Fifth Hughes Ministry

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Fifth Hughes Ministry was the sixteenth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 4 February 1920 to 9 February 1923.[1]

Nationalist Party of Australia

  • Rt Hon Billy Hughes, KC MP: Prime Minister. Attorney-General (to 21 December 1921), Minister for External Affairs (from 21 December 1921)
  • Rt Hon Joseph Cook, MP: Minister for the Navy (to 28 July 1920), Treasurer (28 July 1920 to 11 November 1921)
  • Senator Hon George Pearce: Minister for Defence (to 21 December 1921), Minister for Home and Territories (from 21 December 1921)
  • Hon William Watt, MP: Treasurer (to 15 June 1920)
  • Senator Hon Edward Millen: Minister for Repatriation
  • Hon Littleton Groom, MP: Minister for Works and Railways (to 21 December 1921), Attorney-General (from 21 December 1921)
  • Senator Hon Edward Russell: Vice-President of the Executive Council (to 21 December 1921)
  • Hon Walter Massy-Greene, MP: Minister for Trade and Customs (to 21 December 1921). Minister for Health (from 10 February 1921. Minister for Defence (from 21 December 1921)
  • Hon Alexander Poynton, MP: Minister for Home and Territories (to 21 December 1921), Postmaster-General (from 21 December 1921)
  • Hon George Wise, MP: Postmaster-General (to 21 December 1921)
  • Hon Sir Granville Ryrie, KCMG MP: Assistant Minister for Defence (to 21 December 1921)
  • Hon William Laird Smith, MP: Honorary Minister (to 28 July 1920), Minister for the Navy (28 July 1920 to 21 December 1921)
  • Hon Arthur Rodgers, MP: Assistant Minister for Repatriation (28 July 1920 to 21 December 1921), Minister for Trade and Customs (from 21 December 1921)
  • Hon Stanley Bruce, MP: Treasurer (from 21 December 1921)
  • Hon Richard Foster, MP: Minister for Works and Railways (from 21 December 1921)
  • Senator Hon John Earle: Vice-President of the Executive Council (from 21 December 1921)
  • Hon Hector Lamond, MP: Assistant Minister for Repatriation (from 21 December 1921)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Ministries and Cabinets". Parliamentary Handbook. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 17 September 2010.