Fayette County, Kentucky

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Fayette County, Kentucky
Robert F. Stephens Courthouse, Fayette County Kentucky.jpg
Robert F. Stephens Courthouse Complex in Lexington, Kentucky
Map of Kentucky highlighting Fayette County
Location in the state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location in the U.S.
Founded 1780
Named for Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette
Seat Lexington
Largest city Lexington
Area
 • Total 285.52 sq mi (739 km2)
 • Land 284.52 sq mi (737 km2)
 • Water 1.00 sq mi (3 km2), 0.35%
Population
 • (2010) 308,428
 • Density 1,042.8/sq mi (364.5/km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.lexingtonky.gov

Fayette County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population of Fayette County was estimated to be 308,428 in 2013.[1] Its territory, population and government are coextensive with the city of Lexington, which also serves as county seat.[2]

Fayette County is part of the Lexington–Fayette Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Fayette County was one of the original three counties created from the former Kentucky County, Virginia by the Virginia Act in 1780, along with Jefferson and Lincoln counties, and which together separated from Virginia in 1792 to become the state of Kentucky. Fayette County then included land which makes up 37 present-day counties and portions of 7 others. It was reduced to its present boundaries in 1799. The county is named for the Marquis de Lafayette, who came to America to join the rebelling English colonies in the American Revolutionary War.[3][4]

On January 1, 1974, Fayette County merged its government with that of its county seat of Lexington, creating a consolidated city-county governed by the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 285.52 square miles (739.5 km2), of which 284.52 square miles (736.9 km2) (or 99.65%) is land and 1.00 square mile (2.6 km2) (or 0.35%) is water.[5]

Major highways[edit]

Sycamore tree in Fayette County, Kentucky

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 18,410
1800 14,028 −23.8%
1810 21,370 52.3%
1820 23,250 8.8%
1830 25,098 7.9%
1840 22,194 −11.6%
1850 22,735 2.4%
1860 22,599 −0.6%
1870 26,656 18.0%
1880 29,023 8.9%
1890 35,698 23.0%
1900 42,071 17.9%
1910 47,715 13.4%
1920 54,664 14.6%
1930 68,543 25.4%
1940 78,899 15.1%
1950 100,746 27.7%
1960 131,906 30.9%
1970 174,323 32.2%
1980 204,165 17.1%
1990 225,366 10.4%
2000 260,512 15.6%
2010 295,803 13.5%
Est. 2012 305,489 3.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
2012 Estimate[7]

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 260,512 people, 108,288 households, and 62,915 families residing in the county. The population density was 916 people per square mile (354/km²). There were 116,167 housing units at an average density of 408 per square mile (158/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 81.04% White, 13.48% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 2.46% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.21% from other races, and 1.58% from two or more races. 3.29% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 108,288 households out of which 27.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.50% were married couples living together, 11.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.90% were non-families. 31.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the county the population was spread out with 21.30% under the age of 18, 14.60% from 18 to 24, 33.20% from 25 to 44, 20.90% from 45 to 64, and 10.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 96.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,813, and the median income for a family was $53,264. Males had a median income of $36,166 versus $26,964 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,109. About 8.20% of families and 12.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.30% of those under age 18 and 8.60% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns[edit]

Rural communities[edit]

  • Athens
  • Clays Ferry
  • Little Texas
  • South Elkhorn
  • Andover
  • Todds Station
  • Colby (split between Clark and Fayette County.)
  • Spears (split between Jessamine and Fayette Counties.)

Historically black hamlets[edit]

Hemp production was a major crop
  • Bracktown
  • Cadentown
  • Little Georgetown
  • Pralltown
  • Jimtown

Education[edit]

Schools[edit]

Schools in the county are operated by Fayette County Public Schools.

Colleges and universities[edit]

Private high schools[edit]

Private middle and elementary schools[edit]

Public high schools[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. p. 35. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 124. 
  5. ^ "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. Retrieved 2011-02-13. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Census.gov. Retrieved August 1, 2013. 
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  9. ^ "Midway College - Lexington Campus". Retrieved May 13, 2011. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°02′N 84°28′W / 38.04°N 84.46°W / 38.04; -84.46