Fabriciano González

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Fabri
Personal information
Full name Fabriciano González Penelas
Date of birth (1955-04-25) 25 April 1955 (age 59)
Place of birth San Pedro, Spain
Playing position Winger
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
?–? Lugo
?–? Viveiro
?–? Villalbés
Teams managed
?–? SG Comercial
?–? Villalbés
1986–1988 Lugo
1988–1989 Villarrobledo
1989–1990 Sporting Mahonés
1990–1991 Gandía
1991–1992 Manlleu
1992 Mérida
1993–1994 Mérida
1994 Logroñés
1996 Elche
1997 Gimnàstic
1998 Murcia
1999–2000 Lugo
2000–2001 Ovarense
2001–2002 Campomaiorense
2003 Marco
2003 Avilés
2003–2004 Zamora
2004 Huesca
2005 Almería
2005–2006 Burgos
2007 Alavés
2007–2008 Mérida
2008–2009 Cartagena
2010–2012 Granada
2012 Huesca
2012 Racing Santander
2013 Panathinaikos
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).
This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is González and the second or maternal family name is Penelas.

Fabriciano González Penelas, commonly known as Fabri (born 25 April 1955 in San Pedro de Santa Comba, Lugo, Galicia), is a Spanish football manager of national reputation.

Playing career[edit]

Fabri played as a right winger, and his career was spent exclusively in the lower leagues of his country and his native Galicia: he represented Club Deportivo Lugo, Viveiro CF and Racing Club Villalbés.

Coaching career[edit]

Fabri started coaching in the mid-80's, his beginnings also being in amateur football. From ages 37–39 he worked with CP Mérida in Segunda División and, in the 1994–95 season, was one of five managers for CD Logroñés as the team suffered La Liga relegation with an all-time low 13 points: he was in charge of the La Rioja club for only three games, and did not look back on the experience with pleasure later.[1]

In the following years Fabri worked in Segunda División B and lower, also returning to Lugo for a second spell as a manager. He also coached three teams in Portugal, all in the second level.

Fabri only returned to his country's division two in the 2004–05 campaign, working with UD Almería which he helped lead to the 14th position after registering one win, two draws and four losses in his seven games in charge. He met the same fate in his following experience in the category, with Deportivo Alavés in 2006–07.

In 2008–09 Fabri achieved promotion to the second division with FC Cartagena, even though he did not finish the season after being fired in February 2009.[2] On 22 March 2010 he was appointed at Granada CF also in the third level,[3] helping the Andalusians win their group and finish as overall champions, with the subsequent promotion.[4]

After renewing his contract with Granada, Fabri led the club to a second consecutive promotion, finishing fifth in the regular season and eliminating Celta de Vigo and Elche CF in the play-offs. On 28 June 2011 he once again renewed his link to the Nazarí, for one year.[5]

Fabri was fired on 22 January 2012 following a 0–3 away loss at RCD Espanyol, even though Granada were still out of the relegation zone.[6] He started 2012–13 at the helm of Racing de Santander in division two, being fired after less than four months in charge.

On 8 January 2013, Fabri was appointed at Panathinaikos F.C. in Greece.[7] He was relieved of his duties on 31 March.[8]

Other activities[edit]

Apart from his football career, Fabri worked as a teacher on several occasions, collaborating with the Castile-La Mancha School of Coaching in 1989, and teaching tactics and skills in the Balearic Islands School of Coaching the following year.

Additionally, he served as main teacher at the Galicia School of Coaching, in the field of tactics.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "El equipo se encontraba muerto, pero el presidente me dijo que estuviera tranquilo" [The team was dead, but the president told me to be quiet] (in Spanish). Ideal. 6 June 2010. Retrieved 21 October 2011. 
  2. ^ "El Cartagena despide a Fabri y contrata a Paco Jémez" [Cartagena fires Fabri and hires Paco Jémez] (in Spanish). La Verdad. 3 February 2009. Retrieved 27 February 2014. 
  3. ^ "Fabri: "Entrenar al Granada es una gran oportunidad"" [Fabri: "To coach Granada is a great opportunity"] (in Spanish). Ideal. 22 March 2010. Retrieved 23 October 2011. 
  4. ^ "La afición se echó a la calle al grito de "¡Fabri, Fabri, Fabri!"" [Fans took the street shouting "Fabri, Fabri, Fabri!"] (in Spanish). Diario AS. 25 May 2010. Retrieved 23 October 2011. 
  5. ^ "Fabri renueva por una temporada" [Fabri renews for one season] (in Spanish). Granada's official website. 28 June 2011. Retrieved 23 October 2011. 
  6. ^ "Abel Resino se convierte en nuevo técnico del Granada" [Abel Resino becomes new Granada coach] (in Spanish). Marca. 22 January 2012. Retrieved 23 January 2012. 
  7. ^ "Panathinaikos appoint Fabri as new coach". Yahoo! Sports. 8 January 2013. Retrieved 20 January 2013. 
  8. ^ "Panathinaikos cut ties with coach Fabri". UEFA.com. 31 March 2013. Retrieved 1 April 2013. 

External links[edit]