Febreze

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Febreze logo.

Febreze is a brand of household odor eliminator manufactured by Procter & Gamble, sold in North America, Brazil, Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. First introduced in test markets in 1993,[where?] the product has been sold in the United States since June 1998, and the line has since branched out to include air fresheners (Air Effects), fabric refreshers, plug-in oils (Noticeables), scented disks (Scentstories), odor eliminating candles and automotive air fresheners.

Ingredients[edit]

A bottle of Febreze.

The active ingredient in Febreze is hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD). Procter & Gamble claims that these molecules bind hydrocarbons within the doughnut shape, retaining malodorous molecules, which reduces their release into the air and thus the perception of their scent.[1] The original formula was developed in Plymouth, England. The use of a cyclodextrin as a sprayable odor absorber is patented by Procter & Gamble.[2]

Marketing[edit]

The product, initially marketed as a way to get rid of unpleasant smells, sold poorly until P&G realised that people become accustomed to smells in their own homes, and stop noticing them even when they are overpowering (like the smell of several cats in a single household). The marketing then switched to linking it to pleasant smells and good cleaning habits instead, which resulted in a massive increase in sales. Only after the product became well established in the marketplace did the marketing go back to emphesising odor elimination properties as well.[3]

Safety[edit]

Veterinary toxicology experts working for the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center consider Febreze fabric freshener products to be safe for use in homes with pets.[4] However, the package labeling indicates that the product is considered not safe around birds.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chemical Functional Definitions - Cyclodextrin". Procter&Gamble. 2005. 
  2. ^ Uncomplexed cyclodextrin solutions for odor control on inanimate surfaces. US Pat. No. 5,714,137. Filed 1994; assigned 1998.
  3. ^ Duhigg, Charles (February 19, 2012). "How Companies Learn Your Secrets". The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved October 16, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Ask the Expert: Poison Control - Febreze". ASPCA. 2012. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 

External links[edit]