Fana (Sufism)

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Fanaa (Arabic: فناءfanāʾ ) is the Sufi term for "passing away" or "annihilation" (of the self).[1] Fana represents a breaking down of the individual ego and a recognition of the fundamental unity of God, creation, and the individual self.[1] Persons having entered this enlightened state obtain awareness of the intrinsic unity (Tawhid) between Allah and all that exists, including the individual's mind. It is coupled conceptually with baqaa, subsistence, which is the state of pure consciousness of and abidance in God.

The state of Fana is represented by Rumi in Book Six of the Masnavi where he writes:

When the Shaykh (Halláj) said ‘I am God’ and carried it through (to the end), he throttled (vanquished) all the blind (sceptics).

When a man's ‘I’ is negated (and eliminated) from existence,then what remains? Consider, O denier.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Harmless, William. Mystics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008
  2. ^ NICHOLSON, REYNOLD ALLEYNE, ed. The Mathnawí of Jalálu’ddín Rúmí. Poetry Soup. https://ia800908.us.archive.org/8/items/RumisMasnavi/Masnavi.pdf