Felicior Augusto, melior Traiano

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Augustus (left) and Trajan.

"Felicior Augusto, melior Traiano" or "Sis felicior Augusto, melior Traiano" (Latin: "be more fortunate than Augustus [and] better than Trajan) was the formula delivered in the Roman Senate at the inauguration of late Roman emperors.[1] The phrase refers to the perceived well-being during the reigns of Augustus and Trajan. Particularly, it recalls Trajan's title Optimus (Best)[2] and expresses the senatorial memory of Trajan as the exemplar of imperial modesty. The phrase has been in use until at least 4th century AD,[2] when the Roman Empire had dramatically changed in character from what it had been under Trajan's rule.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eutropius, Breviarium, 8.5.3
  2. ^ a b Chenault, Robert R. (2008). Rome Without Emperors: The Revival of a Senatorial City in the Fourth Century CE. ProQuest. p. 108. 
  3. ^ "Trajan". UNRV History. Retrieved 28 November 2012.