Federal Correctional Institution, Edgefield

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Federal Correctional Institution, Edgefield
Federal Correctional Institution, Edgefield.jpg
Location Edgefield County,
near Edgefield, South Carolina
Coordinates 33°45′31″N 81°55′10″W / 33.75861°N 81.91944°W / 33.75861; -81.91944Coordinates: 33°45′31″N 81°55′10″W / 33.75861°N 81.91944°W / 33.75861; -81.91944
Status Operational
Security class Medium-security (with minimum-security prison camp)
Population 1,700 (560 in prison camp)
Managed by Federal Bureau of Prisons

The Federal Correctional Institution, Edgefield (FCI Edgefield) is a medium-security United States federal prison for male inmates in South Carolina. It is operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, a division of the United States Department of Justice. The facility also has an adjacent satellite prison camp for minimum-security male offenders which houses between 500 and 549 inmates.

The satellite prison camp also has the Residential Drug and Alcohol Program which is part of the prison reform and rehabilitation program for those that are addicted to drugs and alcohol.

FCI Edgefield is located near the South Carolina-Georgia border, approximately 25 miles north of Augusta, Georgia.[1]

Notable incidents[edit]

In 2002, a correction officer assigned to FCI Edgefield, whom the Bureau of Prisons did not identify, pleaded guilty and was sentenced on Georgia state charges to three years' incarceration followed by seven years' supervised release for possession with the intent to distribute marijuana. A joint investigation by the Department of Justice Inspector General's Office and the Richmond County Sheriff's Office revealed that the officer took over $9,000 in bribes in exchange for receiving packages containing marijuana and passing them on to inmates.[2][3]

On May 20, 2010, the US Attorney's Office in Columbia, South Carolina announced that two former correctional officers at FCI Edgefield, Gregory Conyers and Antonio Heath, had been indicted for accepting bribes from inmate Boyce Tisdale in exchange for smuggling contraband into the facility. Conyers and Heath subsequently pleaded guilty and were sentenced to prison. Tisdale was transferred to the Federal Correctional Complex, Butner in North Carolina and is scheduled for release in 2023.[4][5][6]

Notable Inmates (current and former)[edit]

Inmate Name Register Number Status Details
Christopher Coke 02257-748 Serving a 23-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2030. Drug kingpin; leader of the Shower Posse, a violent drug gang in Jamaica; extradited to the US after a 72-hour manhunt during which 74 people were killed; Coke pleaded guilty in 2011 to trafficking large quantities of cocaine into the US.[7]
Miguel Rodriguez Orejuela 14022-059 Serving a 30-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2030. Co-founder of the now-defunct Medellin Cartel, which was responsible for as much as 80% of the cocaine brought into the US in the 1970s and 1980s; co-founder Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela is also serving a 30-year sentence.[8]
Quazi Nafis 81710-053 Serving a 30-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2038. Bangladeshi citizen; pleaded guilty in 2013 to attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction for attempting to detonate what he thought was a 1,000-pound bomb outside the Federal Reserve Bank in New York City.[9]
Jerome Finnigan 19755-424 Serving a 12-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2018. Former Chicago Police officer; pleaded guilty in 2011 to stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from drug dealers and plotting the murder of another officer whom he believed was cooperating with federal investigators.[10][11]
Michael David Barrett 22822-424 Released from custody on July 3, 2012 after serving 27 months. Pleaded guilty to interstate stalking in 2009 for following and secretly videotaping ESPN reporter Erin Andrews in hotels, posting the videos online and trying to sell them to the celebrity gossip site TMZ.[12]
Thomas Noe 26157-018 Transferred to an Ohio state prison in 2008; serving an 18-year sentence in connection with the Ohio Coingate Scandal.[13] Republican party fundraiser; pleaded guilty in 2006 to money laundering for illegally funneling money to President George W. Bush's 2004 campaign.[14][15][16]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "FCI Edgefield". Federal Bureau of Prisons. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  2. ^ "Office of Inspector General: Semiannual Report to Congress". Department of Justice. April 1, 2002–Sept. 30, 2002. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  3. ^ "Office of Inspector General: Semiannual Report to Congress". US Department of Justice. Oct. 1, 2010 – March 31, 2011. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  4. ^ "Ex-Guards Accused of Sneaking Contraband into Edgefield Federal Correctional Institution". WLTX-TV Columbia. May 20, 2010. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "Three indicted in smuggling of contraband at FCI-Edgefield". WRDW-TV Augusta. May 20, 2010. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  6. ^ "Three Charged with Bringing Drugs into Edgefield Federal Prison". Federal Bureau of Investigation. May 20, 2010. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  7. ^ Goldstein, Joseph (31 August 2011). "Christopher Coke Pleads Guilty in New York". The New York Times. 
  8. ^ "Cali Cartel Leaders Plead Guilty to Drug and Money Laundering Conspiracy Charges". US Department of Justice. September 26, 2006. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  9. ^ Long, Colleen (August 9, 2013). "Quazi Nafis Sentenced To 30 Years In Prison For Plot To Blow Up New York Federal Reserve". Huffington Post. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  10. ^ Sweeney, Annie (September 8, 2011). "12 years for Chicago cop at center of scandal: 'I can hold my head high'". Chicago Tribune. 
  11. ^ Meincke, Paul. "Ex-cop sentenced to 12 years in SOS probe". ABC. 
  12. ^ Associated Press (March 15, 2010). "Andrews' stalker gets 2½ years in prison". ESPN. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  13. ^ "Offender Search Detail: Thomas W. Noe". Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  14. ^ Drew, James; Steve Eder (May 1, 2007). "Noe's wife claims he is in solitary confinement". The Blade. Retrieved 2007-09-17. 
  15. ^ "GOP Fundraiser Gets 18 Years In Prison". CBS News. February 11, 2009. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  16. ^ Wilkinson, Mike (September 12, 2006). "Noe gets 27 months in federal prison for illegal Bush contributions". Toledo Blade. Retrieved 26 October 2013. 

External links[edit]