Field sparrow

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Field Sparrow)
Jump to: navigation, search
Field sparrow
Field sparrow head.JPG
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Emberizidae
Genus: Spizella
Species: S. pusilla
Binomial name
Spizella pusilla
(Wilson, 1810)

Problems playing this file? See media help.

The field sparrow (Spizella pusilla) is a small New World sparrow.

Description[edit]

Adults have brown upperparts, a buffy breast, a white belly, two whitish wing bars and a dark-brown forked tail. They have a grey face, a rusty crown, a white eye ring and a pink bill. They have rusty markings behind the eye. There are grey and rufous colour variants.[2][3]

Standard Measurements[2][3]
length 5.1–6 in (130–150 mm)
weight 12.5 g (0.44 oz)
wingspan 8 in (200 mm)
wing 62.7–67.8 mm (2.47–2.67 in)
tail 62–68.4 mm (2.44–2.69 in)
culmen 8.7–9.8 mm (0.34–0.39 in)
tarsus 17.6–18.9 mm (0.69–0.74 in)

Distribution and habitat[edit]

Their breeding habitat is brushy, shrubby fields across eastern North America. The nest is an open cup on the ground under a clump of grass or in a small thicket.

These birds are permanent residents in the southern parts of their range. Northern birds migrate to the southern United States and Mexico.

Habits[edit]

These birds forage on the ground or in low vegetation, mainly eating insects and seeds. They may feed in small flocks outside the nesting season.

The male sings from a higher perch, such as a shrub or fencepost, which indicates his ownership of the nesting territory. The song is a series of sad whistles ending in a trill, often compared to the accelerating sound of a bouncing ball.

This bird's numbers expanded as settlers cleared forests in eastern North America, but may have declined in more recent times.

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Spizella pusilla". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Godfrey, W. Earl (1966). The Birds of Canada. Ottawa: National Museum of Canada. p. 395. 
  3. ^ a b Sibley, David Allen (2000). The Sibley Guide to Birds. New York: Knopf. p. 483. ISBN 0-679-45122-6. 

External links[edit]