Fear and Loathing in America

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Fear and Loathing in America
FearAndLoathingInAmerica.jpg
First edition
Author Hunter S. Thompson
Country United States
Language English
Publisher Simon & Schuster
Publication date
2000
Pages 784
ISBN ISBN 0-684-87315-X
OCLC 63717046
070/.92 B 21
LC Class PN4874.T444 A3 2000
Preceded by The Fear and Loathing Letters, Vol. 1: The Proud Highway: The Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman 1955–1967
Followed by The Mutineer: Rants, Ravings, and Missives from the Mountaintop 1977–2005

Fear and Loathing in America: The Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist 1968–1976 is a collection of hundreds of letters Hunter S. Thompson wrote (as well as a handful he received) after his rise to fame with his 1966 hit Hell's Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs. These letters deal primarily with Thompson and his editor at Random House, Jim Silberman, his correspondence with Oscar Zeta Acosta, and his perpetually fluctuating relationship with Jann Wenner, the founder of Rolling Stone.

Through this time period, Thompson discusses Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72, and his unending desire to see The Rum Diary made into a film.

In this second volume of letters – the first being The Proud Highway: The Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman 1955–1967'[1] – an insight into Thompson's eccentricity and brilliance is found.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Fear and Loathing Letters, Vol. 1: The Proud Highway: The Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman 1955–1967, (1997) ISBN 0-679-45285-0

Further reading[edit]