FHI 360

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FHI 360
Founded 1971
Type Non-government organization
Focus

Public Health
International development

Education, Nutrition, Environment, Economic Development, Civil Society, Gender Equality, Youth, Research, Technology, Social Marketing and Communication
Location
Area served Field Offices in 32 nations
Currently Operating in 70 nations
Revenue $350,691,000 (2010)
Employees 4,000 employees
Slogan The science of improving lives
Website Family Health International Homepage
Formerly called International Fertility Research Program

FHI 360 (formerly Family Health International) is a nonprofit human development organization dedicated to improving lives in lasting ways by advancing integrated, locally driven solutions. Staff includes experts in health, education, nutrition, environment, economic development, civil society, gender equality, youth, research and technology-- creating a unique mix of capabilities to address today's interrelated development challenges. FHI 360 serves more than 70 countries and all U.S. states and territories. Established in 1971, the organization has long managed in projects relating to family planning and reproductive health. In 1986 the organization began a worldwide response to HIV/AIDS.[1][2][3][4] FHI's research and programs also address malaria, tuberculosis, and other infectious and chronic diseases and international agencies, governments, foundations, research institutions, and individual donors.[5][6][7][8] FHI partners include the United States of America.[9]

History[edit]

Family Health International grew from a contraceptive research project begun at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1971.[10] An initial grant from the US Agency for International Development (USAID) helped establish the International Fertility Research Program (IFRP), which became an independent, nonprofit organization in 1975.[11] In 1982 IFRP changed its name to Family Health International.[11] Since then Family Health International work expanded beyond family planning into other areas of reproductive health research and technical assistance.[12] FHI investigated and implemented effective ways to prevent sexually transmitted diseases and enhance the quality of reproductive health services.[13] In 1986, FHI began working on early strategies to prevent HIV infectionand in 1987 FHI was awarded USAID's first five-year HIV/AIDS prevention program in developing countries.[14][15] Continuous funding since then – from USAID, the National Institutes of Health (NIH),[16] and others – enabled FHI to manage some of the largest HIV/AIDS programs in the world. US Government agencies, principally USAID, the National Institutes of Health, and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention,[17] remain important funding sources. Other major sponsors of HIV/AIDS programs, as well as other health and development areas, include the United Kingdom's Department for International Development (DFID), the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.[18][19] Increasingly, other governments, private foundations, and the private sector are partnering with FHI to overcome the health and development challenges.[20][21] In 2010, Family Health International rebranded itself with the new tagline, “The science of improving lives,” highlighting FHI's commitment to empirical science empowering the world’s most vulnerable people. The name was also simplified to FHI, reflecting a broadened scope that encompasses health and development as well as service to families, communities, and nations.[22] In 2011, the teams of experts from Family Health International and Academy for Educational Development came together to create FHI 360. Staff includes experts in health, education, nutrition, environment, economic development, civil society, gender equality, youth, research and technology-- creating a unique mix of capabilities to address today's interrelated development challenges. FHI 360 serves more than 70 countries and all U.S. states and territories.

Innovations[edit]

CAPRISA 004[edit]

Main article: CAPRISA 004

FHI contributed to a clinical trial called CAPRISA 004 which provided an important breakthrough in the fight against HIV and genital herpes with a vaginal gel that significantly reduces a woman’s risk of infection.[23][24][25][26][27][28][29]

Areas of focus[edit]

Areas of focus include:

  • Family planning[30][31]
  • Child and maternal health[32]
  • Infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis[33][34][35][36]
  • Chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease[37]
  • Nutrition[38]

FHI 360 works with national governments and local communities to strengthen broader health systems and create lasting improvements in the lives of individuals and families.[citation needed]

Global operations[edit]

Country offices[edit]

Headquartered in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, Family Health International (FHI360) maintains field offices in thirty-two countries, including management centers in Bangkok, Thailand; Pretoria, South Africa; and Washington, DC. FHI has worked in over 100 countries since 1971 and is currently engaged in activities in more than 70 countries.[8]

Haiti relief efforts[edit]

On Tuesday, January 12, 2010, a devastating earthquake struck near Port-au-Prince, the base of operations of FHI’s work in Haiti. Several family members of FHI staff were killed. In response to the great need for humanitarian effort, FHI established a “Fund for Haiti Relief," working with the country office in Haiti and a network of local partners throughout Haiti.[39][40]

Affiliations[edit]

CSIS Commission on Smart Global Health Policy[edit]

Family Health International’s President for Public Health Programs, Peter Lamptey, was named a member of the CSIS Commission on Smart Global Health Policy in 2009.[41][42] The Commission brings together twenty-six prominent leaders from the private sector, the United States Congress, academia, media, and the security, foreign policy, and global health communities to set goals and priorities for US global health efforts over the next decade and beyond.[43]

The Commission released its final report, A Healthier, Safer, and More Prosperous World, in March 2010.

