Fender Bandmaster

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The Fender Bandmaster was a musical instrument amplifier made by Fender. It was introduced in 1953 and discontinued in 1974.[1]

This page focuses solely on the Bandmaster. See also Bandmaster Reverb.

Timeline[edit]

Timeline gleaned from[1]

Year Inputs Output Form Speakers Controls Circuit/Model Price
1953 2 instr, 1 mic Combo (Wide Panel) (1) 15" + ext jack Volume, Treble, Bass 5C7 $229.50
1954 2 instr, 1 mic Combo (Wide Panel) (1) 15" + ext jack Volume, Treble, Bass 5D7
1955 2 instr, 1 mic 26 watts Combo (Narrow Panel) (3) 10" + ext jack Volume, Treble, Bass, Presence 5E7
April 1960 2 channels, each with

high & low sensitivity
input jacks

Combo
(w/Modern Fender style)
each channel: Volume, Treble, Bass

Vibrato channel also: Speed, Intensity
master Presence

6G7
End 1960 2 channels, each with

high & low sensitivity
input jacks

each channel: Volume, Treble, Bass

Vibrato channel also: Speed, Intensity
master Presence

Feb 1961-

June 1963

2 channels, each with

high & low sensitivity
input jacks

40 Watts Piggyback ("head") (2) 12" + ext. jack

Oxford 12M6-10, Jensen C12N

each channel: Volume, Treble, Bass

Vibrato channel also: Speed, Intensity
master Presence

6G7-A
July 1963 2 channels, each with

high & low sensitivity
input jacks

40 watts Piggyback ("head") None each channel: Volume, Treble, Bass

Vibrato channel also: Speed, Intensity
Presence removed, "Bright" added

AB763
1968 2 channels, each with

high & low sensitivity
input jacks

Piggyback ("head") None each channel: Volume, Treble, Bass

Vibrato channel also: Speed, Intensity
Bright

AA568
1969 2 channels, each with

high & low sensitivity
input jacks

Piggyback ("head") None each channel: Volume, Treble, Bass

Vibrato channel also: Speed, Intensity
Bright

AA1069
1974 Discontinued . . . . .

Cosmetics[edit]

Circuit notes[edit]

6G7-A[edit]

The 6G7-A circuit was used in several Fender amplifiers, including the Bandmaster. It produces 40 watts into 4 ohms. The circuit was used from 1961 until July 1963 when the "AB763" circuit was introduced. "Blonde" aficionados feel this circuit has superior tonal characteristics when overdriven, to the AB763 circuit. The 6G7-A circuit also included a vibrato that is heralded as Fender's best by many enthusiasts.[2]

AB763[edit]

The AB763 (designed in July, 1963) circuit is arguably considered the "best" circuit version produced for this amp by collectors and aficionados. Amps retrofitted to this circuitry are described as having been "blackfaced," a reference to the black faceplate used on these amps during much of this era.

AA568[edit]

The AA568 version (introduced May, 1968) was met with popular dislike by Fender's customers. It is referred to at times as the "silverface" circuit, referring to the brushed aluminum control plate used from 1968 to 1974. The circuit change and the cosmetic change didn't happen at the same time; some 1967 and early 1968 Bandmasters still possessed the AB763 circuitry.

Unfortunately, the tube chart inside the amp head cannot be reliably used to differentiate the AB763 from the later circuits, as Fender continued using the older tube charts for a while after changing the circuit configuration.

AA1069[edit]

Some of the changes from the AA568 were reverted in October, 1969, yielding the AA1069 circuit, but many of the changes remained in place.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Teagle, J. and Sprung, J.: Fender Amps: The First Fifty Years
  2. ^ schema electrique pour un fender ban master 1961