Fairfield Township, Essex County, New Jersey

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This article is about a township in Essex County. The other Fairfield in New Jersey is Fairfield Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey.
Fairfield Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Fairfield
Map of Fairfield Township in Essex County. Inset: Location of Essex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Fairfield Township in Essex County. Inset: Location of Essex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Fairfield Township, Essex County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Fairfield Township, Essex County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°52′57″N 74°18′17″W / 40.882508°N 74.304594°W / 40.882508; -74.304594Coordinates: 40°52′57″N 74°18′17″W / 40.882508°N 74.304594°W / 40.882508; -74.304594[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Essex
Incorporated February 16, 1798 (as Caldwell Township)
Renamed November 6, 1963 (as Fairfield Township)
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor James Gasparini (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Joseph Catenaro[4]
 • Clerk Denise Cafone[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 10.460 sq mi (27.093 km2)
 • Land 10.296 sq mi (26.667 km2)
 • Water 0.164 sq mi (0.426 km2)  1.57%
Area rank 206th of 566 in state
4th of 22 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 174 ft (53 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10][11]
 • Total 7,466
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 7,497
 • Rank 307th of 566 in state
19th of 22 in county[13]
 • Density 725.1/sq mi (280.0/km2)
 • Density rank 411th of 566 in state
22nd of 22 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07004[14][15]
Area code(s) 973[16]
FIPS code 3401322385[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 1729722[19][2]
Website www.fairfieldnj.org

Fairfield is a township in far northwestern Essex County, New Jersey, in the United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 7,466,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 403 (+5.7%) from the 7,063 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 552 (-7.2%) from the 7,615 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] Fairfield is the least densely populated town in Essex County.[13]

The first Europeans to settle in the area were Dutch and the place was called Gansegat. Later it was part of Horse Neck and officially part of Newark Township. What is now Fairfield was formed on February 16, 1798, as Caldwell Township from portions of Acquackanonk Township and Newark Township. The area was named for Rev. James Caldwell. It was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken to create Livingston (February 8, 1813), Fairmount Township (March 11, 1862, now part of West Orange), Caldwell borough (February 10, 1892), Verona Township (February 17, 1892, now known and including what is now Cedar Grove), North Caldwell (March 31, 1898), Essex Fells (March 31, 1902) and West Caldwell (February 24, 1904). On November 6, 1963, Caldwell Township was renamed as Fairfield Township, based on the results of a referendum passed the previous day. Fairfield was reincorporated as borough on June 8, 1964.[21] In 1979, Fairfield again became a township to take advantage of federal revenue sharing policies.[22]

Essex County Airport, managed by the Essex County Improvement Authority is located in Fairfield.[23]

Geography[edit]

Fairfield Township is located at 40°52′57″N 74°18′17″W / 40.882508°N 74.304594°W / 40.882508; -74.304594 (40.882508,-74.304594). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 10.460 square miles (27.093 km2), of which, 10.296 square miles (26.667 km2) of it is land and 0.164 square miles (0.426 km2) of it (1.57%) is water.[1][2] Fairfield is the least dense municipality in Essex County.[13]

Great Piece Meadows is a swamp covering 1,170 acres (470 ha).[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 2,235
1820 2,020 * −9.6%
1830 2,004 −0.8%
1840 2,184 9.0%
1850 2,377 8.8%
1860 2,688 13.1%
1870 2,727 * 1.5%
1880 3,167 16.1%
1890 3,638 14.9%
1900 1,619 * −55.5%
1910 704 * −56.5%
1920 717 1.8%
1930 989 37.9%
1940 1,392 40.7%
1950 1,906 36.9%
1960 3,310 73.7%
1970 6,884 108.0%
1980 7,987 16.0%
1990 7,615 −4.7%
2000 7,063 −7.2%
2010 7,466 5.7%
Est. 2012 7,497 [12] 0.4%
Population sources:
1800-1920[25] 1840[26] 1850-1870[27]
1850[28] 1870[29] 1880-1890[30]
1890-1910[31] 1910-1930[32]
1930-1990[33] 2000[34][35] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[21]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,466 people, 2,645 households, and 2,103 families residing in the township. The population density was 725.1 per square mile (280.0 /km2). There were 2,723 housing units at an average density of 264.5 per square mile (102.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.84% (7,081) White, 0.68% (51) Black or African American, 0.28% (21) Native American, 2.53% (189) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.74% (55) from other races, and 0.92% (69) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.14% (384) of the population.[9]

There were 2,645 households of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.0% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.5% were non-families. 18.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.22.[9]

