Filamentation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Filament (disambiguation).

Filamentation is the anomalous growth of certain bacteria, such as E. coli, in which cells continue to elongate but do not divide (no septa formation). The cells that result from elongation without division have multiple chromosomal copies.[1] Bacterial filamentation is often observed as a result of bacteria responding to various stresses, including DNA damage or inhibition of replication. This may happen, for example, while responding to extensive DNA damage through the SOS response system. Nutritional changes may also cause bacterial filamentation. Some of the key genes involved in filamentation in E.coli include sulA and minCD.[2] The following genes have been connected to virulence using the G. mellonella infection model: BCR1,FLO8, KEM1, SUV3 and TEC1. These genes are required for biofilm development from filamentation.[3] Filamentation properties are argued to be necessary in virulence.[4] The biofilm of bacteria is also connected to the organism’s virulence. Filamentation is a survival strategy that protects bacteria from stressors such as host effectors and protist predators.[5] The strategy of filamentation is known to protect bacteria from antibiotic medicines taken by the host.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jaimes-Lizcano, Yuly A,, Hunn, Dayton D., Papadopoulos, Kyriakos D., 2014., Filamentous Escherichia coli cells swimming in tapered microcapillaries., Research in Microbiology 165: 166-174. 
  2. ^ "Cell division inhibitors SulA and MinCD prevent formation of the FtsZ ring. - Bi and Lutkenhaus 175 (4): 1118". The Journal of Bacteriology. February 1993. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 
  3. ^ Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn et al., 2010., Role of filamentation in Galleria mellonella killing by Candida albicans., Microbes and Infection 12: 488-496. 
  4. ^ Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn et al., 2010., Role of filamentation in Galleria mellonella killing by Candida albicans., Microbes and Infection 12: 488-496. 
  5. ^ Jaimes-Lizcano, Yuly A,, Hunn, Dayton D., Papadopoulos, Kyriakos D., 2014., Filamentous Escherichia coli cells swimming in tapered microcapillaries., Research in Microbiology 165: 166-174.