Federalist No. 13

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Alexander Hamilton, author of Federalist No. 13

Federalist No. 13 is an essay by Alexander Hamilton, the thirteenth of the Federalist Papers.[1] It was published on November 28, 1787 under the pseudonym Publius, the name under which all the Federalist Papers were published.[2] It is titled, "Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government."[2]

Summary[edit]

This essay focuses on the view that a Union would be more economically sound than separate States.[3] Publius explains that rather than having many separate governments to support, a Union would have only one national government to support.[4] He describes this as being both simpler and more economical.[5] The essay further explains that in order to defend themselves, separate States would have to work together, but their support of one another would be disjointed.[6] Only a fully united government would provide the best defense for all the States and be able to support military establishments and necessary civil servants.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hamilton, Alexander. "Federalist No. 13". The Avalon Project. Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale University. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Hamilton, Alexander. "Federalist No. 13". The Federalist Papers. Library of Congress. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  3. ^ The Federalist Papers. New York: New American Library, a division of Penguin Books. 1999. pp. 92–94. ISBN 0-451-52881-6. 
  4. ^ The Federalist Papers. New York: New American Library, a division of Penguin Books. 1999. p. 92. ISBN 0-451-52881-6. 
  5. ^ The Federalist Papers. New York: New American Library, a division of Penguin Books. 1999. p. 93. ISBN 0-451-52881-6. 
  6. ^ The Federalist Papers. New York: New American Library, a division of Penguin Books. 1999. pp. 93–94. ISBN 0-451-52881-6. 
  7. ^ The Federalist Papers. New York: New American Library, a division of Penguin Books. 1999. p. 94. ISBN 0-451-52881-6. 

External links[edit]

The Avalon Project, Yale University

Library of Congress