Fair Haven, New Jersey

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Fair Haven, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Fair Haven
Map of Fair Haven in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Fair Haven in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Fair Haven, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Fair Haven, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°21′43″N 74°02′20″W / 40.36194°N 74.038775°W / 40.36194; -74.038775Coordinates: 40°21′43″N 74°02′20″W / 40.36194°N 74.038775°W / 40.36194; -74.038775[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated April 23, 1912
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Benjamin J. Lucarelli (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Theresa S. Casagrande[4]
 • Clerk Allyson Cinquegrana[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 2.112 sq mi (5.470 km2)
 • Land 1.597 sq mi (4.137 km2)
 • Water 0.515 sq mi (1.334 km2)  24.38%
Area rank 402nd of 566 in state
29th of 53 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 20 ft (6 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 6,121
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 6,081
 • Rank 340th of 566 in state
27th of 53 in county[12]
 • Density 3,832.5/sq mi (1,479.7/km2)
 • Density rank 161st of 566 in state
16th of 53 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07704[13][14]
Area code(s) 732[15]
FIPS code 3402522440[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885213[1][18]
Website www.fairhavennj.org

Fair Haven is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, along the Navesink River. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,121,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 184 (+3.1%) from the 5,937 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 667 (+12.7%) from the 5,270 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Fair Haven was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 28, 1912, from portions of Shrewsbury Township, subject to the results of a referendum held on April 23, 1912. Portions of the borough were exchanged with Red Bank on June 17, 1957.[20][21]

Geography[edit]

Fair Haven is located at 40°21′43″N 74°02′20″W / 40.36194°N 74.038775°W / 40.36194; -74.038775 (40.36194,-74.038775). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.112 square miles (5.470 km2), of which, 1.597 square miles (4.137 km2) of it was land and 0.515 square miles (1.334 km2) of it (24.38%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 1,295
1930 2,260 74.5%
1940 2,491 10.2%
1950 3,560 42.9%
1960 5,678 59.5%
1970 6,142 8.2%
1980 5,679 −7.5%
1990 5,270 −7.2%
2000 5,937 12.7%
2010 6,121 3.1%
Est. 2013 6,081 [11] −0.7%
Population sources: 1920[22] 1920-1930[23]
1930-1990[24] 2000[25][26] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 6,121 people, 1,970 households, and 1,659 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,832.5 per square mile (1,479.7/km2). There were 2,065 housing units at an average density of 1,292.9 per square mile (499.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.63% (5,792) White, 2.50% (153) Black or African American, 0.10% (6) Native American, 1.08% (66) Asian, 0.10% (6) Pacific Islander, 0.44% (27) from other races, and 1.16% (71) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.70% (165) of the population.[8]

There were 1,970 households, of which 51.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.6% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 15.8% were non-families. 13.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.11 and the average family size was 3.45.[8]

In the borough, 34.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 20.5% from 25 to 44, 30.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.3 years. For every 100 females there were 96.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $112,308 (with a margin of error of +/- $18,209) and the median family income was $113,546 (+/- $18,045). Males had a median income of $109,643 (+/- $28,479) versus $62,083 (+/- $15,309) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $54,241 (+/- $6,162). About 0.9% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.[27]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 5,937 people, 1,998 households, and 1,658 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,559.3 people per square mile (1,372.6/km2). There were 2,037 housing units at an average density of 1,221.2 per square mile (471.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.87% White, 4.09% African American, 0.03% Native American, 0.98% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 0.81% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.33% of the population.[25][26]

There were 1,998 households out of which 47.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.1% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.0% were non-families. 15.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.97 and the average family size was 3.33.[25][26]

In the borough the population was spread out with 33.0% under the age of 18, 4.0% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.9 males.[25][26]

The median income for a household in the borough was $97,220, and the median income for a family was $109,760. Males had a median income of $83,657 versus $51,389 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $44,018. About 1.6% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.[25][26]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Fair Haven is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Fair Haven, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[28][29]

As of 2013, the Mayor of the Borough of Fair Haven is Republican Benjamin Lucarelli, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2014.[30] Lucarelli was chosen in February 2012 to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mike Halfacre, and who left office to take a position in the New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control,[31][32] with Eric R. Jaeger in turn chosen in March 2012 to fill Lucarelli's vanacy on thee Borough Council.[33] Members of the Fair Haven Borough Council are Council President Jonathan Peters (R, 2013; Finance and Environmental Commission), Eric R. Jaeger (R, 2015; Fire and First Aid), Jerome A. Koch (R, 2014; Public Works and Fair Haven Fields Natural Area), Robert A. Marchese (R, 2015; Planning and Zoning), Susan A. Sorensen (R, 2014; Parks and Recreation) and Rowland Wilhelm (R, 2013; Police Department).[34][35][36][37]

