Fathi Baja

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Fathi Mohammed Baja (Arabic: فتحي محمد البعجة‎), also called Fatih Baja, is a Libyan academic and a member of the National Transitional Council in charge of political affairs and representing Benghazi.[1] Baja attended Cairo University, Northeastern University, then Mohammed V University in Morocco, where he earned a PhD in political science at Mohammed V University.[2] He taught at Garyounis University.[1] He wrote the manifesto adopted by leaders to outline the basic goals of the 2011 Libyan civil war: democracy and national unity.[3] Baja represents the city of Benghazi on the National Transitional Council of Libya. He is also the member of the council in charge of political affairs, and as such heads the Political Affairs Advisory Committee.[1] In this role, he has had direct contact with leaders and representatives from the Libya Contact Group.[4] He has stated that council members have studied the De-Ba'athification of Iraq and the aftermath of dissolution of the Soviet Eastern Bloc and wish to avoid similar disorder and purging of policemen and officials in Tripoli and other cities.[5] He has also worked to assure foreign leaders that rivalries will not erupt within the council and that the transition will be democratic.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "National Transitional Council". Benghazi: National Transitional Council. 2011. Archived from the original on 25 August 2011. Retrieved 25 August 2011. 
  2. ^ Ro'ya newspaper, June 27; 2011, no. 9, p.5.
  3. ^ "Wer kommt, wenn Gaddafi geht?". Der Standard (Vienna). 25 August 2011. Archived from the original on 26 August 2011. Retrieved 26 August 2011. 
  4. ^ "Diplomats Meet in Turkey to Discuss Libya's Future". Voice of America (Washington, D.C.). Federal government of the United States. 25 August 2011. Archived from the original on 26 August 2011. Retrieved 26 August 2011. 
  5. ^ "Good intentions, fragile legitimacy". The Economist (London). Economist Group. 27 August 2011. Archived from the original on 27 August 2011. Retrieved 27 August 2011. 
  6. ^ Birsel, Robert (18 August 2011). "Libya's rebels face questions as transition looms". Reuters (New York City). Thomson Reuters. Archived from the original on 27 August 2011. Retrieved 27 August 2011.