In the township, 22.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 21.4% from 25 to 44, 28.6% from 45 to 64, and 20.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.5 years. For every 100 females there were 94.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.8 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $97,361 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,797) and the median family income was $117,004 (+/- $7,881). Males had a median income of $69,081 (+/- $15,627) versus $51,198 (+/- $6,668) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $41,615 (+/- $5,217). About 0.5% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.[36]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 7,063 people, 2,296 households, and 1,981 families residing in the township. The population density was 675.8 people per square mile (261.0/km2). There were 2,326 housing units at an average density of 222.5 per square mile (85.9/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 95.63% White, 0.52% African American, 0.10% Native American, 2.82% Asian, 0.40% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.45% of the population.[34][35]

There were 2,296 households out of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.7% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 13.7% were non-families. 10.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.04 and the average family size was 3.29.[34][35]

In the township the population was spread out with 22.0% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 15.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 95.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.3 males.[34][35]

The median income for a household in the township was $83,120, and the median income for a family was $90,998. Males had a median income of $56,106 versus $39,032 for females. The per capita income for the township was $32,099. About 2.3% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.2% of those under age 18 and 2.2% of those age 65 or over.[34][35]

Government[edit]

Fairfield Township operates within the Faulkner Act under the Small Municipality plan C form of New Jersey government, as implemented as of January 1, 1962, based on direct petition.[37] The Mayor exercises executive power of the municipality, appoints department heads with Council approval, prepares the annual budget and has veto over ordinances subject to override by 2/3 of all members of Council. The Council exercises legislative power of municipality and approves appointment of department heads.[6][38]

As of 2013, members of the Fairfield Township Council are Mayor James Gasparini, Council President Michael McGlynn, Joseph Cifelli, John LaForgia and Thomas Morgan.[38][39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Fairfield is located in the 11th Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 26th state legislative district.[10][41][42] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Fairfield had been in the 27th state legislative district.[43]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[44] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[45][46] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[47][48]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 26th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Pennacchio (R, Montville) and in the General Assembly by BettyLou DeCroce (R, Parsippany-Troy Hills) and Jay Webber (R, Morris Plains) and [49][50] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[51] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[52]

Essex County is governed by a directly-elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by the Board of Chosen Freeholders.[53] As of 2013, the County Executive is Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr.[54] The county's Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, four elected on an at-large basis and one from each of five wards, who serve three-year terms of office on a concurrent basis, all of which end in 2014.[53][55][56] Essex County's Freeholders are Freeholder President Blonnie R. Watson (at large; Newark)[57], Freeholder Vice President Patricia Sebold (at large; Livingston)[58], Rufus I. Johnson (at large; Newark)[59], Gerald M. Owens (At large; South Orange, filling the vacant seat after the resignation of Donald Payne, Jr.)[60] Rolando Bobadilla (District 1 - Newark's North and East Wards, parts of Central and West Wards; Newark)[61], D. Bilal Beasley (District 2 - Irvington, Maplewood and Newark's South Ward and parts of West Ward; Irvington)[62], Carol Y. Clark (District 3 - East Orange, Newark's West and Central Wards, Orange and South Orange; East Orange)[63] and Leonard M. Luciano (District 4 - Caldwell, Cedar Grove, Essex Fells, Fairfield, Livingston, Millburn, North Caldwell, Roseland, Verona, West Caldwell and West Orange; West Caldwell),[64] and Brendan W. Gill (District 5 - Belleville, Bloomfield, Glen Ridge, Montclair and Nutley; Montclair).[65][66][67] Constitutional elected countywide are County Clerk Christopher J. Durkin (West Caldwell, 2015),[68] Sheriff Armando B. Fontoura (2015)[69] and Surrogate Thomas N. Stephen, II (2016).[70][55][71]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,378 registered voters in Fairfield, of which 1,004 (18.7%) were registered as Democrats, 2,072 (38.5%) were registered as Republicans and 2,299 (42.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[72]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 70.1% of the vote here (2,797 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 28.5% (1,137 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (21 votes), among the 3,991 ballots cast by the township's 5,380 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.2%.[73] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 69.6% of the vote here (2,742 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 29.2% (1,151 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (39 votes), among the 3,939 ballots cast by the township's 5,131 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.8.[74]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.9% of the vote here (1,819 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 25.0% (661 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.0% (133 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (12 votes), among the 2,641 ballots cast by the township's 5,397 registered voters, yielding a 48.9% turnout.[75]

Education[edit]

The Fairfield School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through sixth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[76]) are Adlai E. Stevenson Elementary School[77] for pre-kindergarten through third grade (395 students) and Winston Churchill School[78] for students in fourth through sixth grade (297).[79][80]

Students in public school for seventh through twelfth grades attend the West Essex Regional School District, a regional school district in western Essex County serving students from Essex Fells, Fairfield, North Caldwell and Roseland.[81][82] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[83]) are West Essex Regional Middle School[84] (grades 7-8; 564 students) and West Essex High School[85] (grades 9-12; 1,025 students).[86]

