Fawwaz T. Ulaby

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Fawwaz T. Ulaby
فواز علبي
Citizenship American
Nationality Syrian
Notable awards IEEE Edison Medal (2006)

Fawwaz T. Ulaby (Arabic: فواز علبي‎) is Arthur Thurnau Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor[1] and formerly the Founding Provost and Executive Vice President of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and Betty Williams Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. He is most famous for the development of micro-electronics for a suite of circuits and antennae for THz sensors and communication systems. Today, THz technology is an enabling technology in various types of industrial sensor applications. Professor Ulaby is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). His daughter, Neda Ulaby, is a reporter at the NPR culture desk.

Career[edit]

Ulaby was born in Damascus, Syria and grew up in Lebanon. He attended the American University of Beirut, from which he received a B.S. degree in physics in 1964. He later received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 1968.

After teaching at the University of Kansas he moved to the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in the mid 1980s. He served as the R. Jamieson and Betty Williams Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and has also served as the Vice President for Research.[2]

Ulaby has done extensive work outside of academia as well, giving testimony to the House Science Committee of the US congress and serving on the board of directors for The Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS).

In March 2008, Ulaby was named Founding Provost of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://sitemaker.umich.edu/fawwaz.ulaby/short_bio
  2. ^ "Fawwaz T. Ulaby". IEEE Global History Network. IEEE. Retrieved 25 July 2011.