Felicia Pride

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Felicia Pride

Felicia Pride is an American author, educator, and entrepreneur.[1] She is the founder of strategic media and communications firm, Pride Collaborative, with more than ten years of experience working in creative writing, education and media.[2][3][4]

Biography[edit]

Background[edit]

Pride is a native of Baltimore, Maryland and received a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration/Marketing from Towson University. She has a Master of Arts in Writing and Publishing from Emerson College.[5] Currently, she is a Hip-Hop Fellow at New York University.[6]

Books[edit]

Pride is the author of several books.

Of note is her young adult novel, Patterson Heights, which was a 2010 ALA Pick for Reluctant Readers.[7]

Her motivational book of essays, The Message: Life Lessons from Hip-Hop’s Greatest Songs, has been used as a teaching tool to engage students in classrooms across the country and was recently re-published by NBC Universal.[8][9][10][11]

Entrepreneurship/Professional Work[edit]

For seven years (2004-2011), Pride ran BackList, an organization she founded to nurture and highlight underrepresented voices and stories.[12][13]

In 2012, she launched a new firm, Pride Collaborative, a content agency which embraces a broader focus on storytelling.[3]

She also founded The Create Daily, a curated resource of opportunity for content creators that’s delivered daily via email.[14]

Works[edit]

Books[edit]

  • The Message: 100 Life Lessons from Hip-Hop’s Greatest Songs (2007)
  • Hallway Diaries (2007)
  • Everybody Hates Chris: Everybody Hates First Girlfriends #3 (2007)
  • Everybody Hates Chris: Everybody Hates School Politics #6 (2008)
  • Patterson Heights (2009)
  • To Create: Black Writers, Filmmakers, Storytellers, Artists and Media Makers Riff on Art, Careers, Life, and the Beautiful Mess in Between (2012)
  • The Message: Life Lessons from Hip-Hop’s Greatest Songs (2012)
  • The Educator's Guide to The Message: A Digital Companion (2012)
  • Homecoming (2013)

Presentations and Appearances[edit]

Felicia Pride has presented at numerous colleges, universities, libraries, conferences, and literary festivals.[15][16][17][18]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Felicia Pride | The Maynard Institute for Journalism Education". Maynardije.org. 2011-08-09. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  2. ^ Looney, Margaret (2013-01-30). "5 Tips for Transmedia Storytelling | Mediashift". PBS. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  3. ^ a b "a cross-platform media company". pride collaborative. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  4. ^ "How To Use Your Writing To Build A Platform With Felicia Pride". Thephatstartup.com. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  5. ^ "Felicia Pride | Emerson College". Emerson.edu. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  6. ^ [1][dead link]
  7. ^ "Patterson Heights (Kimani TRU): Felicia Pride: 9780373831487: Amazon.com: Books". Amazon.com. 2009-10-01. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  8. ^ "The Message: Life Lessons From Hip Hop’s Greatest Songs Focuses On Rap Messages For Youth". Hip-Hop Wired. 2012-10-16. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  9. ^ By Marco R. della Cava, USA TODAY (2008-01-14). "Read between the lyrics of these pop hits - USATODAY.com". Usatoday30.usatoday.com. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  10. ^ Pride, Felicia (2012-10-08). "The Educators’ Guide to The Message". NBC Publishing. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  11. ^ "Getting 'The Message' from Hip-Hop Lyrics". NPR. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  12. ^ "The BackList". Thebacklist.blogspot.com. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  13. ^ January 29, 2010 (2010-01-29). "Felicia Pride". Urbaniamag.com. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  14. ^ [2][dead link]
  15. ^ Gibbs, Etienne A. (2008-03-19). "Maximizing Your Potential: Meet Felicia Pride: Author, Speaker, and Literacy Advocate". Maximizingyourpotential.blogspot.com. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  16. ^ [3][dead link]
  17. ^ Bloomstein, Margot. "Confab Events". Confab Events. Retrieved 2014-02-27. 
  18. ^ "Tour". felicia pride. Retrieved 2014-02-27.