Fake Tales of San Francisco

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"Fake Tales of San Francisco"
Single by Arctic Monkeys
from the album Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not
Released August 2006 (US Only)
Format Radio-only single
Recorded 2005
Genre Indie rock,[1] garage rock
Label Domino
Writer(s) Alex Turner
Producer(s) Jim Abbiss and Alan Smyth
Arctic Monkeys singles chronology
"When the Sun Goes Down"
(2006)
"Fake Tales of San Francisco"
(2006)
"Leave Before the Lights Come On"
(2006)
Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not track listing
  1. "The View from the Afternoon"
  2. "I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor"
  3. "Fake Tales of San Francisco"
  4. "Dancing Shoes"
  5. "You Probably Couldn't See for the Lights But You Were Staring Straight at Me"
  6. "Still Take You Home"
  7. "Riot Van"
  8. "Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secured"
  9. "Mardy Bum"
  10. "Perhaps Vampires Is a Bit Strong But..."
  11. "When the Sun Goes Down"
  12. "From the Ritz to the Rubble"
  13. "A Certain Romance"

"Fake Tales of San Francisco" is a song by English indie rock band Arctic Monkeys originally released on the band's first EP Five Minutes with Arctic Monkeys in May 2005.[2] After being featured on the band's debut album Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not, the song was released as a radio only single [3] in the United States instead of "Leave Before the Lights Come On", which was released there at the end of October. The song was also released in the Netherlands,[4] where it reached number 31 on the Dutch Singles Chart. The song was popular on alternative rock radio in the U.S. in late 2006, but ultimately did not chart on the Billboard Hot Modern Rock Tracks chart.

The song has been one of the band's signature tracks, with its popularity as the band's first recorded track. The song derides a fictional South Yorkshire band for taking its inspiration from the USA while never having been there, with lyrics such as "I'd love to tell you all my problem / You're not from New York City, you're from Rotherham", and "He talks of San Francisco, he's from Hunter's Bar". The song's title, however, has made it a fan favorite in the United States.

Music video[edit]

The music video for the song is the same as when it was previously released on Five Minutes with Arctic Monkeys. Directed by a friend of the band, Mark Bull, the video features a compilation of footage of some of the band's earliest performances at various gigs and was given airplay in the UK on MTV2 in 2005. Although he has now left the band, the video includes several shots of former bassist Andy Nicholson.

References[edit]

External links[edit]