FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1991

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Official logo for the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1991.

The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 1991 took place 7–17 February 1991 in Val di Fiemme, Italy. The women's 5 km was reintroduced after not being held in the previous championships. The men's 10 km was introduced in this championships. Additionally, this was the first championship with a unified German team for the first time officially since 1939 following separate East German and West German teams that had competed from 1958 to 1989.

Men's cross-country[edit]

10 km classical[edit]

11 February 1991

Medal Athlete Time
Gold  Terje Langli (NOR) 25:55.0
Silver  Christer Majbäck (SWE) 25:59.7
Bronze  Torgny Mogren (SWE) 26:01.5

15 km freestyle[edit]

9 February 1991

Medal Athlete Time
Gold  Bjørn Dæhlie (NOR) 36:57.2
Silver  Gunde Svan (SWE) 37:05.6
Bronze  Vladimir Smirnov (URS) 37:07.8

30 km classical[edit]

7 February 1991

Medal Athlete Time
Gold  Gunde Svan (SWE) 1:16:12.4
Silver  Vladimir Smirnov (URS) 1:16:17.3
Bronze  Vegard Ulvang (NOR) 1:16:32.8

50 km freestyle[edit]

17 February 1991

Medal Athlete Time
Gold  Torgny Mogren (SWE) 2:03:31.6
Silver  Gunde Svan (SWE) 2:03:48.8
Bronze  Maurilio De Zolt (ITA) 2:04:01.7

4 × 10 km relay[edit]

15 February 1991

Medal Team Time
Gold  Norway (Øyvind Skaanes, Terje Langli, Vegard Ulvang, Bjørn Dæhlie) 1:39:47.3
Silver  Sweden (Thomas Eriksson, Christer Majbäck, Gunde Svan, Torgny Mogren) 1:41:39.1
Bronze  Finland (Mika Kuusisto, Harri Kirvesniemi, Jari Isometsä, Jari Räsänen) 1:42:10.0

Women's cross-country[edit]

5 km classical[edit]

12 February 1991

Medal Athlete Time
Gold  Trude Dybendahl (NOR) 14:04.2
Silver  Marja-Liisa Kirvesniemi (FIN) 14:04.9
Bronze  Manuela Di Centa (ITA) 14:24.1

10 km freestyle[edit]

10 February 1991

Medal Athlete Time
Gold  Yelena Välbe (URS) 28:25.9
Silver  Marie-Helene Westin (SWE) 28:59.4
Bronze  Tamara Tikhonova (URS) 29:06.5

15 km classical[edit]

8 February 1991

Medal Athlete Time
Gold  Yelena Välbe (URS) 44:58.5
Silver  Trude Dybendahl (NOR) 46:02.4
Bronze  Stefania Belmondo (ITA) 46:31.4

30 km freestyle[edit]

16 February 1991

Medal Athlete Time
Gold  Lyubov Yegorova (URS) 1:20:26.8
Silver  Yelena Välbe (URS) 1:21:02.4
Bronze  Manuela Di Centa (ITA) 1:21:15.3

Yegorova was the last person to win a gold medal for the Soviet Union before its breakup later that year.

4 × 5 km relay[edit]

15 February 1991

Medal Team Time
Gold  Soviet Union (Lyubov Yegorova, Raisa Smetanina, Tamara Tikhonova, Yelena Välbe) 55:36.6
Silver  Italy (Bice Vanzetta, Manuela Di Centa, Gabriella Paruzzi, Stefania Belmondo) 56:22.5
Bronze  Norway (Solveig Pedersen, Inger Helene Nybråten, Elin Nilsen, Trude Dybendahl) 56:34.5

Men's Nordic combined[edit]

15 km individual Gundersen[edit]

7 February 1991

Medal Athlete Time
Gold  Fred Børre Lundberg (NOR)
Silver  Klaus Sulzenbacher (AUT)
Bronze  Klaus Ofner (AUT)

3 × 10 km team[edit]

13 February 1991

Medal Team Time
Gold  Austria (Günther Csar, Klaus Ofner, Klaus Sulzenbacher)
Silver  France (Francis Repellin, Xavier Girard, Fabrice Guy)
Bronze  Japan (Reiichi Mikata, Masashi Abe, Kazuoki Kodama)

Men's ski jumping[edit]

Individual normal hill[edit]

16 February 1991

Medal Athlete Points
Gold  Heinz Kuttin (AUT) 222.9
Silver  Kent Johanssen (NOR) 222.0
Bronze  Ari-Pekka Nikkola (FIN) 219.6

Individual large hill[edit]

10 February 1991

Medal Athlete Points Distance
Gold  Franci Petek (YUG) 217.5 115.5m 117.0m
Silver  Rune Olijnyk (NOR) 216.3 114.0m 118.0m
Bronze  Jens Weißflog (GER) 210.0 116.5m 113.5m

Petek became the last Yugoslavian to medal before the country's plunge into war later that year. Weissflog was the first German to win an individual medal following reunification of East Germany and West Germany and the first to medal since before World War II.

Team large hill[edit]

8 February 1991

Medal Team Points
Gold  Austria (Heinz Kuttin, Ernst Vettori, Stefan Horngacher, Andreas Felder) 567.6
Silver  Finland (Ari-Pekka Nikkola, Raimo Ylipulli, Vesa Hakala, Risto Laakkonen) 562.8
Bronze  Germany (Heiko Hunger, André Kiesewetter, Dieter Thoma, Jens Weißflog) 549.4

Medal table[edit]

Medal winners by nation.

  The host country is highlighted in lavender blue
 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Norway 5 3 2 10
2  Soviet Union 4 2 2 8
3  Austria 3 1 1 5
4  Sweden 2 5 1 8
5  Yugoslavia 1 0 0 1
6  Finland 0 2 2 4
7  Italy 0 1 4 5
8  France 0 1 0 1
9  Germany 0 0 2 2
10  Japan 0 0 1 1
Total 15 15 15 45

References[edit]

External links[edit]