Farahnaz Pahlavi

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Princess Farahnaz
Princess of Iran
Mohammad Pahlavi Coronation.jpg
Coronation of the Shah of Iran in 1967. Princess Farahnaz (third from left).
Full name
English: Farahnaz
Persian: فرحناز
House House of Pahlavi
Father Mohammad Reza Pahlavi
Mother Farah Pahlavi
Born (1963-03-12) 12 March 1963 (age 51)
Tehran, Iran
Iranian Imperial Family
Imperial Coat of Arms of Iran.svg

HIM Empress Farah

  • HIH Princess Farahnaz
    • HIH Princess Iryana Leila

HIH Prince Gholam Reza
HIH Princess Manizheh

  • HIH Prince Bahram
    HIH Princess Iman
    • HIH Prince Romil Goger
  • HIH Prince Bahman
    HIH Princess Shohreh
    • HIH Princess Nazbanoo
  • HIH Princess Maryam
  • HIH Princess Azardokht

  • HIH Prince Patrick Ali
    HIH Princess Sounia Maryam
    • HIH Prince Davoud
      • HIH Princess Solvène
    • HIH Prince Houd
    • HIH Prince Muhammad Yunes

HIH Princess Ashraf

  • HH Prince Shahram Pahlavi Ghavam
    HH Princess Naz Pahlavi
    • HH Prince Cyrus Pahlavi
    • HH Prince Amir Pahlavi

Farahnaz Pahlavi (born 12 March 1963 in Tehran) is the eldest daughter of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi by his third wife, Farah Pahlavi.

She was born Princess Yasmin Farahnaz Pahlavi,[1] as per official dynastic usage, with the style Her Imperial Highness. She resides in New York City.

Education[edit]

She studied at the Niavaran Special School in Tehran, the Ethel Walker School in Simsbury, Connecticut, United States, and the Cairo American College in Cairo, Egypt. From 1981 to 1982, she attended Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont. She received a Bachelor of Arts in social work from Columbia University in 1986 and a Master's degree in child psychology from the same university in 1990.[1]

According to a 2004 article in Los Angeles Times, she reportedly attempted to find employment at international aid agencies such as UNICEF, but, according to her mother, was rejected because of her name.

Ancestry[edit]

References[edit]

  • Bruges, Jean-Jacques de, "Shahbanou Farah", Point de Vue, 31 August-6 September 2005, Issue 2980
  • "Shah's Daughter Could Not Stand Exile," BBC News, 12 June 2001 [2]
  • "Victory of Light Over Darkness is Near in Iran", Iran Press Service, 27 July 2001 [3]
  • Bahrampour, Tara, "Singer Revives Memories of Lost Youth and Lost Country", The New York Times, 28 August 2000
  • Krebs, Albin and Robert McG. Thomas, "Notes on People: Pahlevis [sic] Inquire About New England School", The New York Times, 16 November 1981, page B5
  • Krebs, Albin and Robert McG. Thomas, "Notes on People: A Daughter of Shah Auditing College Classes", The New York Times, 28 November 1981, page 39
  • "Princesse Farahnaz: Les 20 Ans", Point de Vue, March 1983
  • Marcisz, Christopher, "Son of Shah Advocates Democracy for Iran", Berkshire Eagle, 21 April 2004
  • O'Connor, Anne-Marie, "Style & Substance: A Widow's Look at a Shah's Legacy", The Los Angeles Times, 10 March 2004, page E1
  • Cunningham, Bill, "Spring Sightings", The New York Times, 28 March 2004, page 9
  • Beaumont, Peter, "Water Resource Development in Iran", The Geographic Journal, Vol. 140, No. 3 (October 1974), pages 418-431

External links[edit]

Styles of
Princess Farahnaz of Iran
Imperial Coat of Arms of Iran.svg
Reference style Her Imperial Highness
Spoken style Your Imperial Highness
Alternative style Ma'am