Fantastic Four vs. the X-Men

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Fantastic Four vs. the X-Men
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Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format Limited series
Genre
Publication date 1987
Number of issues 4
Main character(s) Fantastic Four
X-Men
Franklin Richards
Doctor Doom
Creative team
Writer(s) Chris Claremont
Penciller(s) Jon Bogdanove
Inker(s) Terry Austin
Colorist(s) Glynis Oliver
Collected editions
Hardcover
(X-Men vs. Fantastic Four)
ISBN 0-7851-3807-2
Softcover
(Fantastic Four vs. the X-Men)
ISBN 0871356503

Fantastic Four vs. the X-Men is a four-issue comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics in 1987. Written by longtime Uncanny X-Men writer Chris Claremont, pencilled by Jon Bogdanove, and inked by Terry Austin, the series revolves around the quest to find an effective medical treatment for the dying X-Man, Kitty Pryde. Along the way, the Fantastic Four and the X-Men come into conflict with each other, and what appears to be a sinister secret regarding the Fantastic Four's origin comes to light.

Publication history[edit]

The series was collected in the trade paperback Fantastic Four vs. the X-Men (ISBN 0871356503), first printed in 1991. In 2010 it was reissued as a Marvel Premiere Classic hardcover, with the title reversed to X-Men vs. Fantastic Four (ISBN 0785138072).

Plot summary[edit]

Franklin Richards has a nightmare, wherein his father, Reed Richards, murders both the Fantastic Four and the X-Men. Reed then takes a book, disregarding the protests of his son, who says that the book is the cause of everything bad that happened. Reed opens the book and it transforms him into Doctor Doom. Waking in terror, Franklin finds his parents and tells his mother about the dream. As Susan unpacks boxes,[1] she finds Reed's college journal—which Franklin recognizes as the book from his dream. Ignoring Franklin's warning, she shows the journal to Reed.

At Muir Island, the X-Men and geneticist Moira MacTaggert are in dismay. Kitty Pryde's phasing abilities have gone awry, making the atoms of her body drift farther apart.[2] Magneto[3] suggests seeking assistance from Reed Richards. Traveling to Four Freedoms Plaza in New York City, Magneto persuades the Fantastic Four to help.

Arriving on Muir Island, Reed seems troubled. After examining Kitty, Reed states that his molecular reintegrator device cannot help her in her advanced condition. Magneto, having read up on the device's capabilities, contends that Reed is lying, prompting Wolverine and Rogue to attack the Fantastic Four in order to force them to help. X-Men leader Storm defuses the situation and renews her plea, but Reed still refuses. The teams are interrupted by a holographic communication from Doctor Doom. Doom offers to duplicate Reed's research, reconstruct the molecular reintegrator and save Kitty. Reed protests that they should not indebt themselves to Doom, but Storm counters that Reed has left them no choice.

Later, Susan reveals the contents of Reed's journal to the rest of the Fantastic Four. A key passage of the journal states that Reed planned to counter the potential supervillain threat by flying Ben Grimm, Johnny Storm, Susan and himself into the cosmic rays which would turn them into the Fantastic Four.[4] Although Reed denies writing the inflammatory passage, Ben, Johnny and the She-Hulk leave Four Freedoms Plaza.

In Latveria, Kitty prepares to commit suicide in order to prevent the X-Men from indebting themselves to Doom for her sake. Franklin, present on the scene via one of his "dream-selves", successfully pleads for Kitty not to do so. While Reed wonders if he might have subconsciously planned for the cosmic radiation to bombard the rocket years earlier, Sue eventually realizes that Reed could not have written the passage from the journal, citing how he responds to Franklin as a parent where the clinical man in the journal would never have done such a thing. Feeling compelled to overcome his self-doubt and help Kitty, decides to travel to Latveria (with Franklin in tow). The other members of the Fantastic Four, having come to terms with the changes their powers made to their lives, return to FF headquarters and volunteer to accompany him. Misunderstanding their intentions, the X-Men attack the Fantastic Four upon their arrival. The two teams relent when Franklin arrives and reminds them that saving Kitty is what is important.

Doctor Doom begins the treatment to save Kitty, with Reed overseeing. When Reed claims that he has made a crucial mistake in the reintegration process, Doom refuses to listen, but Franklin speaks up and shames him into letting Reed help. Seeing Doom's reaction to Reed's struggles with the process, Susan realized that he forged the journal and planted it among Reed's things years ago. Reed successfully navigates the problems with the reintegration, saving Kitty's life and causing her molecular structure to begin its slow return to normal. While the Fantastic Four and the X-Men make amends, Susan confronts Doom, but he will not admit to having written the journal entry. After issuing a veiled threat to Doom, Susan allows the celebration of Kitty's recovery to resume.

In other media[edit]

Film[edit]

  • In December 2013, the investment website The Motley Fool reported that 20th Century Fox planned a crossover film between the two teams based on this miniseries.[5][6] According to Schmoes Know, Fox has no plans to make a crossover film.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ After the original Baxter Building was destroyed by Kristoff Vernard in Fantastic Four #278 (May 1985), the FF temporarily moved into Avengers Mansion until the completion of Four Freedoms Plaza.
  2. ^ Kitty Pryde became permanently trapped in her phased form in a battle with the Marauders. Uncanny X-Men #211 (November 1986).
  3. ^ Magneto joined the X-Men and became headmaster of Professor Xavier's School for Gifted Youngsters after a critically injured Professor X left Earth. Uncanny X-Men #200 (December 1985).
  4. ^ Fantastic Four #1 (November 1961).
  5. ^ 2 Companies Other Than Disney That Will Profit From Marvel
  6. ^ Kit, Borys (January 6, 2014). "Forget Franchises: Why 2014 Will Be Hollywood's Year of the 'Shared Universe'". Hollywood Reporter. 
  7. ^ "Fox Has No Plans to Cross X-MEN & FANTASTIC FOUR!?!?". Schmoes Know. April 17, 2014. Retrieved 2014-04-17.