Ferrari/Maserati engine

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The Ferrari/Maserati engine is an architecture jointly developed by Ferrari and Maserati[citation needed] displacing between 4.2 L and 6.3 L, producing between 390 PS (287 kW; 385 hp) and 740 PS (544 kW; 730 hp) in street-legal configuration, and up to 830 PS (610 kW; 819 hp) in track configuration. All engines are naturally aspirated, have eight or twelve cylinders, incorporate dual overhead camshafts, variable valve timing, and four valves per cylinder.

The architecture has been produced in various configurations for cars under those badges as well as for a single Alfa Romeo model. All three companies are owned by the Fiat Group, under whom the engine sharing program was organized.

V8 (F136 family)[edit]

Most instances of the Ferrari/Maserati architecture are in the 90° V8 configuration. This was the first configuration and produces anywhere from 385 horsepower (287 kW) to 597 horsepower (445 kW). Maserati and Alfa Romeo versions have crossplane crankshafts,[1] while Ferrari versions are flat-crank.[2]

Those V8 engines are known as Tipo F136 family.

Maserati usage[edit]

Engine Displacement Years Usage Power Notes
F136R M138 4244 cc, 259 cid 2002–2007 Maserati Coupé, Maserati Spyder 390 PS (287 kW; 385 hp) dry sump
M138P 4244 cc, 259 cid 2004–2007 Maserati GranSport 400 PS (294 kW; 395 hp) dry sump
F136S M139A 4244 cc, 259 cid 2004–2008 Maserati Quattroporte DuoSelect 400 PS (294 kW; 395 hp) dry sump
F136U 4244 cc, 259 cid 2007–2012 Maserati Quattroporte Automatic 400 PS (294 kW; 395 hp) wet sump
M139P 4244 cc, 259 cid 2007–present Maserati GranTurismo 405 PS (298 kW; 399 hp) wet sump
F136Y M139R 4691 cc, 286 cid 2008–2011 Maserati Quattroporte S 430 PS (316 kW; 424 hp) wet sump
M139S 4691 cc, 286 cid 2007–present Maserati GranTurismo S (2008–2011)
Maserati GranTurismo S Automatic
Maserati Quattroporte S (2011–2012)
Maserati Quattroporte GT S (2008–2011)
Maserati GranCabrio
440 PS (324 kW; 434 hp) wet sump
4691 cc, 286 cid 2011–present Maserati GranTurismo MC Stradale
Maserati GranCabrio Sport
Maserati GranTurismo S (2011–present)
Maserati Quattroporte GT S (2011–2012)
450 PS (331 kW; 444 hp) wet sump
M145A 4691 cc, 286 cid 2012–present Maserati GranTurismo Sport 460 PS (338 kW; 454 hp) wet sump

Ferrari usage[edit]

Street legal engines[edit]

Engine Displacement Years Usage Power Notes
F136E 4308 cc, 263 cid 2004–2009 Ferrari F430
Ferrari F430 Spider
490 PS (360 kW; 483 hp) dry sump
F136ED 4308 cc, 263 cid 2007–2009 Ferrari 430 Scuderia
Ferrari Scuderia Spider 16M
510 PS (375 kW; 503 hp) dry sump
F136IB 4297 cc, 262 cid 2009–2012 Ferrari California 460 PS (338 kW; 454 hp) direct injection, wet sump
F136IH 4297 cc, 262 cid 2012–present Ferrari California 30 490 PS (360 kW; 483 hp) direct injection, wet sump
F136FB 4499 cc, 274 cid 2009–present Ferrari 458 Italia
Ferrari 458 Spider
570 PS (419 kW; 562 hp) direct injection, dry sump
F136FL 4499 cc, 274 cid 2013–present Ferrari 458 Speciale 605 PS (445 kW; 597 hp) direct injection, dry sump

Racing engines[edit]