StenoTech Career Institute is a technical school in Fairfield, established in 1988, that offers court reporting and medical transcription training.[87]

History[edit]

The Dutch initially settled the area near the bottomlands of the Passaic River in 1669 after purchasing it from the Native Americans naming it Gansegat which is Dutch for duck's pond.[88]

Fairfield was part of the Horseneck Tract, which was an area that consisted of what are now the municipalities of Caldwell, West Caldwell, North Caldwell, Fairfield, Verona, Cedar Grove, Essex Fells, Roseland, and portions of Livingston and West Orange. In 1702, settlers purchased the 14,000 acres (57 km2) Horseneck Tract — the reason for this name has never been determined, but historians agree that it is not because of its shape — from the Lenape Native Americans for goods equal to $325. This purchase encompassed much of western Essex County, from the First Mountain to the Passaic River.

The Van Ness House, constructed in 1720, is a historic home added in 1977 to the National Register of Historic Places.[89] The Fairfield Dutch Reformed Church dates back to 1720, and its current structure is another historic site, built in 1804.[90]

Transportation[edit]

U.S. Route 46, Route 159 and Interstate 80 all pass through the Township.

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to Newark on the 29 and 71 routes.[91]

Corporate residents[edit]

  • Pharmaceutical firm Bradley Pharmaceuticals was headquartered here until the company was acquired by Nycomed in 2008.[92]
  • Cricket Hill, microbrewer of American Ale, Hopnotic IPA, and East Coast Lager.[93]
  • Critical Links, a provider of networking and communications equipment for use in the small and medium enterprises.[94]
  • Telebrands, the direct marketing firm best known for its "As Seen on TV" products.[95]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Fairfield include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 19, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Administration, Fairfield Township. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk / Registrar, Fairfield Township. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 125.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Fairfield, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ "2010 Census Populations: Essex County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed November 5, 2012
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Fairfield township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Fairfield township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b c d GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Fairfield, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Fairfield, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 126. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  22. ^ New Jersey State Commission on County and Municipal Government, Modern Forms of Municipal Government, 1992, Chapter VI: Municipal Names and Municipal Classification
  23. ^ Home page, Essex County Airport. Accessed November 5, 2012. "The Essex County Airport also known as 'Caldwell Airport' is conveniently located in Fairfield, NJ. Just Thirty Minutes from Manhattan via the Lincoln Tunnel or George Washington Bridge."
  24. ^ Great Piece Meadows , Wildlife Preserves. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  26. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 10, 2013. Population of 2,183 is listed for Caldwell Township, in conflict with 2,184 shown in table.
  27. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 241, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 10, 2013. "Caldwell was formed from Newark and Acquackannonck in 1798. It is about seven miles long by four wide. On its north is Little Falls and Wayne, in Passaic county, and Pequannock in Morris county, Montclair on the east, West Orange and Livingston on the south, and Hanover and Montville, Morris county, on the west. In the eastern part are the First and Second mountains, and the remainder of the township abounds in hills. The population in 1850 was 2,377; in 1860, 2,688; and in 1870, 2,727."
  28. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 138. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  29. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  30. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  31. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed November 5, 2012. Listed as Caldwell Township.
  32. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 5, 2012. Listed as Caldwell Township.
  33. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  34. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Fairfield township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  35. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Fairfield township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  36. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Fairfield township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  37. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  38. ^ a b Fairfield Township Mayor and Council, Township of Fairfield. Accessed October 10, 2013. "Fairfield Township is a Mayor - Council form of government under the New Jersey Faulkner Act (Small Municipality Plan “C”)."
  39. ^ Galante, Steven, Jr. "West Essex towns reorganize; mayors, members of council are sworn in", The Progress, January 7, 2011. Accessed April 24, 2011. "Councilman Thomas Morgan was unanimously appointed to council president, succeeding John LaForgia. Both are Republicans."
  40. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  45. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  46. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  47. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  48. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  49. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  50. ^ District 26 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  51. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  52. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  53. ^ a b General Information, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013. "The Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, five of whom are elected from districts and four of whom are elected at-large. They are elected for three-year concurrent terms and may be re-elected to successive terms at the annual election in November."
