Federation of Ethiopia and Eritrea

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Ethiopian–Eritrean Federation

 

1952–1962
Flag of Ethiopia Flag of Eritrea
Motto
"Ethiopia Stretches Her Hands unto God"
Anthem
Ityopp'ya Hoy[1]
Ethiopia, Be Happy
Location of the Federation of Ethiopia and Eritrea
in the Horn of Africa.
Capital Addis Ababa
Languages Amharic
Tigrinya[2]
Arabic[2]
Government Federation
Emperor of Ethiopia
 -  throughout Haile Selassie I
Prime Minister of Ethiopia
 -  1952–1957 Makonnen Endelkachew
 -  1957–1960 Abebe Aregai
 -  1960 Imru Haile Selassie
 -  1961–1962 Aklilu Habte-Wold
Chief Executive of Eritrea
 -  1952–1955 Tedla Bairu
 -  1955–1959 Asfaha Woldemikael
 -  1959–1962 Abiye Abebe
Legislature Imperial Federal Council
Historical era Cold War
 -  Federation 15 September 1952
 -  Eritrean War of Independence 1961–1991
 -  Annexation of Eritrea 15 November 1962
Area 1,221,900 km² (471,778 sq mi)
Currency Ethiopian dollar
Today part of  Ethiopia
 Eritrea

The Federation of Ethiopia and Eritrea or Ethiopian–Eritrean Federation[3] was a federation of the Ethiopian Empire and Eritrea. It was created by the approval of the Federal Act in Ethiopia and the Eritrean Constitution on 15 September 1952.

Prior to the annexation of Eritrea, the Chief Justice of Eritrea was removed and the official Eritrean languages were eliminated in favor of Ethiopia's national language Amharic.[4] During the Federation, the encroachment of the Ethiopian Crown was felt on the Chief Executive of Eritrea. This was in direct contravention of the UN Resolution 390-A(V) which had established the Federation.[5]

The federal structure, or some semblance of it, existed between 15 September 1952 and 15 November 1962.[3] On 15 November 1962, following pressure from Haile Selassie I on the Eritrean Assembly,[6] the Federation was officially dissolved and Eritrea was annexed by Ethiopia.

References[edit]

  1. ^ www.nationalanthems.info
  2. ^ a b Official languages of the Federation alongside Amharic until 1956.
  3. ^ a b Siegbert Uhlig, et al. (eds.) (2005). Encyclopaedia Aethiopica, Vol. 2: D-Ha. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag. pp.405–409
  4. ^ Killion, Tom (1998). Historical Dictionary of Eritrea. The Scarecrow Press. ISBN 0-8108-3437-5. 
  5. ^ Haile, Semere (1987). "The Origins and Demise of the Ethiopia-Eritrea Federation". Issue (Issue: A Journal of Opinion, Vol. 15) 15: 9. doi:10.2307/1166919. JSTOR 1166919. 
  6. ^ Habteselassie, Bereket (1989). Eritrea and the United Nations and Other Essays. Red Sea Press. ISBN 0-932415-12-1. 

External links[edit]