Falling Joys

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Falling Joys
Falling Joys reunited 1, National Museum of Australia, 2011-02-26.jpg
Falling Joys (reunited in 2011)
Background information
Origin Canberra, Australia
Genres Alternative rock
Indie pop
Years active 1985–1995/96
2011 – present
Labels Volition Records
Associated acts Stella One Eleven, Splinter
Members Suzie Higgie
Stuart G. Robertson
Pat Hayes
Pete Velzen
Past members Jason Morrisby, Robin Miles

Falling Joys is an Australian alternative rock band formed in Canberra in 1983. The original lineup was lead singer/guitarist Suzie Higgie singer/keyboardist Robin Miles, bass guitarist Stuart G. Robertson and drummer Anthony Merrilees. The line-up changed in 1985 to include lead singer/guitarist Suzie Higgie, guitarist Stuart G. Robertson, bass guitarist and vocalist Pat Hayes, and drummer Pete Velzen. They released 3 albums on Volition and numerous singles and EP's. The band reunited in 2011 for concerts in Canberra and Sydney.

History[edit]

Falling Joys were one of Australia's most promising acts in the late 1980s and early 1990s, along with other up-and-comers like Ratcat, Clouds, Tall Tales and True and The Hummingbirds.

Higgie formed the band with Miles, Robertson and Merrilees in the early 1980s and played in and around Canberra and Sydney. Miles and Merrilees left the band in late 1985 and Robertson and Higgie who worked at ABC TV Canberra, continued the band with Hayes, a member of a well-known Canberran musical family (including Bernie Hayes and Anthony Hayes aka Stevie Plunder) and Peter Velzen, who was playing at the time with the Plunderers alongside Nic Dalton and Plunder. Robertson worked in videotape operations and Higgie as a vision mixer. The Falling Joys were part of the Duckberg group, a set of independent bands publishing their own record label, and recorded their first few singles under this label. Secret Seven was another of the bands publishing under this label.

They frequently played at the Australian National University Refectory Bar. In 1988/89 the band moved to Sydney and played frequently at the Annandale Hotel. They supported international touring acts, including The Buzzcocks in 1989. In the early 1990s they were rumoured to be "the next big thing" in the Sydney music scene, but larger success eluded them and they remained a well-known "indie" band. They were named most popular independent act at the 1993 Australian Music Awards.[1] Towards the end of the band's life, Velzen was replaced by Jason Morrisby on the recording of one EP (Universal Mind).

Post break-up[edit]

In 1998, Suzie Higgie collaborated with keyboardist Conway Savage, a member of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, on an album entitled Soon Will be Tomorrow. Her first true solo album, Songs of Habit, was released in 2002. Hayes played bass in the band Stella One Eleven. Another collaboration 'Splinter' EP recorded with Andrea Croft from the Honeys and Catherine Wheel was re-released in 2013

Reunion[edit]

On the 26th of February 2011, Falling Joys played their first live show in 15 years at the outdoor amphitheatre of the National Museum of Australia, Canberra. The band also played at the Oxford Arts Factory in Sydney on the 10th of June 2011.

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Year Title Label
1990 Wish List Volition
1992 Psychohum Volition
1993 Aerial Volition

EPs and singles[edit]

Year Title Label
1986 Burnt So Low b/w Kiss the World self-produced
1988 Nearly A Sin Volition
1988 You're In A Mess Volition
1989 Omega Volition
1990 Lock It Volition
1991 Jennifer Volition
1991 Jennifer - The Live EP Volition
1992 Black Bandages Volition
1992 Incinerator Volition
1992 A Winter's Tale Volition
1993 Fiesta! Volition
1993 Breakaway Volition
1994 Make It Soon/Amen Volition
1995 Universal Mind Volition

Compilations[edit]

Year Title
1985 Duck Soup ("Burnt So Low (Live)" and "Wide Open Skies")
1985 Beyond the Wireless ("What She Believes")
1989 Rockin' Bethlehem ("The Little Drummer Boy")
1991 JJJ: Live at the Wireless ("Puppy Drink")
1994 Earth Music ("Over Now")

References[edit]

  1. ^ Scatena, Dino (January 1994). "Random Notes". Rolling Stone Australia (Sydney, NSW: Tilmond Pty Ltd) (492): page 8. 

External links[edit]