  54. ^ Essex County Executive, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ a b Essex County Elected Officials, Essex County Clerk, as of February 2012. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Definition of a Freeholder, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ Blonnie R. Watson, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  58. ^ Patricia Sebold, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  59. ^ Rufus I. Johnson, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  60. ^ Lee, Eunice. "Labor leader from South Orange tapped as new Essex County freeholder", The Star-Ledger, December 19, 2012. Accessed January 9, 2013. "A longtime labor union leader from South Orange was sworn in this afternoon as the newest Essex County freeholder.Gerald Owens, 74, is a general organizer for the International Longshoremen's Association.... Owens is filling the seat vacated by former at-large freeholder Donald Payne Jr., who stepped down from the post last month after securing the 10th Congressional District seat left open by his late father."
  61. ^ Rolando Bobadilla, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  62. ^ D. Bilal Beasley, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  63. ^ Carol Y. Clark, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  64. ^ Leonard M. Luciano, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  65. ^ Brendan W. Gill, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  66. ^ The Board of Chosen Freeholders, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  67. ^ Breakdown of Freeholder Districts, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  68. ^ About Christopher J. Durkin, Essex County Clerk. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  69. ^ Armando B. Fontoura - Essex County Sheriff, Essex County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  70. ^ Office of Surrogate, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  71. ^ County Directory, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  72. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Essex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  73. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Essex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  74. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Essex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  75. ^ 2009 Governor: Essex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  76. ^ Data for the Fairfield School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  77. ^ Adlai E. Stevenson Elementary School, Fairfield School District. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  78. ^ Winston Churchill School, Fairfield School District. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  79. ^ Schools, Fairfield School District. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  80. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Fairfield School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  81. ^ West Essex Regional High School 2013 School Report Card, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 10, 2013. "West Essex Regional High School is located in North Caldwell and serves the four area sending districts of Essex Fells, Fairfield, North Caldwell, and Roseland."
  82. ^ Home page, West Essex Regional School District, backed up by the Internet Archive as of December 24, 2011. Accessed October 10, 2013. "The West Essex Regional School District is proud to celebrate 50 years of providing excellent educational opportunities for the students of Fairfield, Essex Fells, North Caldwell and Roseland. West Essex will be coordinating efforts to celebrate this golden anniversary as we move through 2011."
  83. ^ School Data for the West Essex Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  84. ^ West Essex Regional Middle School, West Essex Regional School District. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  85. ^ West Essex Regional High School, West Essex Regional School District. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  86. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the West Essex Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  87. ^ About Us, StenoTech Career Institute. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  88. ^ Poekel Jr., Charles A. West Essex: Essex Fells, Fairfield, North Caldwell and Roseland, Arcadia Publishing, 1999, 2004
  89. ^ Van Ness, Peter, Farmhouse, Fairfield Rd., FAIRFIELD VIC., Essex County, NJ., Library of Congress Historic American Buildings Survey. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  90. ^ A Brief History of Fairfield Reformed Church, Reformed Church of America. Accessed October 10, 2013. "At the turn of the century it was decided to erect a new church building 1/2 mile north of the old one. Made of brownstone from a Little Falls quarry, the new structure was constructed in 1804. Several decades later a tall white steeple and a balcony were added.Today the congregation continues to worship in the same historic building and the tall white steeple remains physically prominent in the community."
  91. ^ Essex County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of March 22, 2010. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  92. ^ NYCOMED US INC. ACQUIRES BRADLEY PHARMACEUTICALS, INC., Fougera, February 21, 2008. Accessed November 5, 2012. "Nycomed has announced that the PharmaDerm headquarters will be located in Florham Park, New Jersey. The Company will be transitioning key employees from Bradley's Fairfield corporate headquarters building to Florham Park over the next several months."
  93. ^ ABout Us, Cricket Hill. Accessed November 5, 2012. "Cricket Hill is a microbrewery located in Fairfield, NJ. In 2002, we brewed our first beers East Coast Lager and American Ale."
  94. ^ Corporate Profile, Critical Links. Accessed November 5, 2012. "Critical Links is a venture backed company headquartered in Fairfield, New Jersey, and with offices in Portugal, United Kingdom and India."
  95. ^ Kilgannon, Corey. "At Home of ‘As Seen on TV,’ a Chance for Inventors", The New York Times, December 15, 2009. Accessed November 5, 2012. "Norberto Ponce pitched his invention, the Mower Buddy, to A.J. Khubani, the founder and CEO of TeleBrands, at its headquarters in Fairfield, N.J."
  96. ^ Kaabe, Michael. "Celebrating the Stage: Theater News", Asbury Park Press, September 19, 2008. Accessed November 5, 2012. "One of the nominees this year for Outstanding Performance By An Actor is Joey La Varco, originally from Fairfield."
  97. ^ Staff. "Field Hockey Assistant Coach Michelle Vizzuso Chosen As New Jersey Player Of Century", Virginia Cavaliers, October 11, 1999. Accessed November 5, 2012. "Virginia assistant field hockey coach Michelle Vizzuso (Fairfield, N.J./West Essex) was named the state's best field hockey player of the 20th century by the Newark Star-Ledger."

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