Fatima Mansions (housing)

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Fatima Mansions
Location Rialto, Dublin, Ireland
Status Demolished and rebuilt under Public Private Partnership between 2004 and 2007.
Constructed 1949-1951

Fatima Mansions is an extensive public housing complex located in Rialto, Dublin. In recent years it has undergone a substantial urban renewal programme with the assistance of public and private funding.[1] All existing apartment blocks were demolished to make way for 600 accommodation units, consisting of social, affordable and private housing along with community, business and leisure facilities at a cost of €200 million.[2] The blocks have since been renamed Herberton Apartments, but the area is still referred to locally as Fatima.

History[edit]

The original complex, built between 1949 and 1951 by Dublin City Council, consisted of fifteen blocks, each of four floors in height. They replaced tenement housing for the area's working-class residents, and were initially considered a great improvement in living conditions.[3] The area was notorious for its high levels of heroin use and drug dealing[4] which eventually led to the original complex's demolition due to the drug problem's severity.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fatima Groups United". The Ireland Funds. 2011. Retrieved 5 November 2011. 
  2. ^ "Housing Regeneration Projects". Dublin City Council. c. 2011. Retrieved 5 November 2011. 
  3. ^ Corcoran, Mary P. (2006). "Re-Imagining the Built Environment - Place, Community and Neighborhood in the City of Dublin". In Andrew Higgins Wyndham. Re-imagining Ireland. Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Public Policy. University of Virginia Press. pp. 176–182. ISBN 978-0-8139-2544-8. Retrieved 05-11-2011.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  4. ^ Byrne, Shay (2007). The miracle of Fatima Mansions: an escape from drug addiction. Dunboyne: Maverick House Publishers. pp. ?. ISBN 1-905379-40-4. 
  5. ^ Lyder, André (2005). Pushers Out: The Inside Story of Dublin's Anti-drugs Movement. Bloomington, IN: Trafford Publishing. p. 122. ISBN 1-4120-5099-5.