Fenton Robinson

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Fenton Robinson (September 23, 1935 — November 25, 1997[1]) was an American blues singer and exponent of the Chicago blues guitar.

Biography[edit]

Born in Greenwood, Mississippi, United States, Robinson left his home at the age of 18 to move to Memphis, Tennessee where he recorded his first single "Tennessee Woman" in 1957.[2] He settled in Chicago in 1962.[2] He recorded his signature song, "Somebody Loan Me a Dime", in 1967 on the Palos label, the nationwide distribution of which was aborted by a freak snow storm hitting the Windy City. Covered by Boz Scaggs in 1969, the song was misattributed, resulting in legal battles. It has since become a blues standard, being "part of the repertoire of one out of every two blues artists", according to 1997's Encyclopedia of Blues.[3]

Robinson re-recorded the song for the critically acclaimed album Somebody Loan Me a Dime in 1974, the first of three he would produce under the Alligator Records label.[4][5] Robinson was nominated for a Grammy Award for the second, 1977's I Hear Some Blues Downstairs.[4]

In the 1970s he was arrested and imprisoned for involuntary manslaughter in connection with a car accident. Paroled after nine months, he continued playing in Chicago clubs and later taught guitar.

Robinson died of complications from brain cancer,[1] in Rockford, Illinois. Robinson's signature song, "Somebody Loan Me A Dime" can be heard in The Blues Brothers on the radio when Jake (John Belushi) is being transported and paroled.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Thedeadrockstarsclub.com - accessed November 2009
  2. ^ a b Russell, Tony (1997). The Blues - From Robert Johnson to Robert Cray. Dubai: Carlton Books Limited. pp. 159–160. ISBN 1-85868-255-X. 
  3. ^ Herzhaft, Gérard; Harris Herzhaft; Paul Harris; Brigitte Debord; Jerry Haussler; Anton J. Mikofsky (1997). Encyclopedia of the Blues. Brigitte Debord (trans.). University of Arkansas Press. p. 278. ISBN 1-55728-452-0. 
  4. ^ a b Tomko, Gene (2006). "Robinson, Fenton". In Edward M. Komara. Encyclopedia of the Blues: A - J. Routledge. p. 835. ISBN 0-415-92699-8. 
  5. ^ Cochran, Robert (2005). Our Own Sweet Sounds: A Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas. University of Arkansas Press. p. 58. ISBN 1-55728-793-7. 

External links[edit]