Far Hills, New Jersey

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Far Hills, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Far Hills
Official seal of Far Hills, New Jersey
Seal
Map of Far Hills in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Far Hills in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Far Hills, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Far Hills, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°41′27″N 74°37′18″W / 40.690871°N 74.621571°W / 40.690871; -74.621571Coordinates: 40°41′27″N 74°37′18″W / 40.690871°N 74.621571°W / 40.690871; -74.621571[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Somerset
Incorporated May 12, 1921
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Paul J. Vallone (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Dorothy Hicks (acting)[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 4.881 sq mi (12.641 km2)
 • Land 4.797 sq mi (12.424 km2)
 • Water 0.084 sq mi (0.217 km2)  1.72%
Area rank 280th of 566 in state
12th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation [6] 213 ft (65 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 919
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 925
 • Rank 536th of 566 in state
19th of 21 in county[11]
 • Density 191.6/sq mi (74.0/km2)
 • Density rank 511th of 566 in state
21st of 21 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07931[12][13]
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3403522890[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID 0885217[16][2]
Website http://borofarhills.tripod.com/

Far Hills is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 919,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 60 (+7.0%) from the 859 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 202 (+30.7%) from the 657 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

Far Hills was incorporated as a borough based on an Act of the New Jersey Legislature passed on April 7, 1921, from portions of Bernards Township, subject to the results of a referendum held on May 12, 1921.[18] Far Hills is a dry town where alcohol cannot be sold.[19][20]

Geography[edit]

Far Hills is located at 40°41′27″N 74°37′18″W / 40.690871°N 74.621571°W / 40.690871; -74.621571 (40.690871,-74.621571). According to the United States Census Bureau, Far Hills borough had a total area of 4.881 square miles (12.641 km2), of which, 4.797 square miles (12.424 km2) of it was land and 0.084 square miles (0.217 km2) of it (1.72%) was water.[2][1]

History[edit]

Far Hills encompasses nearly 5 square miles (13 km2) in Somerset County, encircled by the equally upscale communities of Bedminster Township, Peapack-Gladstone, Bernards Township, and Bernardsville.[21] It shares a community pool, athletic programs, civic organizations, and a school system with Bernardsville. It shares a public library, a fire department and a first aid squad with neighboring Bedminster Township

The borough maintains the character through 10-acre (40,000 m2) minimum zoning laws whereby large private properties and homes surround a small village which was the creation of a wealthy New York businessman in the late 1800s.[22] The beginning of rail service to nearby Bernardsville in 1870, opened the area to city people seeking a respite from the heat and hurry of urban life.

Evander H. Schley, a land developer and real estate broker from New York, purchased thousands of acres in Bedminster and Bernards townships in the 1880s. One day in 1887, Schley's brother, Grant, and his wife, Elizabeth, arrived by horse-drawn carriage to see Evander's farms. Elizabeth is said to have remarked on the beautiful vista of the "far hills," thus giving the name to the place before a village was built.[23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 560
1940 574 2.5%
1950 600 4.5%
1960 702 17.0%
1970 780 11.1%
1980 677 −13.2%
1990 657 −3.0%
2000 859 30.7%
2010 919 7.0%
Est. 2013 925 [10] 0.7%
Population sources:1930[24]
1930-1990[25] 2000[26][27] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 919 people, 376 households, and 259.1 families residing in the borough. The population density was 191.6 per square mile (74.0 /km2). There were 418 housing units at an average density of 87.1 per square mile (33.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.32% (876) White, 0.65% (6) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 1.85% (17) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.54% (5) from other races, and 1.63% (15) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.58% (88) of the population.[7]

There were 376 households, of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.2% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.02.[7]

In the borough, 24.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 19.7% from 25 to 44, 35.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.5 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.6 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $125,833 (with a margin of error of +/- $29,841) and the median family income was $202,083 (+/- $85,006). Males had a median income of $177,083 (+/- $60,611) versus $76,250 (+/- $38,263) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $93,495 (+/- $19,515). About 3.6% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 859 people, 368 households, and 253 families. The population density was 176.8 people per square mile (68.2/km2). There were 386 housing units at an average density of 79.4 per square mile (30.7/km2). The racial makeup was 96.04% White, 0.81% African American, 0.12% Native American, 2.10% Asian, and 0.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.61% of the population.[26][27]

There were 368 households out of which 22.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.5% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.3% were non-families. 25.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.76.[26][27]