Fair Haven is a participating municipality in an initiative to study regionalization of their municipal police force with one or more municipalities. The borough received a grant from the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs in the amount of $40,950 along with the Boroughs of Rumson, Little Silver, Oceanport and Shrewsbury to hire professional consultants to conduct the study on their behalf. A report is due before the end of 2007. On or about July 1, 2009, Fair Haven will close and move their Police, Fire and EMS dispatching over to Little Silver. After deadlines to begin this operation were missed, dispatching of police and emergency services will be handled by the Monmouth County Sheriff's office by October 1, 2009.[38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Fair Haven is located in the 4th Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 13th state legislative district.[9][40][41] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Fair Haven had been in the 12th state legislative district.[42] Prior to the 2010 Census, Fair Haven had been part of the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[42]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[46][47]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 13th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph M. Kyrillos (R, Middletown Township) and in the General Assembly by Amy Handlin (R, Middletown Township) and Declan O'Scanlon (R, Little Silver).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[51] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[52] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[53] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[54] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[55] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[56][57] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[58] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[59] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[60]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,201 registered voters in Fair Haven, of which 1,049 (25.0%) were registered as Democrats, 1,286 (30.6%) were registered as Republicans and 1,865 (44.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[61]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 50.5% of the vote here (1,765 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 47.6% (1,664 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (33 votes), among the 3,498 ballots cast by the borough's 4,343 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.5%.[62] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 51.8% of the vote here (1,765 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 47.1% (1,604 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (27 votes), among the 3,407 ballots cast by the borough's 4,184 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 81.4.[63]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 58.8% of the vote here (1,459 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 32.9% (817 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.2% (178 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (14 votes), among the 2,480 ballots cast by the borough's 4,238 registered voters, yielding a 58.5% turnout.[64]

Education[edit]

The Fair Haven Public Schools serves students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[65]) are Viola L. Sickles School[66] (PreK-3; 457 students) and Knollwood School[67] (grades 4-8; 557 students).[68]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School, together with students from Rumson.[69] As of the 2010-11 school year, the Rumson-based high school had an enrollment of 997 students.[70]

History[edit]

Fair Haven's first permanent settlement dates to a structure built in 1816 at the Navesink River near today's Fair Haven Road. By the mid-19th century, steamboats stopped at "Chandler's Dock" on a route between Red Bank and New York City, bringing visitors to the area and local oysters to the city.[71] Fisk Chapel was built in the late 19th century to accommodate the African American population.

Fair Haven has an annual Fireman's Fair during the last weekend of summer including Labor Day weekend which attracts a couple of thousand people, including noted musicians Bruce Springsteen and Bon Jovi. The Fair Haven Fireman's Fair also has a Fireman's night and invites all firefighters from any other firehouse to come and join in the festivities.[72] The Fireman's Fair used to raffle off a car each year, but most attendees already had their own cars and the decision was made in the 1990s to switch to a 50/50 raffle whose prize can be in the tens of thousands of dollars.[73] The fair is on the Fire Company grounds.

