Fathali M. Moghaddam

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Fathali M. Moghaddam
Residence United States
Nationality Iranian
Fields Psychology
Institutions Georgetown University
McGill University
United Nations
Known for Research on social psychology, cultural psychology and psychology of conflict

Fathali M. Moghaddam is an Iranian psychologist, professor of psychology at Georgetown University and director of Conflict Resolution Program, Department of Government, Georgetown University.[1][2][3][4][5]

Theory and books[edit]

Moghaddam has proposed that there are two types of behavior: a first that is causally determined and a second that is normatively regulated. The mistake of traditional psychology, and social sciences more broadly, is to try to explain all behavior by applying causal models. He has attempted to demonstrate how causal and normative accounts can combine to create a more complete science of behavior.[6] Second, through concepts such as the embryonic fallacy [7] and interobjectivity,[8] Moghaddam gives priority to collective over individual processes, and argues that personal worldview and identity emerge from collective worldview and identity. This sets him apart from traditional research, which he argued is individualistic and reductionist. Third, Moghaddam has criticized traditional psychology as reflecting the international power structure, with the United States as the only superpower of psychology stamping the discipline with its individualistic, 'self help' ideology.[9] He has criticized what he claims is a 'wholesale' exportation of American psychology to the rest of the world, and argued for the need for an appropriate psychology for the non western world.[10] His concept of double reification describes the process of Western culture being exported to the modern sector of non-Western societies, then being 'discovered' by cross-cultural researchers and reported as a 'universal.'[11]

Explaining terrorism[edit]

Since 9/11, Moghaddam has applied his 'collectivist/normative' approach to explaining radicalization and terrorism in the context of accelerating fractured globalization.[12][13][14] His staircase model of terrorism is a concrete outcome of this approach.[15][16] His solution to radicalization is a new policy to managing intergroup relations, based on his alternative policy of omniculturalism,[17][18] which focused on human commonalities and rejects both assimilation and multiculturalism.[19] He has also worked to establish an empirical basis for universal human rights,[20] and to explain the rise and fall of dictatorships through his springboard model.[21] His claim is that in terms of personality characteristics, there are potential dictators in all human groups. The key is to understand the conditions that give rise to the springboard, which enables a potential dictator to spring to power.

Although Moghaddam was initially trained as an experimental researcher using the minimal group paradigm (Henri Tajfel was his PhD thesis examiner), he has also used qualitative methods, collaborating with Rom Harré on positioning theory [22][23] and exploring the role of language in conflicts.[24][25] His interest in diverse methods have extended to cross-disciplinary interest in psychology and literature.[26] Since 2013 he is the editor of Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Moghaddam, F.M. (2013) The Psychology of Dictatorship. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association (APA).
  • Moghaddam, F.M. (2011) терроризм с точки зрения террористob «что они переживают и думают и почему обращаются к насилию [From the Terrorists' Point of View: What They Experience and Why They Come to Destroy]. Westport, CT: Praeger Security International.
  • Moghaddam, F. M. (2010) The New Global Insecurity. Westport, CT: Praeger Security International.
  • Taylor, D.M. & Moghaddam, F.M. (2010).集団間関係の社会心理学―北米と欧州における理論の系譜と発展 [Theories of Intergroup Relations: International Social Psychological Perspectives]. (2nd Ed.) Westport, CT: Praeger Press. (Original work published 1994.)
  • Moghaddam, F. M. (2008). Multiculturalism and Intergroup Relations: Implications for Democracy in Global Context. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association Press.
  • Moghaddam, F. M. (2008). How Globalization Spurs Terrorism: The Lopsided Benefits of 'One World' and Why That Fuels Violence. Westport, CT: Praeger Security International.
  • Moghaddam, F. M. (2006). From the Terrorists' Point of View: What They Experience and Why They Come to Destroy. Westport, CT: Praeger Security International.
  • Lee, Y. T., McCauley, C., Moghaddam, F. M., & Worchel, S. (Eds.) (2004). The Psychology of Ethnic and Cultural Conflict. Westport, CT: Greenwood.
  • Moghaddam, F. M., & Marsella, A. J. (2004). Understanding Terrorism: Psychosocial Roots, Consequences, and Interventions (1st ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Moghaddam, F. M., Taylor, D. M.(1994). Theories of Intergroup Relations: International Social Psychological Perspectives. Second Edition. New York: Praeger. Hardcover & Softcover.
  • Moghaddam, F. M., Taylor, D. M.(1987). Theories of Intergroup Relations: International Social Psychological Perspectives. New York: Praeger. Hardcover & Softcover.
  • Finkel, N. J., & Moghaddam, F. M. (2005). The Psychology of Rights and Duties: Empirical Contributions and Normative Commentaries. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Moghaddam, F. M & Harre, R. (2010). Words of Conflict, Words of War: How the Language We Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting.
  • Moghaddam, F. M., Harre, R., & Lee, N. (2007). Global Conflict Resolution through Positioning Analysis. New York, NY: Springer.
  • Harre, R., & Moghaddam, F. M. (2003). The Self and Others: Positioning Individuals and Groups in Personal, Political, and Cultural Contexts. Westport, CT.: Praeger.
  • Harre, R., & Moghaddam, F. M. Psychology for the Third Millennium: Integrating Cultural and Neuroscience Perspectives. Sage.
  • Moghaddam, F. M. (2005). Great Ideas in Psychology: A Cultural and Historical Introduction. Oxford England: Oneworld.
  • Moghaddam, F. M. (2002). Psicologia sociale. Bologna: Zanichelli.
  • Moghaddam, F. M. (2002). The Individual and Society: A Cultural Integration. New York, NY: Worth Publishers.
  • Moghaddam, F. M. (1998). Social Psychology: Exploring Universals across Cultures. New York, NY: W.H. Freeman
  • Moghaddam, F. M., & Studer, C. (1998). Illusions of Control: Striving for Control in Our Personal and Professional Lives. Westport, CT: Praeger.
  • Moghaddam, F. M. (1997). The Specialized Society: The Plight of the Individual in an Age of Individualism. Westport, CT: Praeger.
  • Moghaddam, F. M., Taylor, D. M., & Wright, S. C. (1993). Social Psychology in Cross-Cultural Perspective. New York, NY: W.H. Freeman.

