Faculty of Computer Science, Dalhousie University

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Coordinates: 44°38′17″N 63°35′13″W / 44.63806°N 63.58694°W / 44.63806; -63.58694

Faculty of Computer Science, Dalhousie University
Established 1997
Type Faculty
Academic staff 35 faculty members, 17 staff members
Undergraduates 1000
Postgraduates < 300
Location Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Former names School of Computer Science, Technical University of Nova Scotia (? - 1997)
Computer Science Division, Department of Mathematics, Statistics & Computer Science, Dalhousie University (? - 1997)
Affiliations Dalhousie University
Website Dalhousie Computer Science Website

The Faculty of Computer Science is a faculty of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. It is also home to the Canadian Institute of Big Data Analytics.

History[edit]

The Faculty of Computer Science was officially founded on 1 April 1997 with the merger of the Technical University of Nova Scotia (TUNS) into Dalhousie University.

The Faculty of Computer Science traces its history to the School of Computer Science at TUNS and the Computer Science Division of the Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science at Dalhousie University.

Upon its founding, the Faculty of Computer Science took residence on the 15th and 16th floors of the Maritime Centre until the new Computer Science Building was completed in the fall of 1999. The new building was designed by Brian MacKay-Lyons and was featured in Canadian Architect in March 2000. It was renamed "Goldberg Computer Science Building" in June 2008 in recognition of a donation by Seymour Schulich and his wife, Tanna Goldberg-Schulich.[1]

Programs[edit]

The Goldberg School of Computer Science offers several diverse undergraduate programs including:

In general, the philosophy of the undergraduate program is to build a solid foundation of mathematics and computer science during the first three years of the program, allowing students more flexibility in fourth year.

The school offers a number of graduate level programs spanning fields such as bioinformatics, computational neuroscience, and machine learning.

Notable People[edit]

  • Erik Demaine, Graduated 1999, Became the Youngest Professor at MIT at the age of 20

References[edit]

  1. ^ Comeau, Billy (24 June 2008). "A family affair". Dal News. Retrieved 14 March 2014. 

External links[edit]