia

Cuba
83–61
Czechoslovakia
16
1994
Details
 Australia
Brazil
96–87
China

United States
100–95
Australia
16
1998
Details
 Germany
United States
71–65
Russia

Australia
72–67
Brazil
16
2002
Details
 China
United States
79–74
Russia

Australia
91–63
South Korea
16
2006
Details
 Brazil
Australia
91–74
Russia

United States
99–59
Brazil
16
2010
Details
 Czech Republic
United States
89–69
Czech Republic

Spain
77–68
Belarus
16
2014
Details
 Turkey
United States
77–64
Spain

Australia
74–44
Turkey
16
2018
Details
 Spain 16

Note: From 1953 through 1979 the medalists were decided in a league format instead of in a knockout tournament; results of the final round matches are shown.

Medal table[edit]

Map of countries' best results
 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  United States 9 1 2 12
2  Soviet Union 6 2 0 8
3  Australia 1 0 3 4
4  Brazil 1 0 1 2
5  Russia 0 3 0 3
6  Czechoslovakia 0 2 4 6
7  South Korea 0 2 0 2
8  Bulgaria 0 1 1 2
 China 0 1 1 2
 Spain 0 1 1 2
11  Chile 0 1 0 1
 Japan 0 1 0 1
 Yugoslavia 0 1 0 1
 Czech Republic 0 1 0 1
15  Canada 0 0 2 2
16  France 0 0 1 1
 Cuba 0 0 1 1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Spain submits candidature to host 2018 FIBA Women's Basketball World Cup" (Press release). FIBA. 31 October 2014. Retrieved 5 November 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Mainini: calendar, system of competition and 3x3 our biggest priorities" (Press release). FIBA. 2012-04-20. Retrieved 2012-07-28. 

External links[edit]