Engine Displacement Years Usage Power Notes
F136EA 4308 cc, 263 cid 2007–2010 Ferrari F430 Challenge 490 PS (360 kW; 483 hp)  
F136GT 3997 cc, 244 cid 2006–present Ferrari F430 GTC 445 PS (327 kW; 439 hp)[3] with restrictor plates
  4497 cc, 274 cid 2011–present Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 465 PS (342 kW; 459 hp) with restrictor plates
  4497 cc, 274 cid 2011–present Ferrari 458 Italia GT3 550 PS (405 kW; 542 hp) with restrictor plates

Alfa Romeo usage[edit]

Engine Displacement Years Usage Power
F136YC 4691 cc, 286 cid 2007–2011 Alfa Romeo 8C Competizione
Alfa Romeo 8C Spider
450 PS (331 kW; 444 hp)

Gillet usage[edit]

Engine Displacement Years Usage Power
  4244 cc, 259 cid 2008– Gillet Vertigo.5 G2  
  4244 cc, 259 cid 2010–present Gillet Vertigo.5 Spirit 420 PS (309 kW; 414 hp)

A1GP usage[edit]

Engine Displacement Years Usage Power Notes
  4500 cc, 275 cid 2008–2009 A1GP "Powered by Ferrari" 600 PS (441 kW; 592 hp)[4] direct injection

V12 (F140 family)[edit]

The 65° V12 version of this engine was derived from the already extant V8. In the Ferrari Enzo, it had set the record for the most powerful naturally aspirated engine in a road car. The 5998 cc engine, designed for the Enzo, is known within Ferrari as the Tipo F140B, whereas the very similar Tipo F140C engine displaces 5999 cc and was designed for the Ferrari 599 as the most powerful series-production Ferrari engine. This engine is also used in Maserati Birdcage 75th.

Ferrari usage[edit]

Street legal engines[edit]

Tipo F140C engine (V12)
Engine Displacement Years Usage Power
F140B 5998 cc, 366 cid 2003–2004 Enzo Ferrari 660 PS (485 kW; 651 hp)
F140C 5999 cc, 366 cid 2006–2012 Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano 620 PS (456 kW; 612 hp)
F140CE 5999 cc, 366 cid 2010–2012 Ferrari 599 GTO 670 PS (493 kW; 661 hp)
F140EB 6262 cc, 382 cid 2011–present Ferrari FF 660 PS (485 kW; 651 hp)
F140FC 6262 cc, 382 cid 2012–present Ferrari F12berlinetta 740 PS (544 kW; 730 hp)
6262 cc, 382 cid 2013–present LaFerrari 800 PS (588 kW; 789 hp)

Racing engines[edit]

Engine Displacement Years Usage Power
  6262 cc, 382 cid 2005–2006 Ferrari FXX 800 PS (588 kW; 789 hp)
  6262 cc, 382 cid 2007–2008 Ferrari FXX Evoluzione 860 PS (633 kW; 848 hp)
  5999 cc, 366 cid 2009–2010 Ferrari 599XX 730 PS (537 kW; 720 hp)
  5999 cc, 366 cid 2011–present Ferrari 599XX Evo 740 PS (544 kW; 730 hp)

Maserati usage[edit]

Street legal engines[edit]

Engine Displacement Years Usage Power
M144A 5999 cc, 366 cid 2004–2005 Maserati MC12 630 PS (463 kW; 621 hp)

Racing engines[edit]

Engine Displacement Years Usage Power Notes
  5998 cc, 366 cid 2004–2006 Maserati MC12 GT1 about 600 PS (441 kW; 592 hp) with restrictor plates
  5998 cc, 366 cid 2006–2007 Maserati MC12 Corsa 755 PS (555 kW; 745 hp)  

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alfa Range Brochure" (PDF). alfaromeo.co.uk. Retrieved 2009-04-22. 
  2. ^ "Ferrari tech page on the flat-crank v8". Retrieved 2012-08-08. 
  3. ^ "CR Scuderia". CR Scuderia. Retrieved 2009-09-11. 
  4. ^ "A1GP". A1 Holdings Limited. Retrieved 2009-11-29. 

External links[edit]