Global Business Coalition on HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria[edit]

Family Health International was announced as one of the Global Business Coalition (GBC) on HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria's first non-corporate members in December 2009.[20] The GBC is an alliance of over 200 companies dedicated to strengthening the ties between business, government, and civil society in the pursuit of worldwide improved health.[44]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://allafrica.com/stories/200807310553.html
  2. ^ "Before sex Aids pill trials to start – News". nation.co.ke. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Family Health International – healthfinder.gov – FHI". healthfinder.gov. June 9, 2011. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  4. ^ [1][dead link]
  5. ^ "PD Projects by Organization". Positivedeviance.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Global Health Council – Family Health International Receives Grant to Evaluate Once-Daily Antiretroviral as a Potential Method of HIV Prevention". Globalhealth.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  7. ^ "UNC School of Public Health – FHI-UNC Public Health Fellowship Program". Sph.unc.edu. October 6, 2011. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  8. ^ a b "FHI 360 – Four Decades of Improving Lives". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  9. ^ Kombe Kaponda-USAID/Zambia/EXO (July 19, 2011). "USAID/Zambia::Population Health and Nutrition". Usaid.gov. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Invalid link". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  11. ^ a b "Spinoffs – UNC Carolina Population Center". Cpc.unc.edu. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  12. ^ http://www.fhi.org/en/RH/Programs/index.htm
  13. ^ "FHI 360 – Contraceptive and Reproductive Health Technologies Research and Utilization Program". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Global Health Council – Publications". Globalhealth.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  15. ^ [2][dead link]
  16. ^ "Family Health International/IMPACT-Ghana's HIV/AIDS program with Faith-Based Partners". Gateway.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Campaigns and Initiatives – Campaign Overviews". Cdc Npin. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  18. ^ Triangle Business Journal (May 28, 2009). "Gates Foundation grants Family Health International $100k for HIV work – Triangle Business Journal". Bizjournals.com. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  19. ^ http://www.theglobalfund.org/programs/grant/?CountryId=KEN&compid=315&grantid=69&lang=en
  20. ^ a b "Welcome to GBCHealth". Gbcimpact.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  21. ^ "Taylor Swift Signs Elephant For Family Health International". Looktothestars.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  22. ^ "360 – Family Health International Announces Updated Name". FHI. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  23. ^ "Effectiveness and Safety of Tenofovir Gel, an Antiretroviral Microbicide, for the Prevention of HIV Infection in Women". Sciencemag.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  24. ^ http://www.caprisa.org/joomla/Micro/CAPRISA%20004%20Press%20Release%20for%2020%20July%202010.pdf
  25. ^ Willard Cates Jr. "AIDS Conference Blog". Global Health Magazine. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  26. ^ "New Hope for Preventing HIV Transmission". Technology Review. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  27. ^ "AIDS Breakthrough: Gel Helps Prevent Infection". Huffington Post. July 19, 2010. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  28. ^ Dugger, Celia W. (July 19, 2010). "African Studies Give Women Hope in H.I.V. Fight". The New York Times (South Africa). Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  29. ^ [3][dead link]
  30. ^ "FHI 360: Private Company Information – BusinessWeek". Investing.businessweek.com. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  31. ^ "FHI 360 – Family Planning Counseling". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  32. ^ "FHI 360 – Maternal Mortality and Morbidity". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  33. ^ "Family Health International | Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation". Gatesfoundation.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  34. ^ "FHI 360 – Malaria". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  35. ^ "FHI 360 – Tuberculosis and HIV-AIDS". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  36. ^ "FHI 360 – HIV-AIDS Care and Support". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  37. ^ "FHI 360 – Managing Chronic Conditions: Optimizing Health Throughout Life". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  38. ^ "FHI 360 – Nutrition Project". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  39. ^ "Haiti Needs Your Help, Fund for Haiti Relief". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  40. ^ "HIV & AIDS Information :: Organisations with HIV-specific experience in Haiti seek donations, volunteers for relief efforts". Aidsmap.com. January 19, 2010. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  41. ^ "The CSIS Global Health Policy Center". Smartglobalhealth.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  42. ^ "The CSIS Global Health Policy Center". Smartglobalhealth.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  43. ^ "About Smart Global Health | The CSIS Global Health Policy Center". Smartglobalhealth.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  44. ^ "FHI 360 – Family Health International, Population Services International to Help Shape Public-Private Sector Collaboration on Diseases". Fhi.org. Retrieved October 18, 2011.