References[edit]

  1. ^ An interview with Fathali Moghaddam
  2. ^ On Fathali Moghaddam
  3. ^ Berkley Center
  4. ^ psychology of dictatorship
  5. ^ Conference of the International Society For Justice Research
  6. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2002). The Individual and Society. New York: Worth. Harré, R., & Moghaddam, F. M. (Eds.) (2012). Psychology for the Third Millennium: Integrating Cultural and Neuroscience Perspectives. London & Thousand Oaks, CA.: Sage. Hardcover and softcover.
  7. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2013). The Psychology of Dictatorship. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association Press.
  8. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2010). "Interobjectivity, Intersubjectivity, and the Embryonic Fallacy in Developmental Science". Culture & Psychology, 16, 465–475. Sammut, G., Daanen, P., & Moghaddam, F. M. (Eds.) (2013). Understanding the Self and Others: Explorations in Intersubjectivity and Interobjectivity. New York: Routledge.
  9. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (1987). "Psychology in the Three Worlds: As Reflected by the 'Crisis' in Social Psychology and the Move toward Indigenous Third World Psychology". American Psychologist, 47, 912–920.
  10. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. & Taylor, D. M. (1986). "What Constitutes an 'Appropriate' Psychology for the Developing World?" International Journal of Psychology, 21, 253–267.
  11. ^ Moghaddam, F. M., & Lee, N. (2006). "Double Reification: The Process of Universalizing Psychology in the Three Worlds". In A. Brock (Ed.), Internationalizing the History of Psychology (pp. 163–182). New York University Press.
  12. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2006). From the Terrorists' Point of View: What They Experience and Why They Come to Destroy. Westport, CT.: Praeger Security International Series.
  13. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2008). How Globalization Spurs Terrorism: The Lopsided Benefits of 'One World' and Why That Fuels Violence. Westport, CT.: Praeger Security International.
  14. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2010). The New Global Insecurity: How Terrorism, Environmental Collapse, Economic Inequalities, and Resource Shortages are Changing Our World. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger Security International.
  15. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2005). "The Staircase to Terrorism: A Psychological Exploration". American Psychologist, 60, 161–169.
  16. ^ Moghaddam, F. M., Warren, Z., & Love, K. (2013). "Religion and the Staircase to Terrorism". In R. F. Paloutzian & C. Park (Eds.), Handbook of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality. 2nd. ed. (pp. 632–648). New York: Guilford Publications.
  17. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2012). "The Omnicultural Imperative". Culture & Psychology, 18, 1–27.
  18. ^ Moghaddam, F. M., & Breckenridge, J. (2010). "Homeland Security and Support for Multiculturalism, Assimilation, and Omniculturalism Policies among Americans". Homeland Security Affairs, 4, 1–14.
  19. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2008). Multiculturalism and Intergroup Relations. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association Press.
  20. ^ Finkel, N., & Moghaddam, F. M. (Eds.) (2005). The Psychology of Rights and Duties: Empirical Contributions and Normative Commentaries. Washington D.C.: American Psychological Association Press.
  21. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2013). The Psychology of Dictatorship. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association Press.
  22. ^ Harré, R. & Moghaddam, F. M. (Eds.) (2003). The Self and Others: Positioning Individuals and Groups in Personal, Organizational, Political, and Cultural Contexts. Westport, CT.: Praeger.
  23. ^ Harré, R. & Moghaddam, F. M. (Eds.) (2013). The Psychology of Friendship and Enmity: Relationships in Love, Work, Politics, and War. Santa Barbara, CA.: Preager.
  24. ^ Moghaddam, F. M., Harré, R., & Lee, N. (Eds.) (2008). Global Conflict Resolution through Positioning Analysis. New York: Springer.
  25. ^ Moghaddam, F. M., & Harré, R. (Eds.) (2010). Words of Conflict, Words of War: How the Language We Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting. Santa Barbara, CA.: Praeger.
  26. ^ Moghaddam, F. M. (2004). "From 'Psychology in Literature' to 'Psychology is Literature': An Exploration of Boundaries and Relationships". Theory & Psychology, 14, 505–525.

External links[edit]