Fax art

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Fax art is art specifically designed to be sent or transmitted by a facsimile machine, where the "fax art" is the received "fax". It is also called telecommunications art or telematic art.[1] "Fax art was another means of mediating distances," according to art historians Annmarie Chandler and Norie Neumark.[2] Fax art was first faxed in 1980, but that was not documented until 1985.[2] The earliest scholarly note of fax art in art history was in 1990 by Karen O'Rourke.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stuart Mealing, Computers and art, pp. 100-102 (Intellect Books, 2002) ISBN 978-1-84150-062-1. Found at Google Books. Accessed October 7, 2010.
  2. ^ a b Annmarie Chandler, Norie Neumark, At a distance: precursors to art and activism on the Internet, p. 267. (MIT Press, 2005) ISBN 978-0-262-03328-2. Found at Google Books. Accessed October 7, 2010.
  3. ^ Karen O'Rourke, "Notes on 'Fax-Art'", New Observations N° 76 (New York, May–June 1990), pp.24-25. See Karen O'Rourke's website. This article is cited extensively, see, Google search and Google Scholar search, e.g., Eduardo Kac, Telepresence & bio art: networking humans, rabbits, & robots, n. 69, p. 58, (Studies in literature and science) (University of Michigan Press, 2005) ISBN 978-0-472-06810-4, found at Google Books. All accessed October 7, 2010.

Sources[edit]

  • Tapani Aartomaa, Kari Piippo, Taideteollinen korkeakoulu. Graafisen suunnittelun laitos, Fax art: just now (Canon, 1992) ISBN 978-951-96562-0-5. See Google Books
  • Urbons Klaus, Elektrografie - Analoge und digitale Bilder, (Köln (DE), DuMont Buchverlag, 1994)
  • Andrej Tišma, International Fax Art Project (VLV Gallery, 1995) See Google Books

External links[edit]