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 23.95 miles (38.54 km) of roadways, of which 21.40 miles (34.44 km) were maintained by the municipality and 2.55 miles (4.10 km) by Monmouth County.[74]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides local service on the 835 route. The nearest train station is at Red Bank, where service is available on the North Jersey Coast Line.[75]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Fair Haven include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Administrator, Borough of Fair Haven. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk, Borough of Fair Haven. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 63.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Fair Haven, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Fair Haven borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 26, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Fair Haven borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 26, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Fair Haven, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 26, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Fair Haven, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 179. Accessed March 26, 2012.
  21. ^ History, Fair Haven, New Jersey. Accessed March 26, 2012.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  23. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed March 26, 2012.
  24. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed March 26, 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Fair Haven borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Fair Haven borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  27. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Fair haven borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 26, 2012.
  28. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  29. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed December 1, 2014.
  30. ^ Mayor Benjamin Lucarelli, Fair Haven, New Jersey. Accessed March 26, 2012.
  31. ^ Hosseini, Zach. Michael I. Halfacre Named Director of New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control, New Jersey Attorney General, February 10, 2012. Accessed March 26, 2012. "Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa announced the appointment of Michael I. Halfacre as Director of the New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC)."
  32. ^ Higgs, Larry. "Fair Haven Council Selects New Mayor", Fair Haven, New Jersey, February 21, 2012. Accessed March 26, 2012. "The Borough Council elected Benjamin Lucarelli Monday night from three nominees submitted by the local Republican committee to replace Michael Halfacre as mayor.... The Republican municipal committee had submitted the names of three mayoral candidates to the council — Peters, Lucarelli and Andrew Troccha, a former GOP committee chairman — to replace Halfacre, who resigned on Jan. 26 after he was nominated to head the state Division of Alcohol Beverages by Gov. Chris Christie."
  33. ^ Bitterly, Alison. "Eric Jaeger Fills FH Councilman Slot", Two River Times, March 26, 2012. Accessed March 26, 2012. "During a regular meeting of the governing body March 12, Eric Jaeger was sworn in as the borough's newest council member.... He will be filling the seat recently vacated by now-Mayor Benjamin Lucarelli."
  34. ^ Government, Fair Haven, New Jersey. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  35. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 6, 2012, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  36. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 8, 2011, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  37. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 2, 2010, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  38. ^ Monmouth County to Dispatch Fair Haven Police, Borough of Fair Haven. Accessed October 20, 2009.
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  47. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  49. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  56. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  57. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  58. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  59. ^ Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  60. ^ Monmouth County Surrogate, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  61. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  62. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  63. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  64. ^ 2009 Governor: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  65. ^ School Data for the Fair Haven Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  66. ^ Viola L. Sickles School, Fair Haven Public Schools. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  67. ^ Knollwood School, Fair Haven Public Schools. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  68. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Fair Haven Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 11, 2013.
  69. ^ Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 11, 2013. "The boroughs of Rumson and Fair Haven are residential communities zoned principally for single family dwellings. These adjacent communities are located in Northern Monmouth County, within forty miles of New York City and within a mile of the Atlantic Ocean."
  70. ^ District information for the Rumson-Fair Haven Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  71. ^ History, Borough of Fair Haven. Accessed December 2, 2007.
  72. ^ Capuzzo, Jill P. "Living In: Fair Haven, N.J.", The New York Times, August 13, 2010. Accessed March 26, 2012. "Another much-anticipated annual event, the Fair Haven volunteer fire company's Firemen's Fair, is scheduled for the end of the month. It draws tens of thousands of people to this 1.7-square-mile town on the Navesink River just a couple of miles in from the ocean."
  73. ^ 2011 Firemen's Fair Friday, Aug. 26 to Sept. 3rd (closed on Sunday's), Borough of Fair Haven. Accessed March 26, 2012. "But, like all other changes, automobiles became less attractive to families who increasingly owned multiple vehicles, including top-of-the line SUVs. So, the Fair Company discontinued the automobile raffle in the late 1990's and replaced the event with a 'Super 50-50'" event in which the winner walks away with 10s of thousands of dollars -- free to spend on a car or anything else of interest."
  74. ^ Monmouth County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  75. ^ Monmouth County Bus / Rail connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed August 5, 2012.
  76. ^ La Gorce, Tammy. "New Faces NJ: Jacquelyn Jablonski - Fair Haven teen living her dream as a high-fashion model.", New Jersey Monthly, December 16, 2009. Accessed May 22, 2011. "It's likely that few members of the class of 2009 have enjoyed the instant success of Jacqueline Jablonski. The 18-year-old from Fair Haven was just four months out of Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School and there she was, strutting the stuff of Herve Leger, Marc Jacobs, and other top fashion designers as a model during New York Fashion Week."
  77. ^ Staff. "London Olympics: Connor Jaeger, Fair Haven native, finishes sixth in 1,500 freestyle final", The Star-Ledger, August 4, 2012. Accessed August 7, 2012. "In the final, individual swimming event at the Aquatics Centre in London, Fair Haven native Connor Jaeger finished sixth in the final of the 1,500m free with a time of 14:52.99."
  78. ^ Anderson, Dave. "Sports of The Times; Confronting Some Haunting History on Lombardi Avenue", The New York Times, September 17, 1995. Accessed March 26, 2012. "Another factor was that Lombardi's wife, Marie, wanted to return to her New Jersey Shore roots. The Lombardis had lived in Fair Haven, N.J., near Red Bank, before moving to Green Bay."
  79. ^ Kamin, Arthur Z. "State Becomes a Part of Celebrating Marconi's Achievements", The New York Times, October 23, 1994. Accessed March 26, 2012. "In 1987, the award was presented in Washington to Dr. Robert W. Lucky of Fair Haven, now the vice president for applied research with Bellcore, the Bell Communications research arm in Lincroft."
  80. ^ Staff. "BRUCE MAPES SR., DIES; Former Professional Skater With 'Ice Follies' Was 59", The New York Times, February 20, 1961. Accessed March 12, 2011
  81. ^ Staff. "In the Arts", Atlanticville, February 15, 2007. Accessed March 26, 2012. "Fair Haven singer/songwriter John Padovano, 'The Ironbound Crooner,' will perform Friday at 8 p.m. at Cafe 360, 34 E. Main St., Freehold."

External links[edit]