The population was spread out with 18.4% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 88.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household was $112,817, and the median income for a family was $149,095. Males had a median income of $90,000 versus $46,607 for females. The per capita income was $81,535. About 0.8% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.8% of those under age 18 and 1.2% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Far Hills is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Far Hills is Dr. Paul J. Vallone (R, term of office ends December 31, 2014). Members of the Far Hills Borough Council are Joseph Carty (R, 2014), Richard Hand (R, 2015), Thomas Howland (R, 2015), David Karner (R, 2016), David Surks (R, 2016) and Sheila Tweedie (R, 2014).[29][30][31][32]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Far Hills is located in the 7th Congressional District[33] and is part of New Jersey's 21st state legislative district.[8][34][35] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Far Hills had been in the 16th state legislative district.[36]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[37] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[38][39] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[40][41]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 21st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Thomas Kean, Jr. (R, Westfield) and in the General Assembly by Jon Bramnick (R, Westfield) and Nancy Munoz (R, Summit).[42][43] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[44] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[45]

Somerset County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members.[46] As of 2014, Somerset County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Patrick Scaglione (R, Bridgewater Township, 2015),[47] Freeholder Deputy Director Mark Caliguire (R, Skillman in Montgomery Township, 2015),[48] Peter S. Palmer (R, Bernardsville, term ends December 31, 2014),[49] Patricia L. Walsh (R, Green Brook Township, 2016)[50] and Robert Zaborowski (R, Somerset in Franklin Township, 2014),[51][52] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Brett A. Radi (R, Somerville, 2017),[53] Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano (R, Raritan, 2016)[54][55] and Surrogate Frank Bruno (R, Branchburg, 2015).[56]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 748 registered voters in Far Hills, of which 97 (13.0% vs. 26.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 382 (51.1% vs. 25.7%) were registered as Republicans and 268 (35.8% vs. 48.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[57] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 81.4% (vs. 60.4% in Somerset County) were registered to vote, including 107.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.4% countywide).[57][58]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 355 votes here (63.1% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 196 votes (34.8% vs. 52.1%) and other candidates with 5 votes (0.9% vs. 1.1%), among the 563 ballots cast by the borough's 726 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.5% (vs. 78.7% in Somerset County).[59] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 342 votes here (67.7% vs. 51.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 160 votes (31.7% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 2 votes (0.4% vs. 0.9%), among the 505 ballots cast by the borough's 636 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.4% (vs. 81.7% in the whole county).[60]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 282 votes here (69.6% vs. 55.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 65 votes (16.0% vs. 34.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 52 votes (12.8% vs. 8.7%) and other candidates with 5 votes (1.2% vs. 0.7%), among the 405 ballots cast by the borough's 743 registered voters, yielding a 54.5% turnout (vs. 52.5% in the county).[61]

Education[edit]

Students in public school attend the schools of the Somerset Hills Regional School District, a regional school district covering pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade serving students from Bernardsville, Far Hills, and Peapack-Gladstone, along with students from Bedminster Township who attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[62] As of the 2010-11 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,858 students and 156.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.86:1.[63]

The three schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[64]) are Bedwell Elementary School[65] (PreK–4, 689 students), Bernardsville Middle School[66] (5–8, 577) and Bernards High School[67] (9–12, 795), all of which are located in Bernardsville.[68]

Far Hills Country Day School is a private, nonsectarian coeducational day school located in Far Hills, serving 444 students in nursery through eighth grade on a 55-acre (220,000 m2) campus.[69]

Transportation[edit]

The Far Hills train station is a New Jersey Transit station on the Gladstone Branch of the Morristown Line; the building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is located at U.S. Route 202, near the intersection of Far Hills Road, one half mile east of U.S. Route 206, offering service via Secaucus Junction and New York Penn Station or to Hoboken Terminal.[70]

Points of interest[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Far Hills include:

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Far Hills has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[84]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Directory, Borough of Far Hills. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 77.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Far Hills, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Far Hills borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Far Hills borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Far Hills, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
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  18. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 223. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  19. ^ New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. New Jersey ABC list of dry towns (May 1, 2013)
  20. ^ Giordano, Rita. "More towns catching liquor-license buzz; Moorestown considers ending its dry spell", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 24, 2007. Accessed February 16, 2014.
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  22. ^ Goldman, E. Stanley. "Far Hills Taxes Questioned", The New York Times, October 17, 1971. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  23. ^ History, Borough of Far Hills. Accessed February 12, 2013.
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  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Far Hills borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Far Hills borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  29. ^ Borough Council, Borough of Far Hills. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  30. ^ SOMERSET COUNTY General Election November 2, 2010 - WINNERS LIST, Somerset County, New Jersey County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 12, 2013.
  31. ^ WINNERS LIST; Somerset County - General Election November 8, 2011, Somerset County, New Jersey County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 12, 2013.
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  33. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  35. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  39. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  40. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  43. ^ District 21 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  44. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  45. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ Somerset County Government: At Your Service, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  47. ^ Patrick Scaglione, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014. A term-end year of 2012 is listed as of date accessed.
  48. ^ Mark Caliguire, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  49. ^ Peter S. Palmer, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  50. ^ Patricia Walsh, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  51. ^ The Role of County Government 'What Is A Freeholder?', Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
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  53. ^ Biography: Somerset County Clerk Brett A. Radi, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  54. ^ Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano, Somerset County Sheriff's Office. Accessed August 5, 2014.
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  56. ^ Somerset County Surrogate, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
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  58. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 12, 2013.
  59. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Somerset County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 12, 2013.
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  61. ^ 2009 Governor: Somerset County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 12, 2013.
  62. ^ Somerset County School Districts-Sending/Receiving/Regional, Somerset County Superintendent of Schools. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  63. ^ District information for the Somerset Hills Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  64. ^ Data for the Somerset Hills School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 12, 2013.
  65. ^ Bedwell Elementary School, Somerset Hills Regional School District. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  66. ^ Bernardsville Middle School, Somerset Hills Regional School District. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  67. ^ Bernards High School, Somerset Hills Regional School District. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  68. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Somerset Hills Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  69. ^ Fast Facts, Far Hills Country Day School. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  70. ^ Somerset County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  71. ^ Leonard J. Buck Garden, Somerset County Park Commission. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  72. ^ Moggy Hollow at Leonard J. Buck Garden, Somerset County Park Commission. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  73. ^ Natirar, Somerset County Park Commission. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  74. ^ Contact Us , USGA Museum. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  75. ^ About Far Hills Race Meeting Association, Far Hills Races. Accessed August 25, 2012.
  76. ^ Quint, Michael. "The Financier 'Who Knows What Is Going On'", The New York Times, August 6, 1988. Accessed August 25, 2012. "The great grandson of Anthony N. Brady, an Irish emigrant who was a friend and business associate of Thomas A. Edison, Nicholas Brady grew up on a large estate in Far Hills, N.J., that borders on the Dillon family estate."
  77. ^ Caldwell, Dave. "A Hard-to-Match Personality, With Potential to Boot", The New York Times, May 27, 2006. Accessed August 25, 2012. "P. J. Chesson, who will drive in his first Indianapolis 500 on Sunday, has already had a wild week.... He grew up on a horse farm in Far Hills, N.J., and had little experience racing on ovals, let alone pavement, until two years ago."
  78. ^ "Belmont Loses Nijinsky to Newmarket", The New York Times, October 13, 1970. Accessed December 9, 2007. "Charles W. Engelhard of Far Hills, N.J., millionaire racehorse owner, gave approval today for his colt, Nijinsky, to race in the Champion Stakes at Newmarket on Saturday."
  79. ^ James, George. "Malcolm Forbes, Publisher, Dies at 70", The New York Times, February 26, 1990. Accessed August 25, 2012. "Malcolm Forbes, chairman and editor in chief of Forbes Magazine and a flamboyant multimillionaire whose enthusiastic pursuits included yachting, motorcycling and ballooning, died Saturday of a heart attack in his sleep at his home in Far Hills, N.J. He was 70 years old."
  80. ^ a b Peterson, Iver. "ON POLITICS; It's Not Too Late or Irrational For Mr. Forbes to Aim Lower", The New York Times, January 16, 2000. Accessed August 25, 2012. "Even Governor Whitman, his Far Hills neighbor and longtime acquaintance, was a county freeholder before she tried for the Senate and then went on to win the governor's race."
  81. ^ Plumeri Park, William & Mary Tribe baseball, January 1, 1999. Accessed August 25, 2012. "Baseball proved to be a lifelong love, and he and his family own two minor league baseball teams. Plumeri and his wife, Nancy, reside in Far Hills, N.J."
  82. ^ Ackermann, Peggy. "Andrew Schlafly", The Record (Bergen County), May 25, 2010. Accessed August 25, 2012. "Appearing before the high court for the recall group, Far Hills attorney Andrew Schlafly, son of conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly, cited a letter George Washington wrote to his nephew, Bushrod Washington, on Nov. 10, 1787."
  83. ^ Froonjian, John. "WHITMAN PREPARES TO CHALLENGE FLORIO IN BID FOR GOVERNOR", The Press of Atlantic City, January 17, 1993. Accessed August 25, 2012. "Whitman, 46, of Far Hills has only recently officially confirmed that she will seek to challenge Democratic incumbent Jim Florio."
  84. ^ Climate Summary for Far Hills, New Jersey

External links[edit]